A Chat With Thiago Seyboth Wild: The First ATP Champion Born In 2000 And The First Player To Get COVID-19 - UBITENNIS
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A Chat With Thiago Seyboth Wild: The First ATP Champion Born In 2000 And The First Player To Get COVID-19

Aged only 20, he’s considered one of the hottest prospects in tennis. His wildest dream: to win the French Open final against Rafa Nadal.

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Ranked 114th in the world, on March 3rd Thiago Seyboth Wild celebrated his 20th birthday, and yet he had already won his first ATP tournament, in Santiago, Chile, right before the tennis action was halted due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Becoming the youngest Brazilian to ever win a tournament, and also the first teenager to win a title after Alex De Minaur’s exploits in Sydney last year. He is coached by Joao Zvetsch and by his father Claudio Ricardo Wild, who manages a tennis academy. His mother, Gisela Christine Seyboth, is a doctor, and he also has a sister named Luana.

 

Thiago is fluent in Portuguese, English, and Spanish. He was born in Marechal Candido Rondon (in the state of Paranà, in the micro-region of Toledo), and moved to Rio at the age of 15. His favourite surface is clay. He’s an avid football fan, supporting Gremio FC and club captain Pedro Geromel. He aspires to play at the same level of intensity shown by his idol Rafa Nadal and defines himself as a brave player when it comes to the key points of the match, even though sometimes he feels he’s too lazy.

VIDEO SCHEDULE

Minute 00:00: His last name “Wild” is not to be read as the identical English word. The letter “W”, in fact, is to be pronounced with a German accent, a clear homage to his roots.
01:30: A recap of his win in Santiago, after he unexpectedly received a wild card to compete in the tournament. Special mention for the match against Garin…
04:50: The win over Ruud. Thiago was down 3-1 15-40 in the final set…
06:00: His coach has some Italian heritage; as a matter of fact, his complete family name is Pinnuzzi Zvetsch.
07:00: Thiago discusses getting infected by the Coronavirus…
08:40: The Covid-19 situation in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
10:00: “I’m not shocked, just very sad. Two friends of mine got Covid-19, but thankfully they’re fine now”.
11.45: His plans for the US Open: would he go or not?
12:00: “I don’t have to many ATP points to defend…”
13:00: He talks about the good bond with fellow brazilians Guga Kuerten, Melo, Bellucci. Where do they usually train?
14:00: Guga Kuerten’s influence. “He’s so popular even outside the tennis world…” Does he know much about Maria Esther Bueno, the greatest Brazilian female player of all time, inducted in the hall of fame in 1987?
16:30: “When I was 12 I went to San Paolo to watch the Brazilian championships and while I was watching Bellucci playing I thought…” Is he already well-known in his home country?
18:00: The biggest difference between Challenger and ATP events.
18:50: His Junior Slam final against an Italian, Lorenzo Musetti.
20:00: I love Nadal, I started watching and playing tennis when he was already the man.”
21:00: “If I could have dinner with three different players, I’d pick…”
21:46: US Open or Roland Garros?
22:00: His playing style: “I like to hit flat, I don’t like players that spin too much the ball 10 feet behind the baseline….”
24:00: “You need to be professional and mature in this circus. I always had tennis as my first priority. I never took a day off in training, even early in the morning, just to go to some party.”
25:00: His thoughts on another Italian, the NextGen champion Jannik Sinner.
27:00: His main goal is easy to understand, just go to 27-minute mark…
28:00: What’s his dream victory? Same as before, watch the video and just know that he has some lofty objectives…
29:00: His favourite shots.
30:00: Aspects of his game that he’s working on. Tennis and chess?
32:00: Watching YouTube videos to scout his opponents.
32:45: His thoughts on the new Davis Cup.
34:00: “My dad played tennis too, I don’t know about his ranking though. He played in Nice, Lille… my parents didn’t really want me to become a professional tennis player, they would rather me to choose a normal life, but it wasn’t my intention.”
35:00: “My parents never forced me to choose any path. I think they’d come to New York if I manage to get to play there.”
36:00: Would he change any rules?
37:00: He finishes the interview in style…

Translated by Antonio Flagiello; edited by Tommaso Villa

Interviews

“We Hope to Convince Federer to Play”: the Presentation of the 2022 Rolex Monte-Carlo Masters

Director Zeljko Franulovic talked about next year’s tournament, scheduled from April 9-17

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Stefanos Tsitsipas - ATP Montecarlo 2021 (ph. Agence Carte Blanche / Réalis)

The 2022 Rolex Monte-Carlo Masters will take place from April 9-17, so it’s difficult to guess what the pandemic situation will be in six months. At the moment, however, the prevalent hypothesis is that all spectators will need a Covid Pass or to bring proof of a negative test before being allowed in the Montecarlo Country Club at Roquebrune, France. If some players will refuse the vaccine, then they will need to be tested regularly in accordance to the rules devised by the French government.

 

Other than that, there will be no surprises when it comes to the event’s logistics, since the Country Club has already added a new players lounge and a new press room in the past few years. In 2020 the tournament was cancelled, while in 2021 it took place behind closed doors (while still being televised in 113 countries); the last edition staged with a crowd, in 2019, sold 130,000 tickets, constituting 30% of the total revenue – another 30% came from the sponsors, 30% from media rights (a number that tournament director Zeljko Franulovic hopes to see increase) and 10% from merchandising.

While it’s early days to know whether the tournament will operate at full capacity, Franulovic has made it clear that the organisers are already planning to provide a better covering for the No.2 Court, whose roof has not been at all effective in the past in the event of rain.

The tournament’s tickets can be bought on the official website of the event, but Franulovic has already vowed to reimburse immediately every ticket “if the government and the health authorities should decide to reduce the tournament’s capacity.”

Ticket prices have increased by 2 to 3 percent as compared to 2019, ranging from £25-50 for the qualifiers weekend, £32-75 for the opening rounds, £…-130 for the quarterfinals and semifinals, £65-150 for the final, £360-1250 for a nine-day tickets. Franulovic claims that the prices are in line with those of the other Masters 1000 tournaments.

Finally, Franulovic supports Andrea Gaudenzi’s decision to create a fixed prize money for the next decade. While tournaments like Madrid and Rome are trying to increase their duration from 8 to 12 days, the Monte-Carlo director has claimed that he prefers to remain a week-long event, especially because his is not a combined tournament. As for the players who will feature, Franulovic hopes to convince Roger Federer to participate: “I’m certain that he will give everything he has to be able to stage another comeback on the tour, ma no one knows where he’ll play. However, I think that on the clay he should opt for best-of-three events like Monte-Carlo and Rome rather than the French Open.”

For this and more information, you can watch the video above.

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Grand Slam

US Open, Steve Flink: “Djokovic’s loss had more to do with fatigue than pressure”

A recap of the last Major of 2021, from Raducanu’s triumphant journey to Berrettini and Zverev’s improvements. What was Rod Laver’s prediction for the men’s finals?

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The 2021 US Open was historical from many points of view, starting with the full-capacity crowd coming back to Flushing Meadows. On court, we witnessed Djokovic’s bid for a Calendar Year Grand Slam fall short against Daniil Medvedev in the final, while Emma Raducanu took the tennis world by storm, winning as a qualifier and without dropping a set. These were just some of the topics of the tournament recap by Hall-of-Famer Steve Flink and Ubitennis CEO Ubaldo Scanagatta. Here’s their chat:

 

00:00 – Emma Raducanu’s historical feat: “She had an easier draw than Fernandez, who had to defeat many great players, but she was very impressive nonetheless!”

06:18 – Barty and Osaka’s premature exits: “Hadn’t she lost to Rogers, Barty would have won the whole thing…”

09:35 – Was Fernandez too tired during the final?

20:17 – The Canadian defeated Aryna Sabalenka, who once again missed out on a big chance: “She seems to have a split personality…”

25:24 – The men’s final – how distant was Djokovic from his best form?

28:59 – “Djokovic is the best at handling the pressure, I don’t think that was the main reason behind his defeat…”

35:05 – Was the crowd actually on Nole’s side or did they just want to witness history being made?

39:16 – What was the secret behind Medvedev’s winning tactics?

41:50 – Djokovic fell short of the Grand Slam in a similar way to Serena Williams – how similar are their performances?

50:16 – Rod Laver’s prediction for the final…

52:25 – Who is the best claycourt player, Djokovic or Federer?

55:05 – Carlos Alcaraz won over the hearts of the crowd – how quickly will he reach the Top 10?

56:29 – Is Zverev on the right track to win a Major? What about Berrettini and Sinner?

62:48 – The Canadians: who will have a better career between Shapovalov and Auger-Aliassime?

Transcript by Giuseppe Di Paola; translated and edited by Tommaso Villa

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Grand Slam

US Open, Steve Flink on the Murray-Tsitsipas Controversy

A recap of the first week of the last Major of 2021: will Djokovic clinch the Grand Slam? Who will win the women’s title with Barty and Osaka out of the picture?

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The 2021 US Open has reached its halfway point, with many wonderful five-setters and a few upsets. Ubitennis CEO Ubaldo Scanagatta discussed the events of the first week with Hall-of-Fame tennis writer Steve Flink, from the elimination of Barty and Osaka to the toilet break controversy involving Stefanos Tsitsipas, from Alcaraz’s breakout performance to the chances of Novak Djokovic to complete a Calendar Year Grand Slam. Here’s their chat:

 

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