‘My Body Was Cracking And Popping’ - Danielle Collins Opens Up On Arthritis Diagnosis - UBITENNIS
Connect with us

Latest news

‘My Body Was Cracking And Popping’ – Danielle Collins Opens Up On Arthritis Diagnosis

The former Australian Open semi-finals speaks out about how the pain related to the autoimmune condition has affected her.

Published

on

American tennis star Danielle Collins said she struggled to fold her own clothes in the lead-up to her rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis due to the intense pain she was feeling in her hands.

 

The 26-year-old announced last October that she has been diagnosed with the autoimmune condition that causes pain and swelling in numerous joints of her body. Collins’ revelation came just eight months after her fairytale run at the Australian Open where she reached the semi-finals whilst ranked outside the world’s top 30. Although at the time it was a new diagnosis for the world No.51, she believed she had been suffering from symptoms for many years.

“While in college I would get sick all the time. My college coaches were always pushing me to see doctors and stay on top of it because the health challenges they saw I was constantly facing.” Collins wrote for behindtheracquet.com.
“No one could figure it out. I continued to get bloodwork every two months and nothing came of it. During this time I had wrist surgery, a meniscus tear and a lot of joint related issues.’
“Orthopedics diagnosed me with tendonitis. Unfortunately I think there were many times many of my symptoms were pushed under the rug because I was an athlete.”

A former star of college tennis in his home country where she won two NCAA singles titles, Collins was initially dismissive that she could be suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis due to her age. Although the condition does run in her family with her grandmother also suffering from it. According to the British National Health Service, women and those with a family history of the condition are most at risk of developing it.

“I pushed it off for a long time,” she admits. “ Periodically I would get bad joint pain, around my menstrual cycle, and it would be debilitating.’
“I would have a hard time getting out of bed and on the worst days would sleep for 15 hours straight. I constantly felt drowsy and tired. The weird thing is I got accustomed to feeling this way. I forgot what it was like to feel healthy and energetic.”

It was last summer where Collins said she reached ‘the last straw.’ Following her Australian Open breakthrough, her results of the tour towards the end of the season dropped significantly. Out of her last 11 tournaments played that year, she managed to win back-to-back matches in only one of them.

Following more checks, she was finally given the diagnosis shortly after her second round loss at the US Open.

“They found normal bloodwork with erosion in my neck, hands and feet, which was consistent with RA. It took a lot of bloodwork to rule out other diseases, such as lupus, but they finally diagnosed me with RA after the US Open,” Collins remembers.
“I have been on two different medications since then that have worked very well. I have mixed that with a pretty strict diet.” She added.

Collins is not the first tennis star to have the condition. Another is Caroline Wozniacki who discovered that she had it back in 2018. The Dane continued playing for another year before retiring from the tour. Although her decision was not due to her health.

Prior to the Tour suspension, Collins had enjoyed a solid start to 2020. Reaching the semi-finals of two Premier 700 events in Brisbane and Adelaide. However, she crashed out in the second round of the Australian Open to Yulia Putintseva. Now getting back on track, she hopes her story will hope inspire others.

“I didn’t want people calling me sick or let this disease define me. I had to take my situation and find the positives. I have moved forward in many areas the last few months but it still makes me nervous to think I may be a role model for others. I’m not the most outspoken person but I am working on being more comfortable with trying to help others through my experiences.” She concludes.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Latest news

Kim Clijsters starts the World Team Tennis tournament with a win over Bernarda Pera

Published

on

Former world number 1 and multiple Grand Slam champion Kim Cljisters made a winning start to her 2020 World Team Tennis campaign with a 5-2 win over US player Bernarda Pera. World team Tennis is a mixed gender professional tennis league played with a team format in the United States.

 

The Belgian player rallied from 0-40 down twice and won two of three deciding points to seal the win. The 2020 World Team Tennis season will be the 45th season of the league and features nine teams and each team will play a 14-match regular-season schedule.

Clijsters has won 41 WTA singles titles and 11 doubles titles and lifted three WTA Tour Championships. She has won the Australian Open singles title in 2011 and three US titles in 2005, 2009 and 2010 and two Grand Slam doubles titles at Roland Garros and Wimbledon in 2003.

Cljisters retired from tennis in 2007 at the age of 23 to start a family. She made her come-back in 2009 and won her second US Open title as unranked player in just her third tournament of the comeback. Kim won her back-to-back title at the US Open in 2010 and the Australian Open in 2011. She became the first mother to be ranked world number 1 by the WTA. She holds the record for most Grand Slam singles titles won as a mother and was the first to win one since Evonne Goolagong Cawley in 1980.

Clijsters retired again after the 2012 US Open.

Cljisters returned to professional tennis at the Dubai Tennis Championships more than seven years of retirement. She lost to Garbine Muguruza in the opening round.

Cljisters is determined to return on the court after the WTA Tour was suspended since March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“The most important lesson for me is to trust the process. It does not mean because COVID happened that I am not interested in playing more tennis. There are some challenges and combining parenting at home and teaching the kids at home and still going to practice and things like that, so it was challenging but at the same time you get through that together”, said Cljisters.

 

Several precautions are in place at the World Team Tennis to avoid the risk of contracting Covid-19. No more than 500 spectators are allowed inside the 2500-seat stadium.

Continue Reading

Latest news

Angelique Kerber suggests she won’t travel to New York

Published

on

Three-time Grand Slam champion Angelique Kerber suggested she won’t travel even if the US Open gets the go-ahead.

 

The US Open organizers are determined to hold their tournament despite the restrictions imposed to fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

The German star says travelling to New York to play at the US Open is the last thing she wants to do due to the coronavirus crisis.

“As of today, I say quite honestly, I cannot imagine it. I don’t think anyone wants to get in a plane and fly to New York. At the moment no one knows what’s happening and how it will go on. I have the greatest respect that I or a member of my team could be infected and we are stuck without knowing how to proceed”, said Kerber.

Kerber is not optimistic that the WTA Tour will resume according to plan.

“Who knows, perhaps we will not play tennis in the next two years. It’s hard to say. We will also start again in three weeks”, said Kerber.

Daria Gavrilova said that she needs to play the US Open for financial reasons. The Australian tennis player has not played since the US Open last year due to injury and the shutdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

“For me it’s important to make a living, to make some money. We have a choice. Personally I like to know that I have an opportunity to play and earn, but I feel like the players just don’t want to make a tough decision and maybe would feel a relief if the tournament is cancelled”, said Gavrilova.

Continue Reading

ATP

REPORT: Japanese Tennis Association To Lose One Billion Yen In 2020

The loss of a key men’s event in the country has resulted in millions of dollars being loss in revenue.

Published

on

Venue of the 2019 Mens Japan Open (image via https://twitter.com/rakutenopen)

The cancellation of a premier tennis event in Japan due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is set to have a massive financial impact on the country’s governing body.

 

Last month organisers made the decision to scrap the Rakuten Japan Open Tennis Championships this year amid fears of a second wave of the virus in October when the it is set to take place. The tournament is currently categorised as an ATP 500 event and has been held annually since 1973. In 2019 Novak Djokovic won the tournament for the first time in his career without dropping a single set throughout. Other previous winners also include Roger Federer (2006), Rafael Nadal (2010) and Andy Murray (2011).

“Given concerns about a second wave of the infection both in Japan and overseas, we came to the anguished conclusion that we had to cancel,” organisers said in a statement.

It has been estimated that as a result of the move, the Japanese Tennis Association (JTA) will lose millions of dollars in revenue. National news agency Kyodo has estimated the loss to be at least 1 billion Yen ($9.4 million) based on this event alone and no others.

JTA executive director Naohiro Kawatei told Kyodo that moving athletes in and out of the country is problematic due to the current situation. Tokyo has recently raised it’s Coronavirus alert level to the top of a four-point scale after there have been more than 100 new daily cases of the virus in the city for six days in a row. Furthermore, The Bank of Japan has revised down their growth forecasts.

“In addition to players coming from overseas, it is the responsibility of organizers to facilitate their departure, so there are some differences between our sport and others,” said Kawatei.

At present the women’s top tournament in the country is still on the 2020 schedule. The Pan Pacific Open, which is classed as a Premier event, is currently set to take place during the week commencing November 2nd.

Recently the Asian swing of the tennis season has been thrown into jeopardy after the Chinese General Administration of Sports recommended that no sports events take place in the country unless they are related to Olympic qualification. Although sports federations, including both the ATP and WTA, are seeking clarity from officials before they make their next move. China is usually where the majority of Asian tennis events are played, including the WTA Finals.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending