Madison Keys, the future of US Tennis? - UBITENNIS
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Madison Keys, the future of US Tennis?

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TENNIS – The Australian Open revealed US teenager Madison Keys on the Grand Slam stage. Keys has been considered the future star of US tennis since she won her first WTA match at the age of 14 when she beat Ajla Kudryavtsev at the MPS Group Tournament in Ponte Vedra (Florida). Keys joined the Chris Evert Academy in Boca Raton (Florida) at the age of nine and is now coached by Lindsey Davenport. Diego Sampaolo

Madison reached the quarter final in a WTA Tournament for the first time in her career in Sydney 2013 defeating Lucie Safarova and Zheng Jie before losing to Li Na in three close sets. Keys won her first match against a top-ten when she defeated Li Na in Madrid in 2013. She reached the quarter finals at the Aegon Classic on grass before losing against Agnieszka Radwanska in the third round at Wimbledon. She improved her ranking by 112 places reaching the World Number 37 in the WTA Ranking at the end of 2013.

Keys started the 2014 season with a semifinal in Sydney where she defeated Simona Halep before losing to Angelique Kerber. The US rising star won her first WTA title at Eastbourne defeating two top ten players Jelena Jankovic and Angelique Kerber. She was forced to withdraw from her third round match against Yaroslava Shvedova at Wimbledon due to a leg injury. She finished the 2014 season in 31st place in the WTA Ranking.

Keys, daughter of Rick and Christine who work as attorneys, is now coached by former World Number 1 Lindsey Davenport who guided the teenager to her first Grand Slam semifinal at the Australian Open after beating Casey Dellacqua in three sets in the second round before taking the scalp of last year’s Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova in the third round and winning the match against another Madison (Brengle) in the fourth round. Keys beat Venus Williams in the quarter final in three sets despite a leg injury during the second set. She lost against Serena Williams in the semifinal but confirmed that she has a potential as a future top star. She entered the Australian Open ranked 35 but she will join the top 20 next week (she is projected at Number 20). Serena paid tribute to Keys after their semifinal saying: “It was an honour for me to play against someone who will be the Number 1 in the future. It’s great for me and Venus because we know that finally there are other Americans who are constantly playing well, showing that they want to be the world’s greatest”, said Serena.

Keys fulfilled her life dream when she beat her childhood idol Venus Williams 6-3 4-6 6-4 in the quarter final before losing to Serena in the semifinal. If she had beaten Serena, she would have become the fourth player to beat both Serena and Venus in the same Grand Slam Tournament (the only three players to achieve this feat were Kim Clijsetrs, Martina Hingis and Justine Henin). Madison started playing tennis at the age of four when she watched Venus playing at Wimbledon. Madison asked her parents if she could dress a white dress similar to that Venus was wearing at Wimbledon.

Last November she started working with three-time Grand Slam champion Lindsey Davenport and her husband Jon Leach. It was supposed that Davenport would have worked with Madison during the off-season but the teenager impressed Davenport that the former US star decided to take up her coaching role guiding Madison to the semifinal.

With her first prize money at the age of 14 when she won her first WTA match Madison bought a new mobile phone. With the money earned at the Australian Open she is planning a new handbag. “I told myself, I will go out and buy a Louis Vuitton handbag”, said Madison Keys

Madison Keys signed on as Sports Illustrated Kids Special Correspondent communicating with readers in a series of monthly videos on her life traveling the WTA Circuit. These videos feature her world travels, playing tournament, training and exploring new cities and spending time with her fellow players. She is featured in Sports Illustrated Kids magazine which has over three million readers.

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After Latest Australian Open Win, Naomi Osaka Creates History Once Again

The world No.4 reflects on her current form as she climbs to a new ranking high.

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Naomi Osaka (photo by chryslène caillaud, copyright @Sport Vision)

A straight sets win over Elina Svitolina didn’t just reward Naomi Osaka a place in the semi-finals of the Australian Open, it has also sealed her place in the history books.

The 21-year-old roared to a 6-4, 6-1, victory over an injury-stricken Svitolina, who was bothered by issues with her shoulder and neck throughout the match. Osaka has become the first Japanese woman to reach the last four in Melbourne since Kimiko Date in 1994. Not only that, the victory has secured her a spot in the world’s top 3 next week. Making Osaka the first player from her country – man or woman – to achieve the milestone in the history of the sport.

“This is something that I have been working on a lot, which is trying to get deeper in tournaments more consistently. I think I have been able to do that.” Osaka commented afterwards.
“Right now I just try to keep looking forward. So I’m not really satisfied, I am happy that I’m here (in the semi-finals), but at the same time, I want to keep going. There is more matches to win.”

Already the first player from her country in the Open Era to win a grand slam title in singles, the current world No.4 is eager to add to her collection. Her consistency on the tour has improved in recent months. Since her US Open win, Osaka has reached the semi-finals or better in four out of five tournaments she has played in. The only exception was the WTA Finals where she lost all of her round robin matches.

“You want to do the next big thing. And especially now that I won a Grand Slam, and I feel like I want to win another one, and I’m so close and I just want to keep going.” she said.

Guided on the tour by coach Sascha Bajin, who received the inaugural WTA coach of the Year award in 2018, Osaka credits one thing to her rise – an ‘inner peace.’ In recent time she hasn’t been afraid to express her emotions on the court. Earlier this year at the Brisbane International, the American-based player said she had the ‘worst attitude’ and was ‘sulking’ during her match against Lesia Tsurenko.

It appears Osaka is struggling to find a right balance between showing too much and too little emotion on the court. However, she wants to stick with a more quiet and reserve personality.

“Most people know me for US Open, right? And during the US Open, I didn’t show any emotions most of the time.” She explained.
“When I’m not calm, it just makes my life harder. There is an inner peace I can tap into sometimes during my matches, and it’s kind of hard to get to, but once I’m there, it’s really easy. Not easy, but nothing can really bother me. So that’s just something that I’m trying to learn how to do consistently.” Osaka added.

Osaka is now in sight of the world No.1 ranking. As it currently stands, she will claim the top position unless Petra Kvitova reaches the final or Karolina Pliskova wins the title. If she reaches the final, she will become world No.1 unless Kvitova wins the title. Osaka can also secure the position be winning the Australian Open title.

In the semi-finals, Osaka will take on Pliskova, who knocked Serena Williams out in three sets. She currently trails their head-to-head 1-2.

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Karolina Pliskova Stuns Serena Williams With An Epic Comeback

Serena Willams was trailing by one set and one break. She rolled her right ankle on match point and then went on to dissipate a 5-1 lead in the third set

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Karolina Pliskova - Australian Open 2019 (via Twitter, @AustralianOpen)

It’s one of those matches that fans will remember for a very long time. One of the most incredible collapses by Serena Williams, most certainly impaired by an ankle incident occurred while she was just a few points from the finish line, who squandered a 5-1 lead in the deciding set to lose a match she had recovered after having been down by a set and a break. Karolina Pliskova played an excellent first set, was almost paralyzed by tension when she served up 3-2 in the second set and almost gave the match away in the third. “My mind was in the locker room, but I was still here,” she said immediately after her victory, as while Serena Williams was slowly crumbling in front of her, she managed to keep her cool in a sunny and windy day in Melbourne to pull off this amazing comeback.

The beginning was very cautious for both player: it was a hot day and they both respected each other. Serena’s start was particularly slow, her first serve was at least 20 km/h slower than usual and Pliskova took advantage of it with an early break and a 3-1 lead. The American champion “woke up” at 1-3 0-40 when facing three chances to go down a double break when she put the foot down on her serve and managed not to let her opponent run away in the first set. But it still wasn’t the best Williams, unable to limit her unforced errors and incapable of making a dent in Pliskova’s serve. After 40 minutes of play, the Czech player won the first set 6-4 clinching her fist towards her coach Conchita Martinez in the stands.

Williams continued to struggle on her serve, especially on the “sunny” side of Rod Laver Arena, she had to face break points on the first game of the second set while still unable get any chances to break Pliskova. Another tentative service game for Serena at 2-2 gave Karolina the crucial advantage of a break, but at that point, Pliskova did not have the instinct to kill the match an 8-points to 1 streak got the American back in the game. From that moment, Serena Williams won nine of the following eleven games and looked on her way to her 50th Grand Slam semifinal, when the unexpected happened: what looked like a minor wiggle at William’s right ankle turned out to be the key of the match. One game at a time Pliskova came back from 1-5 down in the third set, brushed off four match points and managed to pull off one of the most surprising comebacks of her career to reach her first Australian Open semifinal.

Karolina Pliskova on Thursday will face Naomi Osaka who defeated Svitolina in two sets.

 

 

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Naomi Osaka Swats Aside Svitolina To Move Ahead In Race For No.1

Naomi Osaka progressed to the Australian Open semi-final and moved ahead in the race for World No.1 with a dominant win over Svitolina.

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Naomi Osaka (Australian Open Twitter account - @AustralianOpen)

Naomi Osaka continued her impressive rise to the top with a commanding 6-4 6-1 win over Elina Svitolina that sealed her place in the Australian Open semi-finals.

The result moves the Japanese player, 21, into pole position in the race for World No.1 and she will stay there unless Petra Kvitova reaches the final or Karolina Pliskova wins the tournament.

The first five games of the opening set of the quarter-final were closely-contested, but both players still held serve without ever being taken to deuce.

All of that changed in the sixth game. Osaka really started to trouble Svitolina with her weight of shot, and the Ukrainian eventually succumbed to the third break point she faced.

The Japanese player surrendered her advantage immediately with a poor service game. Then she re-discovered her rhythm immediately to break Svitolina again.

But the World No.6 justifiably has a reputation as a fighter, and she drew on all her battling qualities to break straight back for the second time in a row.

That made it 5-4 to Osaka, and many would have expected the set to settle down again at this point. It did not happen, as the Japanese player put the Ukrainian’s serve under pressure again to force 0-40 three break points.

Svitolina dug in to save all three but, when she faced a fourth, she netted a backhand and the set went to Osaka.

Osaka races through the second set

Elina Svitolina (photo by chryslène caillaud, copyright @Sport Vision)

The World No.6 completely fell apart on serve in the second game of the second set. Consequently, she rapidly found herself facing a set and 0-3 deficit in the match.

At the changeover, Svitolina called for the trainer because she was suffering from pain in her right shoulder. She received some treatment and then the action continued.

Victory looked almost certain for the reigning US Open champion at this stage. And she cemented that impression when she – incredibly – broke the Ukrainian for the fifth time in succession to make it 4-0.

Osaka had a slight wobble in game five. She made a couple of unforced errors to hand Svitolina a break point.

However, the World No.6 did not take advantage of the chance and, although she finally held serve in game six, she must have known the fight was over.

The Japanese player completed the formalities with a comfortable hold. She finished the match with two aces and a decisive smash and celebrated with a low-key fist-pump and a smile for the crowd.

“I tried to be as consistent as I can,” Osaka said in her post-match interview. “She’s a really great player and it’s unfortunate that she got injured.”

She continued, “Today I just had one goal – to try as hard as I can and not get angry. I didn’t do it well in the last two rounds but I think I did it well this time so I’m really happy with how I played.”

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