ITHF Inauguration Class of 2014 with Davenport and Bollettieri - UBITENNIS
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ITHF Inauguration Class of 2014 with Davenport and Bollettieri

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Three-time Grand Slam champion and former World No. 1 Lindsay Davenport will be inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame on July 12 this year. Besides Davenport other notable personalities, who will be also inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame are British tennis writer John Barrett, US-coachin guru Nick Bollettieri and wheelchair champion Chantal Vandierendonck. Davenport currently works as a TV-commentator during the Grand Slam Tournaments and was quoted regarding the honor, “Growing up playing tennis, the Hall of Fame wasn’t even in my dreams. That was thinking a little too big for me to think you’ll get such an honor. It’s a little overwhelming and I can’t even imagine how I’ll be at the ceremony. I never loved the limelight. I’ve been blessed to have been married five years, to have had a family and transitioned to a life after tennis that I’m happy in. I love my job and still get to enjoy the sport. And that’s the beauty of the sport. You can get into it in so many different ways and stay in it all your life if your want to.” 

 
Nick Bollettieri is already a legend in his own right. The coaching guru has owned and operated the Bollettieri Academy in Bradenton, Florida since 1978, has coached several players, both male and female, up to now he claims ten No.1 players in the world – Agassi, Becker, Courier, Hingis, Jankovic, Rios, Seles, Sharapova and Venus and Serena Williams. In 1987, Nick expanded his vision when he joined forces with IMG to turn the Tennis Academy into a multi-sport training facility, now known as IMG Academies. Located on over 400 acres, the IMG Academies complex trains over 13,000 junior, collegiate, adult & professional athletes annually, including families and corporate groups, from over 75 countries annually. Davenport held the world No. 1 title for 98 weeks, winning three Grand Slam titles in the process (1998 US Open, 1999 Wimbledon and 2000 Australian Open) along with a Gold Medal at the 1996 Olympic games. She has also claimed 3 Grand Slam titles in doubles competition. Lindsay Davenport and Nick Bollettieri will be joined by five-time Paralympic medalist Chantal Vandierendonck, executive Jane Brown Grimes, and British tennis broadcaster and author John Barrett in the  Inauguration Class of 2014.
The International Tennis Hall of Fame
It was on the grass courts of the Newport Casino that the first U.S. National Lawn Tennis Championships were held in 1881. That first tournament, won by Bostonian Dick Sears, evolved into one of the four premier tournaments in the world, known today as the US Open. Since then, numerous tournaments have been played on these courts, bringing the great names in tennis to these hallowed grounds. Tennis still lives and breathes in Newport, especially, as each summer the Newport Casino hosts the only remaining grass court professional tournament on the US-continent—one of the many features that distinguish the International Tennis Hall of Fame’s Museum from other sports museums.
The concept of founding a “shrine to the ideals of the game” here at the Newport Casino, originated in 1954 with James Van Alen, a tennis innovator who would later invent the tennis tie-breaker and Van Alen Simplified Scoring System (or VASSS). For almost twenty years, from 1955 through 1974, when it was known as the National Lawn Tennis Hall of Fame, only Americans were considered for Hall of Fame status. However, in recognition of the international nature of the sport, in 1975 eligibility was extended to include candidates worldwide. In 1976, three-time Wimbledon champion Fred Perry of Great Britain was the first international player to be inducted into the newly re-named International Tennis Hall of Fame, which paved the way for official recognition by the International Tennis Federation in 1986.Individuals are elected with a ‘yes’ vote of 75 percent or higher in one of three categories: as a Recent Player, a Master Player or as a Contributor to the sport. ‘Recent Players’ are those who have been active at the highest international level within the last 20 years, and retired for at least 5. A voting panel of tennis media around the world looks at the player’s competitive record, with consideration given to integrity, sportsmanship, and character. A Master Player is evaluated for the same performance criteria, but that player must have been retired from the sport for at least 20 years. The Contributor category recognizes administrators, coaches, officials and members of the media, whose exceptional contributions have furthered the growth, reputation and character of the sport. In both the Master Player and the Contributor categories, voting is done by the International Masters Panel, which consists of existing Hall of Famers and other individuals who have great knowledge of the sport and its history.
The Inauguration CIass 2014 will join the over 200 Hall of Famers from all over the world and live up to the legacy of tennis’s greatest champions which will continue to be recognized and honored each year. (Simone Kemler) 

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REPORT: Japanese Tennis Association To Lose One Billion Yen In 2020

The loss of a key men’s event in the country has resulted in millions of dollars being loss in revenue.

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Venue of the 2019 Mens Japan Open (image via https://twitter.com/rakutenopen)

The cancellation of a premier tennis event in Japan due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is set to have a massive financial impact on the country’s governing body.

 

Last month organisers made the decision to scrap the Rakuten Japan Open Tennis Championships this year amid fears of a second wave of the virus in October when the it is set to take place. The tournament is currently categorised as an ATP 500 event and has been held annually since 1973. In 2019 Novak Djokovic won the tournament for the first time in his career without dropping a single set throughout. Other previous winners also include Roger Federer (2006), Rafael Nadal (2010) and Andy Murray (2011).

“Given concerns about a second wave of the infection both in Japan and overseas, we came to the anguished conclusion that we had to cancel,” organisers said in a statement.

It has been estimated that as a result of the move, the Japanese Tennis Association (JTA) will lose millions of dollars in revenue. National news agency Kyodo has estimated the loss to be at least 1 billion Yen ($9.4 million) based on this event alone and no others.

JTA executive director Naohiro Kawatei told Kyodo that moving athletes in and out of the country is problematic due to the current situation. Tokyo has recently raised it’s Coronavirus alert level to the top of a four-point scale after there have been more than 100 new daily cases of the virus in the city for six days in a row. Furthermore, The Bank of Japan has revised down their growth forecasts.

“In addition to players coming from overseas, it is the responsibility of organizers to facilitate their departure, so there are some differences between our sport and others,” said Kawatei.

At present the women’s top tournament in the country is still on the 2020 schedule. The Pan Pacific Open, which is classed as a Premier event, is currently set to take place during the week commencing November 2nd.

Recently the Asian swing of the tennis season has been thrown into jeopardy after the Chinese General Administration of Sports recommended that no sports events take place in the country unless they are related to Olympic qualification. Although sports federations, including both the ATP and WTA, are seeking clarity from officials before they make their next move. China is usually where the majority of Asian tennis events are played, including the WTA Finals.

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Official: No Swiss Indoors In 2020 Due To COVID-19

Roger Federer’s home event was set to take place between October 26th and November 1st.

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By Emil Evtimov

The ATP 500 Swiss Indoors tournament in Basel won’t happen in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The organizers of the Swiss Indoors already hinted a couple of weeks ago that the tournament in Roger Federer’s hometown was unlikely to happen due to the Coronavirus and the financial impact from the restrictions on spectator capacity.

This year’s edition would have been the 50th anniversary of the tournament, but is now out of the ATP calendar. Organizers are already making plans for the 2021 edition between 23 and 31 October.

“Dear tennis friends, As a result of the Corona pandemic, the world’s third largest indoor tournament has been definitively cancelled,” a statement issued by the tournament reads.
“The ATP has now formally approved the request to cancel the Swiss Indoors Basel, after the tournament management of the Swiss Indoors had already declared in mid-June that it would be irresponsible and unfeasible to hold the tournament in view of the medical, social and economic uncertainty.”

Founded by Roger Brennwald, the Swiss Indoors had been held every year since 1970. It became an event on the Grand Prix Circuit in 1977 and has been classed as a ATP 500 tournament since 2009. 20-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer, who is a former ball boy at the event, has won the title a record 10 times.

The latest development leaves another big question mark on the remainder of the 2020 season. ATP president Andrea Gaudenzi spoke frankly during an interview with Sky Sport Italia and admitted that he is still unsure of what the final quarter of the calendar will look like.

“We have no idea how the Asian swing or the European indoor season could go. It might sound obvious, but I can’t predict how the virus will affect us going forward, there are too many variables to consider,”  he said.

As of today, the ATP Tour should restart on 14 August with the Citi Open in Washington, followed by the Cincinnati Masters and US Open. After that the tour goes to Europe for a mini clay season with the two Masters (Madrid and Rome) and Roland Garros.

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France’s Lucas Pouille To Undergo Surgery

The 26-year-old has suffered another setback to his plans for a return to the Tour.

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Lucas Pouille (photo by chryslène caillaud, copyright @Sport Vision)

Two-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist Lucas Pouille says he is hopeful that he will be able to play tennis again this season after announcing plans to undergo surgery.

 

The world No.58 confirmed on Tuesday morning that he will be having an operation on his right elbow later this month in Paris. Pouille has only managed to play one match this year on the ATP Tour due to the injury, which was at the Indian Wells Challenger tournament where he lost in straight sets to Noah Rubin.  The issue has been bothering the Frenchman since last October when he shut down his season early after the Shanghai Masters.

“It’s never an easy decision to take, but I will get surgery on my right elbow this month in Paris. After new medical exams, it appeared it was the best solution in order to finally be able to play pain-free. I still hope to play before the end of the season.” Pouille said in a statement.

Pouille initially looked to be on track to making a return to action after participating in the Ultimate Tennis Showdown in June. An exhibition tournament created by Serena Williams’ coach Patrick Mouratoglou. However, he lost two matches to Feliciano Lopez and Elliot Benchetrit before being forced to withdraw from the competition due to his elbow.

In recent days the coach of the former world No.10,  Loic Courteau, said they will not be travelling to the US Open next month. Although it is unclear if Courteau’s comments were made before or after the decision to undergo surgery was made.

“I will not be in New York, for the good reason that Lucas… is not going to play the tournament,” he told French television.

Pouille has won five ATP titles so far in his career and has earned more than $7 million in prize money. He is currently the eighth highest ranked French player on the ATP Tour.

Pouille’s ATP titles breakdown

2018 1 Montpellier (Indoor/Hard)
2017 3 Vienna (Indoor/Hard)
Stuttgart (Outdoor/Grass)
Budapest (Outdoor/Clay)
2016 1 Metz (Indoor/Hard)

 

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