Madison Keys: “Have had some problems with that part of my leg. So it was kind of an overwhelming moment. It was kind of scary” - UBITENNIS
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Madison Keys: “Have had some problems with that part of my leg. So it was kind of an overwhelming moment. It was kind of scary”

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TENNIS AUSTRALIAN OPEN – 28th of January 2015. M.Keys d. V.Williams 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. An interview with Madison Keys

 

Q. Tell us how you were feeling 1-4 down in the second, off the court getting treatment.

MADISON KEYS: It was definitely kind of a flashback to Wimbledon for me. Have had some problems with that part of my leg. So it was kind of an overwhelming moment. It was kind of scary. But luckily was able to catch it before I did any real damage to it. You know, luckily the painkillers and adrenaline in the end kind of helped me get through it.

Q. Did you feel it on that backhand you hit? Did you feel it coming into this match at all?

MADISON KEYS: I felt it since the beginning. It’s been tight, but it’s been something that, you know, with some treatment it’s been fine. Then one shot in the match, all of a sudden I felt it kind of really get tight. I thought I was close to pulling it. So at that moment, you know, I ignored it at Wimbledon, and, you know, tore it, which ultimately made me have to withdraw. At that moment it was kind of a panic of, I need to get some tape on this so I don’t do that again.

Q. How does it feel now?

MADISON KEYS: It still hurts. Definitely going to be getting some treatment on that. Hoping I can get it as good as possible for tomorrow.

Q. Is it your thigh particularly? What’s the actual injury?

MADISON KEYS: My left adductor.

Q. How do you think you will cope mentally carrying that injury going into the biggest match of your life?

MADISON KEYS: I mean, I think it’s one of those things where all of us have dealt with injuries before. It’s one of those things where it’s probably going to hurt, I’m probably going to have tape on it, but I’m just going to do my absolute best and enjoy the moment.

Q. You’re the third 19-year-old in a row to make the semifinals here. Eugenie did it last year; Sloane did it the year before that. Did those runs at all make you think this was possible?

MADISON KEYS: I think Genie and Sloane are both really talented and can play some really good tennis. It’s not super surprising they made semifinals. But, no, it’s one of those things when you see some of your fellow peers doing well, going deep in tournaments, it’s inspirational. Makes you kind of believe that you can do the same.

Q. Did you get the sense you could kind of break her serve at will?

MADISON KEYS: I don’t think ‘at will’. I wish I could have done that. She still has an amazing serve. She’s still an amazing player. So at that point it was harder for me to serve. I felt like it was becoming easier for her to break me. So I felt towards the end I really had to focus on the return games a lot more and really making balls and trying to get as many points as possible.

Q. The winners count was 30-14 in your favor. Did you consciously resolve to go for it even more after the injury?

MADISON KEYS: Yeah, at that point I knew I couldn’t run as much. I knew if I was going to get stretched out it was going to be more painful. It was kind of that thing if you have it, go for it, because I’m probably not going to last that long in a rally. That’s kind of what I did.

Q. Talk about how Lindsay prepared you for this match today, what kinds of things she told you last night or this morning to get you ready.

MADISON KEYS: I mean, she obviously played Venus a couple of times. She was just saying that she’s going to have great serves; she’s going to have great shots. It’s one of those things where when she starts playing really well, you can’t panic or get too far ahead of yourself. Really just stay focused on you and just do your best. Constantly try to keep some pressure on her.

Q. Your form was a little was a little bit up and down coming in I guess end of last year. Can you pinpoint a moment where it all turned around? I guess maybe the start of the second set against Casey here?

MADISON KEYS: Yeah, I mean, I’ve had some good wins; I’ve had some bad losses. That’s been my goal for the year, just being more consistent. Even playing badly, not being horrible. But, I mean, I think I’ve just kind of figured it out a little bit more. Just been more consistent and playing better. I don’t think it was specifically one point. I think it’s just getting better and better over time.

Q. You talked on the court about the moment of playing Venus. What would it be like to play Venus in the quarterfinal and Serena in the semifinal?

MADISON KEYS: I mean, I have a feeling that’s what’s going to happen. I can tell you tomorrow.

Q. How do you prepare for Serena? You haven’t played her before. Obviously No. 1, top American, 18-time Grand Slam champion? How to you begin to attack all those things?

MADISON KEYS: It’s just one of those things where I have to go out and I have to do my best and I have to really just have to stay focused on my side of the court, because she’s obviously very, very good and she’s going to play very well. So if I get too focused on what she’s doing I think I can kind of let the moment get away from me. So I’m just really going to stay focused on myself.

Q. With the power and such a flat ball that you possess, when you go out there do you always feel the match is off your racquet?

MADISON KEYS: I don’t think so. I think against Petra and I think against Venus there was a lot of back-and-forth rallies where they had the edge, as well. I’m trying to have more matches where it’s off of my racquet, where I’m dictating, but I don’t think it’s my match.

Q. Aren’t you supposed to have two coaches this year?

MADISON KEYS: Originally Lindsay was going to help me out until I could find a full-time coach, and then she decided she really liked it and could figure something out.

Q. That’s why it didn’t work out with Wim?

MADISON KEYS: Yeah, it was just too many voices and things like that. Then Lindsay decided that she could make it more of a full-time thing.

Interviews

(EXCLUSIVE) Kim Clijsters Is ‘Done’ With Professional Tennis And This Is What She Wants To Do Next

The former world No.1 sheds some light on her future during an interview with Ubitennis at The All England club.

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Kim Clijsters (image via twitter.com/wtainsider

It is her love for tennis that has spurred Kim Clijsters to continue playing as a professional player for as long as possible. 

 

The 39-year-old announced her third retirement from the sport earlier this year after her latest comeback. Troubled by injury and having her schedule affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Belgian played only five tournaments between 2020-2022 and lost her opening match at all of them. Although three of those matches went the full distance. 

Clijsters has returned to Wimbledon this year once again but officially as a member of the legends contingent. A group of former players who play in events designated for them.

So what is the future plan for a Clijsters who has rightfully embedded her name in the sport as one of the best in recent years? During her career, she has won 41 WTA titles, spent 19 weeks as world No.1 and is the only player to have defeated the Williams sisters at multiple events (2002 WTA Championships and the 2009 US Open). 

Speaking to Ubitennis at The All England Club, Clijsters hints that she may one day like to return to the Tour but not as a player….

UBITENNIS: How does it feel to be back at Wimbledon?

CLIJSTERS: It feels great. It’s always a special place to come back to. I haven’t been here for a few years and a lot of the infrastructure has changed. For me to be back here and see the legends and players I remember watching when I was younger is so much fun. Once you stop playing there are not a lot of people who understand the life that you have had. Then when you come and see everybody it is so natural. This was my family for years and years. You don’t see it as a family then but as you get older you do. 

UBITENNIS: You recently retired from the sport. Is that you totally done now or is there still a temptation to come back?

CLIJSTERS: I’m done, done, done…. I do like to play legends tennis. I still love tennis and like to play every day if I can but with three kids it is a little complicated. It is still my passion and I love watching the sport. 

UBITENNIS: So now you’re retired, what’s next?

CLIJSTERS: I think I do (want to work in tennis). The passion started for me when I was a little girl and I still believe I can help here and there. Whether it is helping the younger players that are playing at this stage. 
There are definitely things I would like to do but with family life, traveling many weeks a year is complicated. But I do like to stay involved in tennis. 

UBITENNIS: Who would be your dream player to coach?

CLIJSTERS: That is a tough question. maybe a younger player…

UBITENNIS: Emma Raducanu?

CLIJSTERS: Yea, a younger player. Amanda Anisimova and the girls who want to get to that next stage. Those who you have a connection with personality-wise. It’s tough to pick one out of the hat right now but I think that trust and connection on a personal level are really important if you want to get to the next step (as a player). 

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Grand Slam

(EXCLUSIVE) Former Wimbledon Champion Marion Bartoli On Why Tennis Needs Nick Kyrgios

The former world No.7 spoke to Ubitennis about the Australian star who has sensationally been charged with assault.

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Marion Bartoli (left) pictured at the 2022 Wimbledon Centre Court 100 year celebration - image https://twitter.com/bartoli_marion

Marion Bartoli believes tennis needs a ‘disruptor’ like Nick Kyrgios in order to break the trend of similar personalities on the Tour.

Bartoli, who won the 2013 Wimbledon title, spoke to Ubitennis during an hour-long media session that took place at The All England Club on Tuesday morning. A large talking point of the tournament so far has been the roller-coaster behavior of Kyrgios during two of his matches. In the first round, he was issued with a fine for unsportsmanlike conduct after arguing with officials and spitting in front of some members of the crowd who were ‘disrespecting him.’ Then during a dramatic third round clash with Stefanos Tsitsipas, he once again argued with officials and even questioned why his opponent wasn’t defaulted from their match after hitting the ball into the stands.

The Australian is undoubtedly a divisive character. However, Bartoli believes that is exactly what tennis needs. 

 

“You either like him or you don’t. He will not make you feel middle ranged about him,” Bartoli tells Ubitennis.
“We need people like this in tennis. Some sort of disruptor with a different character. I don’t think it is good to have everyone acting the same way.’

“The limit is when you start to go against the umpire but he brings something new and different which is exciting for the game.”

Although not everybody has the same viewpoint. During his press conference on Saturday night, Tsitsipas stunned reporters when he branded his peer a bully due to his antics. Something Kyrgios denies. The Greek has also said he supports some sort of intervention to address the behavior of the world No.40 if such an opportunity occurs. 

“He said what he felt on the court and that’s fair. You just have to respect that,” Bartoli comments on Tsitsipas.
“At the end of the day we know what Nick is bringing to the court and it is not really surprising. It was almost as if Stefanos looked surprised by that which for me is something I wouldn’t have expected from him.”

Controversy aside, Kyrgios is looking to be a major danger in the tournament as long as his shoulder holds up. It is the first time he has reached the last eight of the tournament since 2014 after beating Brandon Nakashima in five sets on Monday. In his section of the draw, he faces unseeded Cristian Garin next, followed by a potential clash with Rafael Nadal. 

It was Kyrgios’ latest performance which has drawn praise from Bartoli.

“I think he has been doing extremely well this year, tennis-wise. He got a lot of confidence playing well on the grass before Wimbledon and he just loves the show,” she said.
“He loves the center stage and the way he played (against Nakashima) was brilliant. He didn’t go out way too much into his extreme where he would talk out loud all the time. It was just about his tennis. He’s always so exciting and he’s a great addition to the championships.“

As our discussion about the tennis star took place, sensational news broke that Kyrgios has been charged with assaulting his ex-girlfriend. The Canberra Times has reported that the assault took place last year and he is set to go to court next month. If he is found guilty, he could go to prison. 

Pick for the women’s final

As for the women’s draw, Bartoli has her money on two particular individuals. Although it is Tunisia’s Ons Jabeur who she is tipping to win the title. The second seed is yet to contest a Grand Slam final in her career. 

Meanwhile, 2019 champion Simona Halep is gaining momentum in the tournament. After struggling with injury and confidence issues in recent months, the Romanian is yet to drop a set in four matches played. 

“Ons Jabeur is playing great tennis. She was my pick to win the Wimbledon title. I think Simona Halep has been extremely impressive, the way she won against Badosa was really quite something. Those two should be the ones going through to the final but in this year’s championship there have been so many upsets you never know.” Bartoli commented.

Bartoli is playing in the mixed-doubles legends draw at Wimbledon alongside Nenad Zimonjic. On Sunday she was one of many former champions to take part in a special ceremony marking the 100th anniversary of Center Court. 

“It feels amazing. I get to be back on center court with my fellow other champions. That was definitely the highlight of my championships so far,” she said.
”To see roger, Rafa, Novak, etc, all the lineup of incredible champions, for me to be part of that group picture was something I would never forget.“
“Wimbledon is by far my favorite place in the world. For me, every year to wear my purple badge and walk through those gates is absolutely amazing.”

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Interviews

(EXCLUSIVE) Mats Wilander on Sinner’s Chances of Beating Alcaraz, Kyrgios’ Antics At Wimbledon

Ubitennis caught up with the former world no.1 for a brief chat on Sunday morning.

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Mats Wilander says changes should be made to the rules following a controversial third round meeting between Nick Kyrgios and Stefanos Tsitsipas at Wimbledon. 

 

The Saturday night encounter was marred by controversy with the Australian arguing with the umpire and swearing. Meanwhile, his Greek rival received a point penalty for hitting a ball into the crowd out of anger. Following their clash, Tsitsipas sensationally accused his rival of bullying. 

Wilander spoke about the incident during a discussion with Ubitennis’ founder Ubaldo Scanagatta where he also previewed Jannik Sinner’s clash with Carlos Alcaraz at SW19. 

The full interview can be read below:-

UBITENNIS: What do you think about the chances of Jannik Sinner against Carlos Alcaraz?

WILANDER: First of all, I thought Jannik was going to have a much bigger problem with John Isner. Then I saw his match and he is playing unbelievably well. He’s incredibly aggressive and doesn’t make mistakes. 

UBITENNIS: But Alcaraz is also very agressive?

WILANDER: Yes, he is serving well and moving better than Jannik. But Jannik is older and we don’t know what the thing is between them. Just like Stefanos Tsitsipas and Nick Kyrgios. We don’t know what it was when they were like 10,11, 12.. in practice. 

Maybe Jannik use to beat Alcaraz all the time in practice? This psychology is way more important than tennis (in their upcoming match), in my opinion. 

This is exactly what happened with Tsitsipas and Kyrgios, Zverev and Kyrgios. He (Kyrgios) beats them almost all the time because they have this respect and he is a couple of years older. 

UBITENNIS: Carlos has more variety than Sinner

WILANDER: He is more inconsistent, he is a little bit faster and has more options. But more options are not how Novak Djokovic won Wimbledon. The fewer options you have in big matches the easier it is to play your game. So for Alcaraz, can he get the drop shots right? Can he get the serve and volley right? Can he hit the right forehand at the right time? 

(But) Jannik goes in at the right time. So if Alcaraz played great he’s the favorite but when have we seen him play great in a big match (at Wimbledon)? We don’t know yet that he has only played two-out-of-three set matches. Maybe he did against Tsitsipas at the US Open but this is a different level.

UBITENNIS: Who was right in the Tsitsipas and Kyrgios argument? 

WILANDER: They both have a point, to be honest. Kyrgios said that Stefanos must be a bit soft mentally if he gets that bothered by him being himself. 

I would say the one to blame is the officials. They are playing within the rules we have now so you can’t blame them, they are trying to win a tennis match. This is what Kyrgios plays like, this is what he does. If you fall for it, then you need to improve your mental stability. At the same time, I would have also felt as Stefanos did. 

I think (the problem) lies with the official situation. I am not saying they could have done anything (during the third round match) but we need to put rules in place so they can’t do this. We don’t have tennis matches that look like that. I know the crowd loved it but tennis needs to be a sport where you can take your five-year-old and not worry about them getting hit with a tennis ball or hearing a player swearing loudly 20 times. The sport needs to be like that otherwise the sport is becoming entertainment and that is not what tennis is. it is a sport, it’s educational and inspirational more than entertainment. 

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