Ebden Falls But Can’t Explain Why - UBITENNIS
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Ebden Falls But Can’t Explain Why

Matthew Ebden, a quarterfinalist at Halle in 2018, faced Radu Albot, who was making his tournament debut, in the first round of the Noventi Open. Insights from the players about their exciting three set match were unavailable because of interview restrictions.

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Matthew Ebden (@ATP_Tour - Twitter)

When people who are passionate about tennis learn that I am a tennis journalist, the first comment that is almost always made is – I would love to have your job.

 

More often than not I completely agree. True, there is the pressure of coming up with an interesting story idea then doing the necessary background research in order to produce a story that captivates readers. There are other issues to confront such as the number of words required, along with deadline times. But, overall being a tennis journalist is for the most part, interesting and enjoyable.

Today, it became less so. I decide to write about Matthew Ebden, the 31-year old Australian, who is No. 80 in the rankings. He faced Radu Albot, who is 29 and hails from Moldova. He is ranked No. 41. (Interestingly, both were born in November, Albot on the 11th and Ebden on the 26th.) They had only met once before. Ebden was forced to retire to Albot because of a foot injury, when he trailed 6-0, 3-2 at this year’s Miami Open.

The Noventi Open is a 500 event being played in Halle, Germany. Here, a columnist must send an e-mail to the ATP PR & Marketing people working the championship with a request to interview a player.

I did this asking to speak with Ebden. I explained that I wanted to follow up on the Ubitennis story I wrote last year when he entered the tournament as a Special Exempt and reached the quarterfinals losing 7-6, 7-5 to Roger Federer.

The response I received was – This has to be win only. What seemed worse was that the interview, if he won, needed to be conducted in the “Mixed Zone” not an interview room.  Having written about the game for fifty-years, the answer was bewildering, shocking says it better. The reason given was confusing, because it came from an individual whose job is to be a conduit so media members can have direct access to the player(s) enabling them to better tell a tournament story.

(For those not in the know, the Mixed Zone is a cramped area immediately the behind the court on which the match is played where a sweat dripping player tries to gather his thoughts while a journalist attempts to find a stable spot on a tippy round chest high table to rest his notebook and scribble comments or place a tape recorder.)

As disappointed as I was with the “win only” dictate, I was more disappointed by not being able to talk with Ebden. He is eloquent and thoughtful when he answers questions. As an aside, he enrolled in law/commerce at the University of Western Australia and would have become a lawyer had he not become a successful tennis professional.

Today, he ended up absorbing a 5-7, 6-1, 6-4 defeat in two hours and eight minutes. “Win only” eliminated the opportunity to obtain telling quotes. As a result, “ATP Matchfacts” will have to provide a grasp of what took place. Ebden, one of the few serve and volleyers on the tour, had ten aces and seven double faults. Albot, who scampers around the baseline producing daring shots, had six aces and four double faults.

Slightly more telling was the fact Albot converted five of eighteen break points while Ebden was three of five. In the match, 203 points were played, and the winner collected 105. It is often said, “a point here and point there” determines the outcome of a match. Ebden earned 98 points and a mere seven points made the difference.

Again, I must apologize to Ubitennis readers. Matthew Ebden defines being a “professional” tennis player. It is a shame that the ATP PR & Marketing people behind the scenes at the Noventi Open don’t seem to be as professional.

 

 

 

 

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Canada beats Italy 2-1 in the opening day of the Davis Cup in Madrid

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Denis Shapovalov battled past Matteo Berrettini 7-6 (7-5) 6-7 (3-7) 7-6 (7-5) in a hard-fought second match of the round-robin Group F at the Davis Cup in Madrid to give Canada a 2-0 lead over Italy

 

Berrettini faced three break points in the third game of the opening set. Shapovalov earned two break points in the ninth game, but Berrettini held on his serve at deuce. Both players held on their service games. In the 10th game Berrettini earned three set points on return, but Shapovalov fended them off. Barrettini saved another break point to set up a tie-break. Shapovalov took a 6-3 lead earning three set points. Berrettini won two consecutive points to claw his way back to 5-6, but Shapovalov sealed the tie-break with a backhand passing shot.

Both players went on seve setting up a second tie-break. Berrettini got an early mini-break, but Shapovalov broke straight back. Berrettini took another mini-break to take a 3-2 when Shapovalov hit a volley into the net and sealed the second set 7-3 on his first set point.

Shapovalov earned a break point in the fifth game of the third set with a forehand winner. Berrettini held on his serve with his 11th ace. Both players went on serve in the next games setting up a third tie-break. Berrettini got the first mini-break to take a 4-3 lead after a double fault from Shapovalov. The young Canadian player broke straight back, when Berrettini made a forehand volley error. Shapovalov sealed the tie-break 7-5, when Berrettini fired his forehand long on his first match point after 2 hours.

“After making semifinals in the Madrid Mutua Open here, and winning the Junior Davis Cup in 2015, I feel like Madrid is a really good city for me. We will see how this week goes, but it’s a good step today”, said Shapovalov.

Fognini and Berrettini won the doubles match over beating Shapovalov and Pospisil 6-2 3-6 6-3. The Italian team got a double break to win the first set 6-2. Shapovalov and Pospisil drew level by winning the second set with a break in the eighth game. Italy saved two break points in the seventh game of the decisive set before breaking serve in the eighth game. Berrettini sealed the win for Italy with an ace.

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Pierre Hugues Herbert and Nicolas Mahut claim their first ATP Finals title in London

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The French team formed by Pierre Hugues Herbert and Nicolas Mahut claimed their first men’s doubles title with a 6-3 6-4 win over Raven Klaasen and Michael Venus in 70 minutes at the ATP Finals at the O2 Arena in London ending the 2019 ATP season on a high note with back-to-back titles in Paris Bercy and London. They remained unbeaten during the whole week at the ATP Finals in London winning all five matches in straight sets.

 

Herbert and Mahut fended off all four break points they faced scoring their ninth consecutive match win. The French doubles specialists have become the first team to win the doubles ATP Finals title without dropping a set since Jean Julien Rojer and Horia Tecau in 2015.

Herbert and Mahut fended off break points in the third game of the match before earning the only break of the opening set in the next game. The Frenchmen saved a break point in the sixth game before breaking serve in the seventh game.

They have become the French team to win the ATP Finals doubles title since Michael Llodra and Fabrice Santoro, who triumphed in Shanghai in 2005.

Herbert and Mahut have won 15 doubles titles as a team during their career. This year they became the eighth men’s doubles team to complete the career Grand Slam at last January’s Australian Open and also won the Rolex Paris Masters in front of their home fans.

Last year they came within one point of winning the ATP Finals title against Mike Bryan and Jack Sock after holding a match point.

“Thank you Nicolas for sharing the court, for having so much enjoyable moments and giving me so much joy, when I am with you on the court. You played an unbelievable final, so thank you for that”, said Pierre Hugues Herbert.

 

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Jannik Sinner wins his third ATP Challenger in Ortisei

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Jannik Sinner won the ATP Challenger in Ortisei adding another title to his impressive collection of trophies he lifted during a memorable 2019 season.

 

The 2019 Next Gen ATP Finals champion beat world number 173 Sebastian Ofner from Austria 6-2 6-4 in 1 hour and 6 minutes in the final of the Sparkasse Challenger Val Gardena Sudtirol at the Tennis Center in Ortisei.

Sinner won his third ATP Challenger title in 2019 after his previous wins in Bergamo and Lexington. He also reached the final in Ostrava. During the tournament the 18-year-old player from San Candido beat Lucas Miedler in the first round, Roberto Marcora in the second round, Federico gaio in the quarter final and Antoine Hoang in the semifinal without dropping a set.

Sinner will improve his ranking to his career-high at world number 78 in the ATP Ranking becoming the sixth best ranked Italian player after Matteo Berrettini, Fabio Fognini, Lorenzo Sonego, Marco Cecchinato and Andreas Seppi.

Sinner broke serve in the fifth game of the opening set to take a 3-2 lead. Ofner missed two game points in the seventh game. The Austrian player faced another break point after his third double fault. In the next game Sinner saved the first break point he faced. Sinner closed out the first set 6-2 after two backhand errors from Ofner in the eighth game.

Sinner went up a break to open up a 2-0 lead, but Ofner broke back in the fourth game and held on his serve to take a 3-2 lead. Ofner saved three break points in the seventh game to take a 4-3. Sinner converted his fourth break point in the ninth game to take a 5-4 lead and served out the win with two consecutive aces.

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