A Chat With Thiago Seyboth Wild: The First ATP Champion Born In 2000 And The First Player To Get COVID-19 - UBITENNIS
Connect with us

Media

A Chat With Thiago Seyboth Wild: The First ATP Champion Born In 2000 And The First Player To Get COVID-19

Aged only 20, he’s considered one of the hottest prospects in tennis. His wildest dream: to win the French Open final against Rafa Nadal.

Avatar

Published

on

Ranked 114th in the world, on March 3rd Thiago Seyboth Wild celebrated his 20th birthday, and yet he had already won his first ATP tournament, in Santiago, Chile, right before the tennis action was halted due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Becoming the youngest Brazilian to ever win a tournament, and also the first teenager to win a title after Alex De Minaur’s exploits in Sydney last year. He is coached by Joao Zvetsch and by his father Claudio Ricardo Wild, who manages a tennis academy. His mother, Gisela Christine Seyboth, is a doctor, and he also has a sister named Luana.

 

Thiago is fluent in Portuguese, English, and Spanish. He was born in Marechal Candido Rondon (in the state of Paranà, in the micro-region of Toledo), and moved to Rio at the age of 15. His favourite surface is clay. He’s an avid football fan, supporting Gremio FC and club captain Pedro Geromel. He aspires to play at the same level of intensity shown by his idol Rafa Nadal and defines himself as a brave player when it comes to the key points of the match, even though sometimes he feels he’s too lazy.

VIDEO SCHEDULE

Minute 00:00: His last name “Wild” is not to be read as the identical English word. The letter “W”, in fact, is to be pronounced with a German accent, a clear homage to his roots.
01:30: A recap of his win in Santiago, after he unexpectedly received a wild card to compete in the tournament. Special mention for the match against Garin…
04:50: The win over Ruud. Thiago was down 3-1 15-40 in the final set…
06:00: His coach has some Italian heritage; as a matter of fact, his complete family name is Pinnuzzi Zvetsch.
07:00: Thiago discusses getting infected by the Coronavirus…
08:40: The Covid-19 situation in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
10:00: “I’m not shocked, just very sad. Two friends of mine got Covid-19, but thankfully they’re fine now”.
11.45: His plans for the US Open: would he go or not?
12:00: “I don’t have to many ATP points to defend…”
13:00: He talks about the good bond with fellow brazilians Guga Kuerten, Melo, Bellucci. Where do they usually train?
14:00: Guga Kuerten’s influence. “He’s so popular even outside the tennis world…” Does he know much about Maria Esther Bueno, the greatest Brazilian female player of all time, inducted in the hall of fame in 1987?
16:30: “When I was 12 I went to San Paolo to watch the Brazilian championships and while I was watching Bellucci playing I thought…” Is he already well-known in his home country?
18:00: The biggest difference between Challenger and ATP events.
18:50: His Junior Slam final against an Italian, Lorenzo Musetti.
20:00: I love Nadal, I started watching and playing tennis when he was already the man.”
21:00: “If I could have dinner with three different players, I’d pick…”
21:46: US Open or Roland Garros?
22:00: His playing style: “I like to hit flat, I don’t like players that spin too much the ball 10 feet behind the baseline….”
24:00: “You need to be professional and mature in this circus. I always had tennis as my first priority. I never took a day off in training, even early in the morning, just to go to some party.”
25:00: His thoughts on another Italian, the NextGen champion Jannik Sinner.
27:00: His main goal is easy to understand, just go to 27-minute mark…
28:00: What’s his dream victory? Same as before, watch the video and just know that he has some lofty objectives…
29:00: His favourite shots.
30:00: Aspects of his game that he’s working on. Tennis and chess?
32:00: Watching YouTube videos to scout his opponents.
32:45: His thoughts on the new Davis Cup.
34:00: “My dad played tennis too, I don’t know about his ranking though. He played in Nice, Lille… my parents didn’t really want me to become a professional tennis player, they would rather me to choose a normal life, but it wasn’t my intention.”
35:00: “My parents never forced me to choose any path. I think they’d come to New York if I manage to get to play there.”
36:00: Would he change any rules?
37:00: He finishes the interview in style…

Translated by Antonio Flagiello; edited by Tommaso Villa

Featured

Steve Flink: “Jannik Sinner Will Be a Top 10 Player by the US Open”

The Hall-of-Famer journalist comments on Hurkacz’s surprise win in Miami and previews the clay season. Who was the biggest letdown, Medvedev or Zverev? Nadal will soon be world N.2 again, while Andreescu is striving to stay healthy.

Avatar

Published

on

By

The first Masters 1000 event of the season wrapped up on Sunday, but another already looms in wait in Monte Carlo, and on a different surface. To comment on the situation of the two tours, Ubitennis CEO Ubaldo Scanagatta was joined by his colleague Steve Flink: they focused on Hubert Hurkacz’s surprise win as well as on Jannik Sinner’s great run in Florida – Asheigh Barty’s permanence atop the rankings was also discussed. Here’s their chat:

 

00:00 – The man of the hour is Hubert Hurkacz: “He had an amazing run, defeating five players with a better ranking than his!” What was the key strategy in his final win over Sinner?

07:30 – This was the first Masters 1000 event since 2005 not to feature either Djokovic, Nadal, Federer, or Murray – a wasted chance for Daniil Medvedev? He started as the clear favourite, but his attitude against Bautista Agut left something to be desired…

12.50 – What lies ahead for Sinner? Some of the greatest names in the game did well in Miami in the past – a sign of things to come?

16.20 – Hurkacz betrayed some nerves against Rublev and Sinner, but held on to serve those matches out. Sinner, on the other hand, wasted a 6-5 lead in the opening set – what can he do to improve?

22.50 – Whose great champion does Hurkacz’s serve remind Ubaldo and Steve of? A look at the other players who underperformed in Miami, starting with Tsitsipas and Rublev.

32.00 – “Alexander Bublik reminds me of Safin, he’s an entertainer and he is not boring in press conferences!” What about Sebastian Korda – does he have the mettle of a champion?

40.00 – The women’s tournament: “I expected a great final, but Andreescu was clearly spent – I hope she’ll manage to stay healthy.” Was Osaka’s no-show against Sakkari a worrying sign?

45.30 – If the Canadian is healthy, will she join Osaka and Barty as the defining players of the decade? Who else could make a run to the top?

49.30 – This week, 10 Italian players feature in the ATP Top 100 – will at least one of them feature at the ATP Finals in Turin?

Transcript by Antonio Flagiello; translated and edited by Tommaso Villa

Continue Reading

Media

(VIDEO) Miami Open Final Preview: Jannik Sinner Is The Favourite But Don’t Underestimate Hurkacz

UbiTennis founder Ubaldo Scanagatta analyses the Miami Open final where a brand new Masters 1000 champion will be crowned.

Avatar

Published

on

Jannik Sinner - ATP Miami 2021 (via Twitter, @atptour)

Earlier this year Jannik Sinner and Herbert Hurkacz were on the same side of the court playing doubles on the ATP Tour. However, today in Miami they will be facing off against each other with the biggest title in their careers at stake. Both players have already shown impressive tennis in the tournament with 19-year-old rising star Sinner fighting back from a set down to beat Roberto Bautista Agut in the semi-finals. Meanwhile, Poland’s Hurkacz has beaten three top 10 seeds en route to the final.

 

Continue Reading

Media

Steve Flink: “Naomi Osaka Will Win At Least A Dozen Slams”

The American tennis writer comments on the women’s singles event at the Australian Open. Can Brady win a Major? Is there any hope left for Serena Williams’ quest to clinch her 24th title?

Avatar

Published

on

Naomi Osaka has been crowned as the queen of Melbourne for the second time. The 23-year-old beat Jennifer Brady in the final, conquering her fourth Slam title (all of them on hardcourts), and looks poised to dominate women’s tennis for years. Conversely, current world N.1 Ashleigh Barty couldn’t find her best tennis when she needed it most, bowing out as soon as she met some resistance. These are some of the themes that Ubitennis CEO Ubaldo Scanagatta and his Hall-of-Famer colleague tackled during the second part of their chat.

 

Here’s the video: 

00:00 – “Osaka’s success was hardly a surprise…” 

01:55 – “The only time she struggled was when she had to rally from two match points and a break down against Muguruza in the fourth round – did she raise her level or was it the Spaniard who went missing in the clutch?” 

06:07 – What can the Japanese player still improve in her game? 

09:15 – “I don’t see why she shouldn’t win at the French Open or at Wimbledon as well, although she might struggle a little more on the clay.” How many Majors can she win? 

12:05 – Jen Brady had a dream run to the final despite not being able to train for two weeks prior to the Aussie Slam – can she make it in the future? 

16:34 – “Barty wasn’t able to find her rhythm again after Muchova called an MTO in the second set, that’s too bad because she could have played the final two matches in front of her home crowd.” 

18:28 – “Serena Williams was distraught after her defeat to Osaka, but she had an excellent tournament, beating both Sabalenka and Halep.” Was she perhaps too hard on her chances? 

25:30 – To get her 24th Major, Serena will need to play seven great matches in a row – can she still do it? “My dream is to see a Williams-Osaka match-up in a Wimbledon final…”

31:53 – Was Kenin the biggest letdown of the event? “She had an appendicectomy a few days after the event, and the pressure may have been too much for her, but I think she will keep being a contender for the biggest titles.” 

Transcript and translation by Gianluca Sartori; edited by Tommaso Villa

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending