The 2020 ATP Finals: How Do The Title Contenders Compare? - UBITENNIS
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The 2020 ATP Finals: How Do The Title Contenders Compare?

UbiTennis looks at the figures behind the eight men who have qualified for this year’s end-of-season tournament.

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The O2 Arena, venue of the ATP World Tour Finals (photo by Alberto Pezzali)

After a year that has been marred by the COVID-19 pandemic the top performing players on the ATP Tour head to London to fight for the prestigious ATP Finals title.

 

The season-ending round-robin showdown features the eight highest scoring players on the ATP Tour in relation to how many points they have earned within a certain period. At stake is the potential to earn up to $1,564,000 and 1500 ranking points should a player triumph without losing a match. The prize money may be down compared to 12 months ago due to the pandemic, but the desire to win is no less.

On Thursday players were assigned to their groups, which has been named in honour of the 50th anniversary of the tournament. In Group Tokyo 1970 top seed Novak Djokovic is joined by Daniil Medvedev, Alexander Zverev and Diego Schwartzman. A particularly humourous draw for Argentina’s Schwartzman who previously named his ideal group during an interview with La Nacion without mentioning any of those players. Meanwhile, in Group London 2020 Rafael Nadal has been drawn with Dominic Thiem, Stefanos Tsitsipas and Andrey Rublev.

Ahead of the first day of action on Sunday, here is a guide to everything you need to know about this year’s title contenders.

The head-to-head

DjokovicMedvedevZverevSchwartzmanNadalThiemTsitsipasRublev
Djokovic4-23-25-029-277-44-20-0
Medvedev2-42-54-00-31-35-13-0
Zverev2-35-22-22-52-81-54-0
Schwartzman0-50-42-21-103-61-12-2
Nadal27-293-05-210-19-55-11-0
Thiem4-73-18-26-35-94-32-2
Tsitsipas2-41-55-11-11-53-42-2
Rublev0-00-30-42-20-12-22-2

Number of ATP matches won

Group Tokyo 1970

Name2020careerTotal % ATP Wins
Djokovic39-3932-19083.06%
Medvedev23-10154-8664.16%
Zverev27-9250-12367.02%
Schwartzman25-12168-14054.54%


Group London 2020

Name2020careerTotal % ATP Wins
Nadal25-51002-20283.22%
Thiem22-7297-15565.70%
Tsitsipas28-12132-7464.07%
Rublev40-8131-8760.09%

Most titles won

2020
1) Rublev – FIVE (Vienna, St. Petersburg, Hamburg, Adelaide, Doha)
2) Djokovic – FOUR (Rome, Cincinnati, Dubai, Australian Open)
=3) Nadal – TWO (Roland Garros, Acapulco)           
=3) Zverev – TWO (Cologne 1, Cologne 2)
=4) Thiem – ONE (US Open)
=4) Tsitsipas – ONE (Marseille)
=4) Medvedev – ONE (Paris)
5) Schwartzman – NONE 

Career
1) Nadal – 86
2) Djokovic – 81
3) Thiem – 17
4) Zverev – 13
5) Medvedev – 8
6) Rublev – 7
7) Tsitsipas – 5
8) Schwartzman – 3

Best Grand Slam performance

  • Nadal – shares the record for most Grand Slam singles titles won with Roger Federer at 20. 13 of those wins were on the clay at the French Open.
  • Djokovic – 17-time champion and has won the Australian Open more times than any other male player in history.
  • Thiem – won his first title at the US Open this year and has reached the final at three other majors.
  • Medvedev – best run was to the final of the 2019 US Open where he took Nadal to five sets before losing.
  • Tsitsipas – semi-finalist at the 2019 Australian Open and 2020 French Open.
  • Zverev – runner-up to Thiem at this year’s US Open where he lead the final by two sets to love. Also reached the semi-finals of the Australian Open in January. 
  • Rublev – Reached the quarter-finals of two majors within the same season for the first time this year. Also reached the last eight of the 2017 US Open.
  • Schwartzman – At the 2020 French Open he reached the semi-finals in what was his 25th Grand Slam main draw appearance. 


2020 results

AUS OPENFRA OPEN WIMBLEDONUS OPEN
DjokovicWRUCANCELLEDR4*
MedvedevR4R1CANCELLEDSF
ZverevSFR4CANCELLEDRU
SchwartzmanR4SFCANCELLEDR1
NadalQFWCANCELLEDDID NOT PLAY
ThiemRUQFCANCELLEDW
TsitsipasR3SFCANCELLEDR3
RublevR4QFCANCELLEDQF

Prize money won

2020
1) Djokovic – $6,052,233
2) Thiem – $5,169,756
3) Nadal – $3,422,202
4) Zverev – $2,973,966
5) Medvedev – $2,058,891
6) Rublev – $1,917,865
7) Tsitsipas – $1,800,450
8) Schwartzman – $1,432,369

Career
1) Djokovic – $145,197,177
2) Nadal – $123,023,764
3) Thiem – $27,302,125
4) Zverev – $23,002,531
5) Medvedev – $12,566,584
6) Tsitsipas – $12,226,057
7) Schwartzman – $8,965,129
8) Rublev – $6,360,124

ATP Finals record

  • Djokovic = win-loss of 36-14
    World No.1 Djokovic is seeking to become only the second player in history to win the tournament for a sixth time after Federer.
  • Nadal = win-loss of 18-14
    The king of clay is chasing after his first ever title at the year-end showdown. The last Spanish man to win the trophy was Àlex Corretja in 1998.
  • Thiem = win-loss record of 6-8
    The Austrian is seeking to go one better than last year and win the title. However, in three out of his four previous appearances he has failed to go beyond the round-robin stage.
  • Zverev = win-loss of 7-5
    Won the biggest title of his career at the event back in 2018. He was also a semi-finalist last year. 
  • Medvedev = win-loss record of 0-3
    After a disappointing debut last year, Medvedev will be seeking his first win of any sort at the event. The last Russian player to win the ATP Finals was Nikolay Davydenko in 2009. 
  • Tsitsipas = win-loss of 4-1
    Won the tournament on his debut last year. Tsitsipas is seeking to be the first player outside of the Big Three to defend a title at the ATP Finals since Lleyton Hewitt in 2002. 
  • Rublev = win-loss of 0-0
    Will be making his debut at the age of 23. He is the first Russian player to have won five ATP titles within the same season since 2009.
  • Schwartzman = win-loss of 0-0
    The 28-year-old clinched the final spot for this year’s tournament. He is the eighth Argentinian to play at the ATP Finals and first since Juan Martin del Potro back in 2013. 

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Novak Djokovic Storms Into Wimbledon Third Round For 16th Time

The top seed dealt with the breezy conditions and his Australian opponent with ease in what was largely a one-sided performance.

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Novak Djokovic (SRB) - Credit: AELTC/Joe Toth

Novak Djokovic has sent out a warning to this year’s men’s draw at Wimbledon by producing a clinical win over Thanasi Kokkinakis to reach the third round on Wednesday.

 

The world No.3 dictated proceedings throughout his 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, triumph over Kokkinakis. A player who is currently 79th in the world that has been hampered by injury issues throughout a large chunk of his tennis career. Djokovic has now won 307 Grand Slam main draw matches and a staggering 1007 at Tour level. The latest performance saw him produce a total of 29 winners against 14 unforced errors

“I’m very happy with my performance today. I thought I started with well, I was very solid from the back of the court,” said Djokovic.
“I tried to make him work a lot around the court and brought a lot of variety into the game.’
“It was not easy to serve because of the wind but from my side overall it was a really high-quality performance and I’m very pleased.”

In what was their first Tour meeting in seven years the reigning champion got off to a dream start against an erratic Kokkinakis. The Australian struggled to control his unforced error count early on which resulted in him getting broken in his opening service game. Meanwhile, Djokovic settled in instantly as he worked his way to a 3-0 advantage with relative ease. A couple games later the double break was sealed with the use of a delicate drop shot which Kokkinakis failed to return over the net. He went on to close the set out yet another carefully placed drop shot. 

Contending with strong gusts of wind, as well as Kokkinakis’ speedy serve, Djokovic broke once again early in the second frame with a winning volley at the net. Despite glimmers of impressive shot-making from his opponent, it failed to materialize into any momentum as the Serbian eased to a two-set lead. Down 3-5 Kokkinakis valiantly saved four set points to hold serve. However, Djokovic proceeded to seal the two-set lead in the following game.

Djokovic’s relentless hitting overwhelmed his opponent who looked growingly lost on the court. The start of set three saw a 12-minute Kokkinakis service game where the Australian buckled once again whilst under intense pressure. Strolling to a game from victory, Djokovic closed out the match with a serve out wide that Kokkinakis returned out.

It is the 16th time in Djokovic’s career he has reached the last 32 at SW19 and his 13th in a row. Only Jimmy Conors has achieved a longer run of 14 between 1972-1985. In total, he has won 81 matches at Wimbledon which is the third-highest tally for a male player in history. 

“I’m quite pleased with the way I have raised my level within two days,” said Djokovic who defeated Kwon Soon-woo in the first round. 
“Hopefully I can keep that trajectory and keep getting better as the tournament progresses.”

Djokovic will play compatriot Miomir Kecmanović in the third round. He leads their head-to-head 2-0. 

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(EXCLUSIVE) Ricardas Berankis’ Coach On Wimbledon Showdown With Rafael Nadal

Dirk Hordorff speaks to UbiTennis about the world No.106 and his chances against the second seed.

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Ricarcas Berankis at Wimbledon (image via http://www.yonex.co.uk/_assets/)

Ricardas Berankis is no stranger to Wimbledon as he marks the 12th anniversary of his first-ever main draw win at the tournament after coming through three rounds of qualifying.

 

A stand-out player in his younger years, the Lithuanian topped the world junior rankings and won the US Open boys title back in 2007 when he defeated Jerzy Janowicz in the final. Transitioning to the pro level was never straightforward for Berankis who is now 32-year-old. Nevertheless, he has made his impression on the Tour with runs to two ATP Tour finals in 2012 (Los Angeles) and 2017 (Moscow). He also won the 2015 US Men’s Clay Court doubles title in Houston alongside Teymuraz Gabashvili.

Today Berankis is ranked 106th in the world, which is 56 places below his career-high. His best performance on the ATP Tour so far this season was in Abu Dubai when he came through qualifying to reach the quarter-finals before losing to Denis Shapovalov. He also reached the final of a Challenger event in Lille.

At Wimbledon this year he started his campaign with a straight-sets win over former semifinalist Sam Querrey. Making it only the fourth time in his career he has won a main draw match at the tournament. His reward is a showdown on Thursday with the formidable Rafael Nadal who is seeking a historic 23rd major title and his third in a row. Nadal defeated Francisco Cerundolo in his opening match.

So can Berankis trouble Nadal on the grass?

The best person to ask is Germany’s Dirk Hordorff who coaches Berankis. The veteran coach has also previously collaborated with the likes of Rainer Schuettler, Lars Burgsmüller, Yen-Hsun Lu, Kristian Pless, Sergiy Stakhovsky, and Vasek Pospisil.

During an email exchange with UbiTennis, Hordorff shared his thoughts about Berankis’ upcoming clash with Nadal.

UBITENNIS: It wasn’t until Melbourne this year that Ricardas played Nadal on the Tour for the first time. He lost the match 6-2, 7-5. What did his team learn from that experience?

HIRDORFF: I was not in Melbourne, but I coached unsuccessfully in a lot of matches against Rafa. He is next to Novak (Djokovic) over so many years as a true champion and a great person outside the court. You learn every match against him and Ricardas is ready for this match.

UBITENNIS: When it comes to playing a member of the Big Three, how do you as a coach go about dealing with Berankis’ mentality?

HIRDORFF: Ricardas played a good first round against Sam Querrey. Nevertheless, to play Rafa is a different issue. You need to concentrate on your abilities and not worry about history.

UBITENNIS: Nadal was sternly tested during his opening match. Does this in any way give a confidence boost towards Berankis or do you think it is irrelevant?

HIRDORFF: Every match starts at zero. What Rafa played yesterday doesn’t affect Ricardas’ match. Anyway, Rafa won his first round quite solidly against a good upcoming player.

UBITENNIS: Whilst the odds might be against Ricardas, it isn’t impossible that he could defeat Nadal. What will the key areas be for him to focus on during their match? (e.g. return position, use of slice etc).

HIRDORFF: Ricardas needs to focus on his abilities and take his fine form from the first round in this match. Rafa is a complete player, so you need to perform well in all aspects of the game.

UBITENNIS: What is the most difficult thing about playing Nadal on the tour?

HORDORFF: He is a complete player with a lot of special strengths. Strong serve, good backhand, fast, perfect coordinate and no weak parts in his game.

UBITENNIS: Ricardas might be 32 but he has shown some good results on the Tour (runner-up at a Challenger event in Lille and QF in Dubai). Given the trend of players playing later into their careers, is his best yet to come?

HIRDORFF: Ricardas had to deal with a lot of health problems. I am sure that the best part of his career is yet to come for him.

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Rafael Nadal Survives Scare In Wimbledon Opener

Bidding to win his third slam in a row, the Spaniard experienced a tougher test than he expected.

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Rafael Nadal’s bid for a first Wimbledon title in over a decade has got off to a shaky start after he battled his way past Argentina’s Francisco Cerundolo in the first round.

Nadal was unable to tame the world No.41 throughout his rollercoaster 6-4, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4,  victory which is his 306th in the main draw of a Grand Slam. Cerundolo exceeded expectations by playing some inspired tennis for a player who has only ever won one Tour-level match on the grass and had never won a main draw match at a major.

 

All the credit to Fran, I think he started to play great and he was a very tough opponent,” said Nadal.
It has been three years since I last played on this amazing surface and I’m happy to be back. For me, it’s always amazing to play on their court (Center Court) and I can’t thank the crowd enough for their support. 

The showdown was the first real test for the Spaniard since his historic triumph at the French Open which he won for a record 14th time. Since then, he hasn’t played any ATP grass-court events leading up to Wimbledon. Although he did take part in an exhibition event at the Hurlingham Club. Furthermore, he had undergone a new medical procedure in a bid to solve the pain caused by his long-term foot condition.

“It’s not the surface we play very often, especially in my case due to different reasons. For the last three years, I haven’t stepped onto a grass court so it always takes a while,” the 22-time Grand Slam winner commented.
Today has been an important test, especially at the start of the tournament and the difficult circumstances I arrived in.

It was by no means a vintage performance from the former world No.1 who struggled behind his second serve by winning just 43% of those points. Furthermore, he hit a total of 23 winners against 41 unforced errors. At one stage he was facing the prospect of going into a fifth set after falling behind 2-4 in the fourth frame before upping his intensity to claim four games in a row and clinch the match.

“It’s obvious when you play well in Roland Garros there is not much time between (that and Wimbledon). I used to remember the beautiful days when I used to win Roland Garros and then play on grass at Queen’s the next day but my body doesn’t allow me to do this anymore so I have to take some days off,” he admits.
“The most important thing for me is that I am at Wimbledon 2022 and I won my first match.”

Nadal will play Ricardas Berankis in the second round.

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