EXCLUSIVE: Gilles Muller Talks Injury, Confidence Issues And Retirement Plans - UBITENNIS
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EXCLUSIVE: Gilles Muller Talks Injury, Confidence Issues And Retirement Plans

The player who knocked Rafael Nadal out of Wimbledon last year looks at the present and to the future during a special interview with Ubitennis.

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LONDON: Blessed with one of the most effective serves on the tour, Gilles Muller’s first round win at The Fever-Tree Championships appeared routine. Until you look at the wider picture.

The 35-year-old veteran is currently ranked 46th in the world. Prior to this week, he had only managed to win one match in six tournaments. Suffering most of his losses to players ranked outside the top 50. His losing streak came to an end at Queen’s following a tense 7-6(7), 7-6(6), triumph over Denis Shapovalov. Muller claimed the victory with the help of his blistering serve, firing a total of 13 aces and winning 96% of the points behind his first serve.

“It wasn’t the best performance that is for sure. It is never easy to start a new tournament. It’s the first round and you have to get used to the court.” Muller told Ubitennis.net afterwards.
“It wasn’t easy, especially after not winning many matches. So I can’t say my confidence is high.
“I’m very pleased to have won it.”

Monday’s clash with the Canadian Next Gen star was very much a match of fine margins. During the opening set Muller missed out on three chances to clinch a 7-5 lead, before snatching the tiebreaker with the help of a Shapovalov forehand into the net. Then a case of Deja vu occurred in the second with both players remaining resilient behind their serve. Nevertheless, Muller managed to seal victory on his third match point after a return of the Shapovalov serve forced the Canadian to produce an unforced error.

“The serve today was working quite well. That always helps, especially against a guy like Denis, who is always hitting the ball very hard from the baseline. Once we were in a rally it was very hard to take control because he was hitting the ball so hard.” He evaluated.
“It was always important to dictate the points from my serve onwards and that was working quite well today.“

The injury woes

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A lot has changed over the past 18 months. 2017 was a year filled with delight and heartbreak for 6’3” Muller. After ending a 15-year wait for an ATP title at the Sydney International, he claimed his second five months later in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. Then at Wimbledon he downed Rafael Nadal 15-13 in a five-set marathon encounter. Finally the Luxembourg No.1 was on the up. That was until an elbow injury cut short his season. An issue that continues to hinder him.

“To be honest, my elbow isn’t 100 per cent. I’m always trying to find a way to be fit for the matches and not work too hard outside of the matches.” Muller openly admits.
“It is tough to find that balance and I haven’t found it yet.”

In order to continue playing, a plan has been implemented. Muller conducts daily treatment on his elbow, which may need attention multiple times during some days. Earning $5.79 Million in prize money throughout his career, he has ability to to hire a Physio to travel with him. Although it is more a necessity than a luxury.

“I have treatments every day, a couple times a day. I’m travelling with a Physio because otherwise I think it wouldn’t be possible to play.”

Fortunately, he can seek solace in the fact that he is playing during one of his favorite times of the year. The grass is the perfect surface for Muller to capitalize on his service game.

“It’s the nicest moment of the year when the clay (season) finishes and I’m ready to play on the grass. This year I haven’t had the best start on the grass. But with the win today my confidence is going up and I hopefully be able to keep on performing like I have done today.” He reflected.

Life after tennis

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Muller is a late bloomer on the tour. Not winning his maiden ATP title until the age of 33. He is one of the growing numbers of players playing later in their careers. Although he knows that he is approaching the finishing stages of his career. When he made his ATP debut back in 2002, Shapovalov was just three-years-old.

So what does the future hold for him? Muller confirms that he has been thinking about his retirement, but remains committed to playing for now. As to what they might be, he is aiming to one day elevate the sporting profile of his home country. According to the ATP, Luxemburg has two plays of the official ranking system. Muller at 46 and Alex Knaff at 1283.

“I’m not sure yet. Obviously I want to stay in sport.” He said about his future retirement.
“Try to help develop a program in Luxembourg that can be helpful for young kids to fulfil their dreams in sport.”

Addressing why the talent in his country remains so limited. Muller has his own interpretation. For him, it is not due to ability. Insisting that the structure to guide young athletes “is not right.” Something he hopes to correct in the future.

“I think we have a lack of young athletes that believe in themselves. There is talent, but they never believe in themselves. I think I can help change that.” He explained.

Muller will resume his campaign at Queen’s on Wednesday where he will take on top seed Marin Cilic. Regardless of the outcome, he already feels like a winner given his recent misfortunes.

“I’m just trying to enjoy today’s victory. I haven’t thought about the next match. I just want to go home, watch football and relax.” He concluded in an upbeat manor.

Interviews

EXCLUSIVE: ‘I’ve Been Contacted By 200 Players’ – Tennis Chief Hordorff On Why The Transition Tour Must Change

The vice-president of the German Tennis Federation (DTB) has spoken with Ubitennis about the state of the lower level tournaments in the sport.

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The newly created ITF transition Tour was set out to give players a better standard of living and cut down the costs for tournaments hosting lower level events. On the surface, the idea is a brilliant one welcomed by many. But in reality, the outcome has been one of anger and frustration.

This year a new system is in place with ITF rankings being used for the first time. WTA points are only awarded to women playing in events that have $25,000 in prize money or more. In men’s tennis, $25,000 ITF Pro Circuit events offer both ATP ranking points (later rounds) and ITF Entry Points (all rounds); while the qualifying rounds of ATP Challenger tournaments also offer both ATP ranking points (all events) and ITF Entry Points (events up to $125,000 in prize money). Players can use their ITF ranking to enter into professional tournaments.

There is a growing frustration among players with many saying that it is harder for them to get into tournaments compared to 12 months ago. Some of those have even lost their ranking from last year due to the size of the tour being reduced. On top of that, the draws have also been made smaller.

Dirk Hordorff is one of the most vocal critics of the changes. The vice-president of the German Tennis Federation has extensive experience within the sport. Besides his position as vice-president, Hordorff has worked with players such as Rainer Schuettler, Yen-Hsun and has been a Davis Cup coach for Taiwan. Today, he is working as a mentor to both Janko Tipsarevic and Vasek Pospisil.

“Right now I am in Thailand on the challenger Tour. Every day players or Coaches are coming to me, telling me they are reading my posts on Facebook and tell me how grateful they are and how much they support my point of view.” Hordorff told Ubitennis.
“Also in Germany lots of players are having the same Problems and contacting me. There is a Facebook petition against the ITF changes where over 10000 persons already signed.
“It’s very clear that all players are suffering under this new System and don’t like it.”

To be more precise about the problem, Hordorff has said he has received a staggering 200 messages from players about their concerns. Either they are in a worse situation, can’t get into tournaments or are struggling financially. It seems that the ITF Tour is becoming more like a boulevard of broken dreams for many players.

“The number of places for players to participate in these tournaments is limited, so players with no ranking or bad ranking have no chance to participate in the tournaments.” He said.
“I’ve heard from a lot of players flying around the world, going to tournaments and couldn’t get in in reason of the limited qualification size.”

It isn’t all doom and gloom with it comes to the circuit. Many accept that under the reform it is easier for junior players to make it onto the professional circuit at a young age. Should they generate enough ITF Points. However, the older a player develops the more difficulty they face.

“For players in the ITF top 50 it may be an easier way to get into the pro circuit with Wild Cards or free places on World Tour Tournaments.” Said Hordorff.
“The pathway from juniors to pro Tennis is one good point of this Reform. On the other side, if you don’t make it earlier in the junior career the way to the pro Tennis is incredibly difficult or even there is no chance. This needs to be changed.”

The Data sales Argument

Last week, both the ITF and ATP issued statements to Ubitennis after claims made about data sales. In a Facebook post, Hordorff said the ITF refused to accept an offer made by the ATP in relation to ranking points on the men’s tour. He alleged that the ATP was willing to offer ranking points to tournaments at every level. The only condition was for the ITF to not sell their data to betting companies. In accordance to a recommendation set out be the Independent Review Panel (IRP).

“The ATP supports the IRP’s recommendation to remove the supply of data at the lowest level of professional tennis, however, this is not related to the award or allocation of ATP ranking points.” An ATP spokesman said.

Responding to the statement, Hordorff remains defiant. Saying that Chris Kermode, who is the CEO of the ATP Tour, was willing to provide ATP points to all tournaments. However, it has been claimed by Ross Hutchins that the ITF never wanted those points. Hutchins is the Chief Player Officer for the ATP.

“The official Statement of Chris Kermode at the ATP Meeting before 30 tournament directors was, that the ATP was willing to provide points, but the ITF didn’t want to have points. After the Orlando Meeting he commented, that the ITF position, that the ATP took from the futures the points away, is false and not true at all. This was confirmed last week by Ross Hutchins, that the ITF didn’t want ATP points. Why you think the ITF had this position? But if you take it word for word, there is no proof that ATP didn’t want the stop of data selling against points.”

Data sales refers to the selling of live data from tournaments (e.g. live scores of matches). The reason why the IRP recommended for it to be banned is to help tackle match-fixing at the lower level tournaments. Since 2012, the ITF has had a multi-million pound deal with Sportradar. A company that analyses and collects sports data. In the terms of the contract, the company is allowed to provide live data from all tournaments linked to the ITF.

What is next?

Whilst there is an uproar among players and coaches, it is unlikely the ITF Transition Tour will be abolished. Besides the large amount of time it took to construct the concept, it would be a PR disaster for the Governing body. However, that doesn’t mean it can’t be modified.

When Hordorff was questioned about what he would do differently, the German outlined four key areas. Ranging from the size of the draws to the ranking system. His views are similar to that of Dave Miley, who is seeking the ITF Presidency position later this year.

“I believe that one of our Goals in Leadership in Tennis should be to promote the game, let more People play Tennis, grow the Sport.” He said. “This Transition tour is the complete opposite. it Limits players to participate and have a negative Impact to the players, the Coaches, to academies, Clubs around the world. There is a change needed.”

Hordorff’s four changes
– Increase qualifying draws to a minimum of 64
– Remove the new entry fee to help players financially
– Abide by the IRP recommendation and abolish data sales
– Abolish the two ranking systems and return them back into one

So where do we go now? Should players just accept their current situation and get on with it, or is change actually achievable? The answer to that question is unclear. In theory the ITF could be forced to adjust their structure should enough tennis federations voice their concerns and vote. However, it may not be as simple as this.

“The Nation Tennis associations should have the power to make changes happen. Latest they can vote a new board at the AGM in Portugal this year, which will change this Reform and take care of the interest of the players and tournaments.” Hordorff explained.
“There are to many persons involved, who have no Knowledge about Tennis and only take care of their personal interest.” He added.

The ITF AGM meeting will not take place until the end of September. Until then, players will have to continue weathering the storm in the meantime. Meanwhile, the ITF has pledged to continue their support of their Transition Tour by holding a media conference to promote it in the coming weeks.

The second part of Ubitennis’ interview with Hordorff concerning the Davis Cup and David Haggerty will be published on Wednesday.

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Davis Cup

EXCLUSIVE: Former Davis Cup Heroes Speak Out On New Changes To Competition

Ubitennis speaks with Mats Wilander, Thomas Enqvist and Mark Woodforde about the new format of the team competition.

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This weekend will see the start of a new era in men’s tennis as the revamped Davis Cup kicks off with the qualifying rounds taking place.

24 teams will battle it out for 12 places in the final of the competition in what is the new format of the event. Following approval at the ITF AGM in August, for the first time in history the finals of the competition will take place in one location over a week. A total of 18 teams are set to take part – 12 qualifiers, the four semi-finalists from the previous year and two wild cards.

The transformation has been far from simple with some players and their national association’s voicing opposition. Critics argue that the changes are too radical, ruins the tradition of the 119-year-old event, the scheduling eats into the off-season and the financial pledges that has been made are dubious. Investment firm Kosmos has pledged to invest $3 billion over a 25-year period with a promise that countries would receive more money. Something that has previously been disputed by the head of Tennis Europe.

Perhaps the best way to gage an idea of the current situation is to consult with those who has played in the competition for years. Thomas Enqvist has had the opportunity of being both player and captain for his country. The Swede compiled a win-loss record of 15-11 in the competition and won both of his singles matches during the 1996 final.

“Speaking from a player point of view, I think that all of us would say that it is a big honour to represent your country. My best memories in tennis come from the Davis Cup.” Enqvist told Ubitennis.

Sweden was one of the countries that voted for the revamp of the competition, according to a list published by the vice-president of the German Tennis Federation. The ITF never published a list of the countries that voted for or against the plans. Arguing that this was done for confidentiality reasons. Nevertheless, 44-year-old Enqvist is remaining cautiously optimistic about the changes. Arguing that people need to wait and see before they can judge.

“I think we have to give them time. We have to see. They have tried to put something on to make sure that all the top major players can play. Hopefully it’s going to be a good choice.” He said.

For Mats Wilander, the Davis Cup is one of the biggest events in a player’s career. Wilander is a former world No.1 player, who represented his country in 27 ties over a 14-year period. He helped secure the Davis Cup trophy in the final of the competition three times throughout the 1980s.

“The only reason why I am playing tennis is because of the Davis Cup.” Wilander states.
“The effect the Davis Cup has had on pretty much every player that is here today. My generation, the generation before and the generation after. The effect of the Davis Cup is much bigger than the effect of grand slams because you are watching your nation play.”

The ATP threat

If the changes aren’t enough to contend with, a new tournament poses as a potential threat to the existence of the historic competition. 2020 will see the resurrection of the World Team Cup. Overseen by the ATP,  who governs men’s tennis, the event has on offer ranking points and a prize money pool of $15 million. The tournament will be held at the start of each year, less than two months after the Davis Cup finals, in three cities across Australia.

ATP CEO Chris Kermode has previously insisted that the World Cup is not a threat to the other team events. At the official launch in November, Kermode told a crowd of reporters ‘There seems to be a fixation that the ATP Cup has caused the issue with the Davis Cup and this is not the case. If the ATP Cup didn’t exist, the Davis Cup still wouldn’t have a week in the calendar.’

Taking those words at face value, there shouldn’t be anything to worry about. Should there?

“I think only time can tell. Maybe both can prevail. I have no idea.” Enqvist admitted.

Wilander is more up front with his views. For him, the decision of hosting the Davis Cup finale in a neutral country might come back to haunt the ITF in the future. Saying that the new format has unnecessarily placed the event in a competition with the ATP Cup.

“The ATP Cup is about the team of a country’s players. The Davis Cup has a brand and it’s not about the team, it’s about the country.” He explained.
“If Davis Cup goes to a neutral ground, then there is a big competition (with the ATP Cup).
“My suggestion would be that the semi-finals and finals have to be played home and away. Whereas the first two rounds can be played during a week on a natural ground.”

The removal of the home and away element to the Davis Cup finals may have a negative effect on the younger audience, instead of their goal of trying to make it appeal more to that target market. A somewhat ironic outcome. Wilander warns that under the new situation, less children might be inspired to participate in tennis.

“Would what be the effect if, lets say, Belgium plays away on a neutral ground? What will be the effect and inspiration for the kids in Belgium. Are they even going to watch it? Because they don’t watch Wimbledon, they don’t watch the US Open, they don’t watch David Goffin lose in the quarter-finals or semi-finals of the French Open. But they will watch Belgium play at home in Belgium, maybe even away in somewhere like France. That will inspire them.”

Woodforde’s call for calm

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Throughout the entire situation, Tennis Australia has been one of the most vocal opponents. Earlier this week, team captain Lleyton Hewitt slammed Kosmos founder Gerard Pique. Telling reporters that it was ‘mind boggling’ that the competition was being run by somebody who had little knowledge about tennis. Hewitt was among a group of individuals from Tennis Australia that signed a letter last year condemning the changes.

Not all people from Australia are against the change. Mark Woodforde argues that action had to be taken before it was too late. The 53-year-old is regarded as one of his country’s greatest ever doubles players, winning 12 grand slam titles in men’s doubles and a further six in the mixed. Alongside Todd Woodbridge, the pair won more doubles matches (14) in the Davis Cup than any other Australian duo.

“I didn’t want to see the Davis Cup competition disappear and that was my biggest fear.” Said Woodforde. “If there wasn’t any changes to make it a significant event again, we wouldn’t have a Davis Cup competition at all.”

Elaborating further, Woodforde argues that there will be a more ‘exciting’ element brought to the Davis Cup. Something others dispute.

“I believe it is the same Davis Cup book, but a different chapter. I think it’s going to be exciting. It’s innovative.” He said.
“I think there has been more negative comments about the format and the competition hasn’t even started. Those pessimist out there, I like to think that a lot of good things are going to be happening top the competition.” He added.

The opinions of Enqvist, Wilander and Woodforde are ones that reflects the current situation in men’s tennis. All are passionate about the sport, but trying to find a common ground seems to be a tough task. If the legends of the sport can’t reach an agreement, what hope does the rest have?

The future of men’s team competition is complexed and unclear. The only certainty is that disagreements and arguments between the key figures in the sport will continue for the foreseeable future. Whether we like it or not.

 

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Interviews

EXCLUSIVE: Thomas Enqvist On The Fight To Revive Swedish Tennis

The world No.4 tells Ubitennis why he is hopeful that Sweden can once again become a powerhouse in the world of tennis.

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This year’s Australian Open marked the 20th anniversary of Thomas Enqvist’s finest moment in a grand slam as a player.

The Swede, who was 25 at the time, entered the 1999 draw at Melbourne Park as an unseeded player. He had never progressed beyond the quarter-finals of a grand slam before, but stunned everyone with consecutive wins over Patrick Rafter and Mark Philippoussis. The run saw him reach the final of the tournament where he had a 6-4 lead against Russia’s Yevgeny Kafelnikov, before losing in four sets. That was to be Enqvist’s first and only taste of what it is like to play in a major final.

“Result wise, this was the best one. It was a good memory.” The 44-year-old said during an interview with Ubitennis. “Of course it is always hard to look back to a final that you lost, but it is still a good memory.”

Enqvist played during a time where Swedish men enjoyed extensive success in tennis. At the time of his run to the Australian Open final, the country had eight players ranked in the top 80. Besides Enqvist, there were Thomas Johansson, Jonas Bjorkman and Magnus Norman all making their inroads on the tour. Sweden were also the reigning Davis Cup champions. Unknown to them at the time, that would be the last time the country would win the team tournament.

It is without a doubt that the country has a rich tennis tradition. In the past Sweden has also produced tennis stars such as Mats Wilander, Stefan Edberg, Jonas Bjorkman and Robin Soderling, who was the last player to win a ATP singles trophy back in 2011. So where did it all go wrong for the Swede’s?

“I think we still have a very strong tennis tradition in Sweden. We have a lot of people involved in Swedish tennis that have good knowledge and their heart in the right place.” Enqvist explained.
“We definitely need a player that can break through and can generate a little bit of hype because it’s all about getting the sports channel in Sweden to show tennis again.”

At present there are just four players from the Nordic country that has an official ATP ranking. Their star players are brothers Elias (22) and Mikael (20) Ymer. Both are yet to break into the world’s top 100. Elias came the closest at 105th last June. Further down the field, there is Markus Eriksson at 523rd and Linus Frost at 658th.

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Due to the lack of top players, trying to maintain mass interest in the sport has become a problem in recent years. As pointed out by Enqvist, who noted the lack of mainstream Swedish media covering the Australian Open this year.

“I think it is a shame that we cannot have more media here (in Melbourne), even if we don’t have any players.” He said.
“If we can’t create enough interest at home how can we get kids interested in tennis? I think everybody has a little bit of responsibility, but it is not an easy situation.” He added.

Despite a seemingly dismal situation, hope lies with the next generation of players. There are currently two Swedish boys ranked in the top 100 on the junior circuit. Meanwhile, others are also gradually coming through.

“We have a bunch of players, who are 15 now. It’s one of the first generations that we have more than one or two.” Enqvist explained.
“This is actually a group of five or six that are international competitors. Hopefully one or two of these perform.”

Whist Enqvist is hopeful, for the foreseeable future, it looks like the lull in Swedish tennis will continue. A somewhat sad situation for a country that once dominated the sport.

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