The 10 Highest Prize Money Earners Of 2019 In Tennis - UBITENNIS
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The 10 Highest Prize Money Earners Of 2019 In Tennis

Ubitennis takes a close look at the biggest earners in the world of tennis this year.

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Six out of the seven highest earners on a tennis court this year has been on the men’s tour, according to data provided by the ATP Tour and WTA Tour.

 

Ubitennis has compared the prize money winners of both the men’s and women’s elite to get an overall picture of the divide between the sexes. The findings are based on the prize money players have earned from the start of this year until November 25th and doesn’t factor in any other financial incentives such as endorsements.

Whilst there has been equal prize money in every grand slam tournament since the 2007 Wimbledon Championships, Ash Barty is the only woman to make more than $7 million this year, compared to six on the men’s tour. The reason is due to a variety of factors. First of all, there has been a more even distribution of winners of the WTA Tour whilst their men’s equivalent is still dominated by the Big Three. Furthermore, the earnings available at tournaments throughout the season differ, making it hard to draw a conclusion to the divide.

“The ATP (the men’s tennis international governing body) and the WTA (the women’s international governing body) are two separate tours with distinct tournament structures, calendars, and funding models.” The website of the Citi Open outlines.
“Tournament like ours (ATP/WTA Washington) that offer both men’s and women’s tennis do not always combine events with the same tour tier levels. This results in the difference in prize money and international television coverage, which is among the considerations that dictate court schedules.’
“For example, the China Open features a WTA Premier mandatory event with an ATP World Tour 500-level event. The prize money, in this instance, is higher for the women’s event because of the difference in the tour tier levels.”

So who has won the most money and what was their most profitable tournament? Here is a list of the top prize money winners of 2019.

1. Rafael Nadal $16,349,586

As well as becoming the oldest year-end No.1 player in the Open Era on the ATP Tour, 33-year-old Nadal has also earned more than anybody. His four titles have been across two grand slams and two Masters 1000 events.

A closer look into Nadal’s earnings highlights how instrumental grand slams are in earnings. His triumphs at the French Open and the US Open equates to $6.15M alone or 37.6% of what he has earned this year. Which would get him inside the 2019 top 10 highest earners even if he didn’t win any money elsewhere.

It was at the US Open where he earned the most after leaving the tournament with an extra $3.85 million.

2. Novak Djokovic $13,277,228

Despite not winning the most grand slam titles or spending the most weeks as world No.1, Djokovic remains the highest earning tennis player of all time in terms of prize money. He is the only player to exceed the $130M mark and is on the verge of cracking $140M in 2020.

This year, the Serbian won five titles overall with two of those being at Wimbledon and the Australian Open. However, the earnings from those titles differ and explains why he is not ahead of Nadal, who won just one more match than him this season. For example the Japan Open trophy only rewarded him with $430,000.

3.Ash Barty $11,307,587

Australia’s Barty is the only female to feature in the top five after what has been a career-best season. Overall, she has won four titles. Including her maiden grand slam trophy at the French Open back in June.

The principle reason as to why Barty has fared so well in the list is due to the fact she won the WTA Finals, which had a record prize money pool. She exited the tournament with a ludicrous payment of $4,420,000 for playing five matches, including one she lost in the round-robin format. Amounting to almost 40% of her annual salary.

In comparison, Barty’s first grand slam triumph rewarded her with $2,649,464.

4.Roger Federer $8,716,975

2019 saw 20-time grand slam champion Federer return to the clay for the first time in four years. Whilst he didn’t win a trophy, it did enable him to claim almost an extra $900,000 for playing in three clay-court events.

The 38-year-old clinched a quartet of titles this year with Miami being the highest category event. However, it was at Wimbledon where he would make the most money. After losing to Djokovic in a five-set thriller in the title match, he left with just under $1.5M in earnings.

Federer earned $1M or more in two out of 14 events he played in this season. However, he remains the highest paid tennis player in the world due to his endorsements. Which Forbes Magazine estimates to be in the region of $86M.

5.Dominic Thiem $7,836,322

Besides Djokovic, 26-year-old Thiem is the only person this season to have won five titles on the ATP Tour. The most prestigious being in Indian Wells where he clinched his first ever Masters 1000 trophy. Which is where he won roughly one sixth of his earnings this season.

Another big earner for the Austrian was at the season-ending ATP Finals. Despite one round-robin loss before he finished runner-up to Stefanos Tsitsipas in the final, Thiem still managed to make $1.3M. Making it his second highest earning event of 2019.

Thiem, who is the highest-earning Austrian tennis player in history, participated in seven finals this season. So far in his career, he has made just over $22M in prize money.

6.Daniil Medvedev $7,833,320

Russia’s Medvedev can put his place in the top 10 down to a sensational run following the Wimbledon Championships. Within a three-month period he reached six consecutive finals on the tour. Making an impressive $5,307,420 which equates to 68% of his yearly earnings.

2019 has seen the 23-year-old achieved a series of firsts in his career. His first Masters title, first appearance in a grand slam final (US Open) and a debut at the ATP Finals. Unfortunately Medvedev failed to win a match in London. He has also recorded eight wins over top 10 players this year.

7.Stefanos Tsitsipas $7,272,204

Greek sensation Tsitsipas wouldn’t have cracked the top 10 list if he hadn’t of exceeded expectations at the ATP Finals. A Dramatic win over Thiem saw him win the biggest title of his career yet and raise hopes that he could be a contender at the grand slams next year. In London he won 36% of his 2019 prize money ($2,656,000).

Overall, Tsitsipas has participated in six finals and has won three titles. Also triumphing on clay in Estoril and on a hard court in Marseille. Furthermore, he also made 920,000 (Australian dollars) following his run to the Australian Open semi-finals.

8.Simona Halep $6,962,442

Halep’s clinical win over Serena Williams in the Wimbledon final wasn’t just a big confidence boost, it also did wonders to her bank balance. In fact, her payment of $3,041,463 was nearly half of what she has made this season (44%).

Wimbledon was the only tournament where the Romanian won silverware, but she did finish runner-up in both Doha and Madrid. Overall, Halep posted a win-loss record of 43-16 on the tour to finish in the year-end top five for the sixth time in a row.

9.Naomi Osaka $6,788,282

It has been a roller-coaster journey for Naomi Osaka. Who became the first Asian player in history to reach world No.1 whilst struggling to deal with a surge in media interest and a change of coach.

Nevertheless, the Japanese player managed to win the Australian Open, as well as tournaments in Osaka and Beijing. Earning a total of $4,715,214 in what amounts to 70% of her yearly earnings.

Should Osaka win $2.3 million or more in the future, she would overtake Li Na to become the most successful Asian tennis player of all time in terms of prize money won. Something the 22-year-old seem destined to do.

10.Bianca Andreescu $6,504,150

WTA breakout Bianca Andreescu is arguably the most impressive figure in the top 10. She started 2019 outside the top 100 and with career earnings amounting to less than $200,000.

This all changed thanks to her meteoric rise in the sport. Her triumphs include winning titles in Indian Wells, the Rogers Cup and the US Open. To put that into perspective, the trio rewarded the Canadian with 88% of her yearly earnings.

It is also important to note that due to injury, Andreescu at one stage only managed to play in one tournament over a four-month period.

Note: figures are in US dollars unless otherwise stated

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Jamie Murray Speaks Out On Wimbledon Dilemma

The two-time mixed doubles champion shares his thoughts about the current situation and the problems that could arise.

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Former world No.1 doubles player Jamie Murray says he is unsure how much longer Wimbledon can be delayed this season ahead of a crucial meeting on its future next week.

 

The All England Club is set to hold an emergency meeting to make a final decision as to what to do with this year’s tournament. Including the possibility of cancelling the event for the first time since 1945. The tennis calendar has been brought to a standstill due to the covid-19 pandemic. There have been more than 500,000 cases of Coronavirus worldwide, according to John Hopkins University.

Speaking about Wimbledon’s potential decision during an interview with BBC Scotland’s The Nine, Murray admits that organisers face a difficult decision. Saying it would pose as a big challenge for them to reschedule the event. Both the ATP and WTA are currently reviewing their calendars with the French Open now taking place a week after the US Open.

“I don’t know how long they could push it back,” said Murray.
“They’re desperate to have their event on, it’s still over three months away and a lot can change in that time,” he added.

Murray has featured in the doubles main draw at Wimbledon every year since his debut back in 2006. He has won the Mixed doubles trophy twice in 2007 (with Jelena Jankovic) and 2017 (with Martina Hingis). The 34-year-old currently has a doubles ranking of 34th.

“For them, optics don’t necessarily look great, I guess, if there’s sporting events all over the world getting cancelled and they’re trying to crack on with things.” He commented on the scheduling difficulties.
“There’s a lot of other stakeholders, a lot of other tournaments to consider. Even things like daylight for the tournament. Once the tournament gets put back, there’s less and less daylight. When you play at Wimbledon normally, you can play until 10 at night.”

The UK is currently in a lockdown with members of the public only allowed to leave their houses for specific reasons. Furthermore, 1.5 million people have been advised to self-isolate for 12 weeks. The government is hopeful that they can flatten the spread of the disease within this period, which is extremely close to the Wimbledon start date.

According to AFP News, any decision to scrap this year’s tournament is likely to have a massive financial impact. Between 2017-2018 Wimbledon made an estimated pre-tax profit of $52 million with over 90% of that invested back into British tennis. Furthermore, the BBC could also suffer a big blow. It is reported that the broadcaster pays in the region of $72 million for the TV rights.

It is unclear as to what day the decision will be made next week. Since its creation in 1877, Wimbledon has been cancelled a total of 10 times before. All of which happened during the first world war (1915-1918) and second (1940-1945). The event has never been delayed or scrapped during peacetime.

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Resumption Of ATP Tour Uncertain, Admits Chairman

The chief of the men’s tennis tour has issued an update concerning the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

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It is still uncertain that the men’s tour will resume on the date previously set out due to the ongoing Coronavirus threat, according to one of the chiefs of men’s tennis.

 

ATP chairman Andrea Gaudenzi has provided a date about the current situation in a statement. At present both the ATP and WTA Tours have been suspended until June 7th in a joint agreement by the two. A decision that has wiped out the entire European clay court swing and triggered the French Open to be controversially delayed until September. No top-level tournament have taken place since the last week of February.

“Unfortunately, the repercussions from the COVID-19 pandemic are being felt across all areas of society, as well as by our players, tournaments, and the Tour,” Gaudenzi said in a statement on Tuesday. “This is bigger than any sport. The current situation raises many questions which we empathize with greatly, and we are working hard on evaluating all options.
“Our ability to address any supportive measures will be best guided once we know the duration of the crisis and when the Tour will resume, which remains unknown at this time. This remains an evolving situation that will require significant time to deal with in the coming weeks and months, and we must avoid making any rushed decisions without knowing first when the crisis will end. Understanding the full duration and scale of this crisis will be critical to addressing any measures related to its repercussions.”

At present the next tournaments on the men’s calendar are in Estoril, Portugal and Munich, Germany. Although both of those are still up in the air. In Portugal their premier football league has been cancelled until further notice and there have been more than 2000 cases of covid-19. Although that number is significantly less than other countries, their health care system is already under pressure. Meanwhile, Germany has implemented strict measures.

There are also fears over if Wimbledon will be able to go ahead as planned. The UK is currently in a lockdown for an estimated three weeks. That will take it up to roughly April 15th if there isn’t any further extension. It is expected that a final decision by the All England Club will be made next month. Although they reportedly ruled out the idea of moving the event into the slot that was filled by the Olympics, which will now take place in 2021.

“Sources at the All England Club suggested on Tuesday that, amid the huge uncertainty, it makes little sense now to postpone The Championships from their current start date of June 29,” the Daily Mail reports.
“The delayed window is not considered significant enough extra time to warrant the enormous upheaval of rescheduling the big fortnight. For now the official policy is to stick with the current arrangements, even though major sports events are falling like nine pins.”

Gaudenzi, who is a former player himself, has stated that all grass-court events are currently on the ATP calendar as planned. However, it is possible that this could change in the coming days due to the unpredictability of Covid-19.

“We continue to assess all options related to preserving and maximising the calendar based on various return dates for the Tour. It goes without saying that full cooperation with the other governing bodies is essential. We are in close discussion with all the grass-court events and they remain on the calendar as scheduled at this time,” he said.
“The reality is this is a rapidly evolving situation and there is no option other than to take this day-by-day and week-by-week.”

Throughout the suspension, the ATP rankings have been frozen. An approach the WTA has also taken.

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Murray Brothers Still Hoping To Play Wimbledon Together

The British duo are hoping to one day join forces at their home grand slam, but is isn’t as simple as that.

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Former world No.1 doubles player Jamie Murray admits that there is still a sense of uncertainty surrounding the comeback of his brother Andy to the ATP Tour.

 

The 34-year-old has revealed that he and his brother are hoping that they will be able to join forces at Wimbledon one year before one of them retires from the sport. Jamie is just a year older than Andy. The two have never played together in a grand slam before. Their last last tournament played was at the 2019 Washington Open.

“We don’t know what will happen with Andy’s hip but we hope he’s going to get back fit and healthy and get back on to the court,” Jamie told the Scotsman.
“I haven’t seen him for a while – this break will give us the chance to catch up – but I know he’s been practising which is good news.
“We’ve always said we wanted to play Wimbledon one time together before we stop and hopefully we’ll get that chance.”

Three-time grand slam champion Andy hasn’t played a competitive match since the Davis Cup finals last November. He has been sidelined from the tour due to what was initially thought to be pelvic bruising. Although it is now believed that the discomfort he has been experiencing in the groin area is related to soft tissue growing around his metal hip. The medical term is called heterotopic ossification, which is defined as an abnormal growth of bone in the non-skeletal tissues.

It is the latest blow for the injury-stricken player, who has also undergone two surgeries on his hip in a bid to prolong his career. In a recent interview with Amazon prime, Andy admitted that he was ‘thinking the worst’ with the prospect of being forced to go under the knife once again. At present this is not the case with the Brit currently continuing his rehabilitation.

“It’s been difficult, the emotional ups and downs of just not knowing what’s going on and then being given potential worst case scenarios and thinking this might be it.” He said.
“You go into scans thinking if you get the wrong news from this then it’s done. So it’s hard from that respect, but thankfully that’s been really good.
“I’ve been practicing on these courts the last couple of weeks and been feeling quite well. Practiced two, two-and-a-half hours some days and it’s [the injury] has been responding well so fingers crossed it stays that way.”

Former top five player Tim Henman recently watched Andy in action during a training session. Describing his play as ‘hitting the ball well’ before adding that he is ‘building up his strength all the time.’ Andy has won 46 ATP titles and spent 41 consecutive weeks as world No.1

Due to the suspension of the tour, it is unclear as to when either of the Murray brothers will be returning to action. This year’s Wimbledon Championships are also in doubt due to the Covid-19 pandemic with a final decision on the event being played set to be made next month.

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