"It is finally our year" Argentina fans speak out ahead of Davis Cup Final - UBITENNIS
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“It is finally our year” Argentina fans speak out ahead of Davis Cup Final

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Gabriel and his brother Sebastian posing with Leonardo Mayer, who is a member of the Argentina team for the final (Photo by Andres Lukomski).

As the last major event in Men’s Tennis in 2016 approaches, Ubitennis caught up with two Argentina fans who gave their thoughts on their country’s history in the competition and their chances in the Davis Cup  final against Croatia this weekend.

 

Andres and Gabriel Lukomski are a father and son duo who have lived through the successes, trials and tribulations that the Argentina Davis Cup team has encountered over the last twenty years.

I spoke to Andres first, who recalled the famous final that Argentina played against the United States in 1981. “It was such a hard final, the finest doubles team of all time in McEnroe/Fleming, and our boys Jose Luis Clerc and Guillermo Vilas gave them the match of their lives. That was the match that decided it for me.”

Andres still recalls with pride the tennis on display over the course of that tie. “Clerc defeated Roscoe Tanner, who had a beautiful, powerful serve, and in straight sets too.” Clerc also played the fourth match, losing in another thriller to McEnroe in the match that officially sealed the tie.

We then moved on to discuss the next three final appearances for Argentina, against Russia in 2006, and Spain in 2008 and 2011. “We relied far too heavily on David (Nalbandian)” Andres said. “It was on that carpet in Russia which of course did not favour Juan Ignacio Chela or Jose Acasuso who live on the clay. The Russians with Nikolay Davydenko and Marat Safin had the strength in their number 1 and 2 players that we simply did not have for the surface, though Acasuso still managed to take a set from Safin.”

Gabriel then took me through the 2006 Final defeat to Spain, to date the only Davis Cup final that Argentina have played on home soil, in Mar Del Plata. “We had to try and predict the team” he said. “Given Nadal’s emergence on the clay we decided to forgo the traditional strength of many Argentinians, which is the clay, as we expected him to play.” The final was instead played on hard courts, though the gamble failed to pay off as Nadal did not play with Spain instead fielding Fernando Verdasco and Feliciano Lopez for the singles.

Andres made sure to remind me of one more fact he felt was pertinent to the proceedings. “Poor Delpo (Del Potro) had played in the Masters Cup (now the ATP World Tour Finals) and had to travel all the way from Shanghai (where it was held at the time), to Mar Del Plata. He lost to Feliciano Lopez, a player he would normally beat so I think the travel played a big part.

Gabriel then summed up the final. ” I think of all the appearances in the finals for Argentina so far it was perhaps our biggest chance. If we had stuck to clay we could have beaten Feliciano Lopez for sure and it maybe could have been a different story.

Both father and son talked little of the 2011 defeat, which had seen a Spain team anchored by Nadal win 3-1 in Seville. Andres did mention one thing “Delpo started incredibly in that match with Nadal he won the first set 6-1 you know.

Moving to this year’s clash Andres, who has lived through each agonising defeat so far, was fatalistic about his country’s chances. “I do not think this will be our year” he said. He also noticed a coincidence linking the two finalists. “Croatia is the country of our captain, Daniel Orsanic’s father, it will be a very interesting time for him.”

Gabriel was much more optimistic about the final. “Delpo can definitely beat Cilic and Karlovic. I feel we will lose the doubles as Ante Pavic and Ivan Dodig are regular doubles players. Either Leo Mayer or Federico Delbonis will then beat Karlovic, so we will win 3-2, it is finally our year!” Gabriel also noted a key factor that he felt could tip the balance in the favour of Argentina. “Our fans are undoubtedly the most vociferous, they really create a strong atmosphere for our players even if they are home or away, and Delpo and the team must take heart from that”.

Andres’ final comments regarded Argentina’s path to the final. “We have played all of our ties away from home this year. In Poland, in Italy, We beat Murray and the British in Glasgow, and now we are away again in the final with CroatiaIf we win then we need not ever play again at home” he joked before complimenting his country’s home stadium. “We have a beautiful stadium that was built in Argentina after I left, but I have seen the atmosphere and it is incredible.”

  • My thanks go to Andres and Gabriel for speaking ahead of the Davis Cup final.

 

 

 

 

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Andy Murray won’t travel to Australia

Andy Murray will miss next month’s Australian Open after testing positive for COVID-19 a couple of weeks ago.

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Andy Murray (@the_LTA - Twitter)

Andy Murray has made it official, he won’t be making the trip down under after working with Tennis Australia to find a viable solution to make it work.

 

“We’ve been in constant dialogue with Tennis Australia to try and find a solution which would allow some form of workable quarantine, but we couldn’t make it work.”

Murray was scheduled to fly to Australia with one of charter flights but due to a positive Covid test wasn’t able to make the flight and put his tournament in jeopardy.

Although he missed the chartered flights there was still a small chance he would play but had to workout an agreement with Tennis Australia to make it work. However it didn’t work and was gutted with the news.

“I want to thank everyone there for their efforts, I’m devastated not to be playing out in Australia. It’s a country and tournament that I love.”

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EXCLUSIVE: Inside The Melbourne Bubble – ‘Top Names Get Preferential Treatment But That’s Part Of The Tour’

Marcelo Demoliner celebrated his birthday in quarantine, his doubles partner isn’t allowed to leave his room for 14 days and he believes there is a difference in treatment between the top players and others. Yet, he refuses to complain about the situation he finds himself in.

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Marcelo Demoliner pictured during the 2020 Australian Open. image via https://www.facebook.com/mdemoliner89)

Like his peers, Brazil’s Marcelo Demoliner passes his time in Melbourne quarantine by training, sleeping, eating and posting amusing videos on social media.

 

Demoliner, who currently has a doubles ranking of world No.44, is required by Australian law to abide by a strict isolation period before he is allowed to play any professional tournament. Although he is allowed to train unless he is deemed to be a close contact of somebody who has tested positive for COVID-19. An unfortunate situation 72 players find themselves in, including Demoliner’s doubles partner Santiago Gonzalez

During an email exchange with UbiTennis the Brazilian sheds light on what he labels as an ‘usual experience’ that has prompted criticism from some players. Roberto Bautista Agut was caught on camera describing conditions as a ‘prison’ in a video leaked to the press. Although he has since apologised for his comments. Demonliner himself is not as critical as others.

“It is an unusual experience that we will remember for a long time,” he told UbiTennis. “It is a very complicated situation that we are going through. Obviously, it is not ideal for us athletes to be able to go out for just 5 hours a day, but mainly for the other 72 players who cannot go out, like my partner Santiago Gonzalez. They have a complicated situation of possibly getting injured after not practicing for 14 days, but it is what it is.’
“We need to understand and adapt to this situation considering Australia did a great job containing Covid.”

With three ATP doubles titles to his name, Demoliner is playing at the Australian Open for the sixth year in a row. He has played on the Tour for over a decade and has been ranked as high as 34th in the world.

Besides the players complaining about food, their rooms and even questioning the transparency of the rule making, Tennis Australia also encountered a slight blip regarding the scheduling of practice.

“I was a little lucky because I stayed in one of the hotels that we don’t need to take transportation to go to the training courts. It made the logistics issue much easier. The other two hotels had problems with transportation and logistics in the first two days, but I have nothing to complain about, honestly.”

Demoliner remains thankful for what Tennis Australia has managed to do in order for the Australian Open to be played. Quarantine can have a big impact on a person mentally, as well as physically. Each day players spend at least 19 hours in their hotel rooms which was no fun for the Brazilian who celebrated his 32nd birthday on Tuesday.

“Without a doubt, it is something we have never been through before. I’m luckily having 5 hours of training daily. I am managing to maintain my physical preparation and rhythm. It is not the ideal, of course, but I can’t even imagine the situation of other players who are in the more restricted quarantine.”

image via https://www.instagram.com/MDemoliner/

Priority given to the top names

As Demoliner resides in Melbourne, a selected handful of players are spending their time in Adelaide. Under a deal struck by Tennis Australia, officials have agreed for the top three players on the ATP and WTA Tour’s to be based in the city. The idea being is that it will relieve the strain on Melbourne who is hosting in the region of 1200 arrivals.

Craig Tiley, who is the head of Tennis Australia, has insisted that all players will have to follow the same rules wherever they are based. Although some feel that those in Adelaide have some extra privileges such as a private gym they can use outside of the five-hour training bubble. Japan’s Taro Daniel told the Herald Sun: “People in Adelaide are being able to hit with four people on court, so there’s some resentment towards that as well.” Daniel’s view is one echoed also by Demoliner.

“I do believe they are receiving preferential treatment, quite different from us. But this is part of the tour,” he said.
“The top tennis players always had these extras, we are kinda of used to it. We came here knowing that they would have better conditions for practicing, structure, hotels… they also have merits to have achieved all that they have to be the best players in the world. I don’t know if it’s fair, but I believe the conditions could be more similar than they are in this situation.”

Some players were recently bemused by a photo of Naomi Osaka that surfaced on social media before being removed. The reigning US Open champion was pictured on a court with four members of her team, which is more people than what those in Melbourne are allowed to train with.

https://twitter.com/mdemoliner89/status/1351079924719898632

As the Adelaide contingent continues their preparations, those most unhappy with them are likely to be the 72 players who are in strict quarantine. Demoliner is concerned about the elevated risk of injury that could occur due to the facts they are not allowed to leave their rooms. All players in this situation have been issued with gym equipment to use.

“I think that they will be at a considerable disadvantage compared to who can train. But we need to obey the law of the country, there is not much to do … until the 29th they will have to stay in the room and that is it,” he said.
“Whether it is fair or not, it is not up to me to say because I am not in this situation. The thing about having the other players who didn’t have contact with the positive cases to also stay in the rooms is the concern about the risk of injury, specially for singles players. It will be a tough challenge, especially at the beginning of the season.”

In recent days, officials have been holding video calls with players to discuss ways to address these concerns ahead of the Australian Open. Which will start a week after they are allowed to leave their rooms.

When the tournaments do get underway there are also questions about how the public will react to players who have made headlines across the country for their criticism of the quarantine process. A somewhat sore point for Australian’s with some nationals unable to return home due to the government restrictions. On top of that, people in Melbourne are concerned about a potential outbreak of COVID-19.

It is a very complex situation. I fully understand the reaction of the Australian population considering the recent events… the effect that the players are bringing, the risks to the population,” Demoliner said of the current circumstances.
“We know this and obviously they are concerned with the whole situation, which is still very uncertain. On our side, though, they did allow us to come here to play. It is important to remember that the decision to welcome us was approved by the Australian Government, otherwise we would not be here.”

Demoliner is one of three Brazilian doubles players ranked to have a top 100 ranking on the ATP Tour along with Bruno Soares and Marcelo Melo.

SEE ALSO EXCLUSIVE: Inside The Melbourne Bubble – ‘Players Can’t Act Like Spoilt People’

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Who Are The Best Hard Court Creators In The Last 12 Months?

Here are some of the best players at earning break points on a hard court in the last 12 months.

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Garbine Muguruza (@Tennis - Twitter)

As the Australian Open, slowly, approaches UbiTennis looks at the biggest hard court creators from the last 52 weeks.

 

Although winning matches are determined on how many break point opportunities you convert, to convert the break points you need to create them in the first place.

This can be the biggest challenge but for the players below this isn’t a problem as they are able to consistently create break point opportunities on a hard court.

Starting with the women, it may be a surprise to nobody that Garbine Muguruza, one of the more aggressive returners on the tour leads the way, earning on average 10.4 break points in the last 52 weeks on a hard court.

Muguruza’s hard-hitting style mixed with controlled placement puts her in pole position to punish her opponents on return.

There are also other big hitters in the top 10 such as Petra Kvitova, who averages 9.6 break points while Aryna Sabalenka earns 9.5 break points on a hard court.

While 2020 grand slam champions Iga Swiatek (9.8) and Naomi Osaka (9.3) also feature on this list.

Meanwhile on the men’s side it is Roger Federer who leads this list on average earning 10.8 break points, slightly more than Garbine Muguruza who is on top of the women’s list.

Federer is just ahead of Roberto Bautista Agut with 10.5 break points. This shows just how much Bautista Agut has improved on hard courts in the last 12 months being able to create so many break point opportunities with his return game.

Also featuring on this list are Alexander Zverev (9.2), Novak Djokovic (8.5) and Daniil Medvedev (8.3).

These are the players to look out for when seeing the players who are most likely to create opportunities in their respective draws and who the biggest servers may want to avoid in the Australian Open.

Here are the full lists of the top 10 from each tour and remember the Australian Open is set to begin on the 8th of February.

WTA Top 11 – Most Break Points Earned On A Hard Court In Last 52 Weeks

  1. Garbine Muguruza – 10.4
  2. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova – 10.2
  3. Saisai Zheng – 9.9
  4. Iga Swiatek – 9.8
  5. Anett Kontaveit – 9.6
  6. Petra Kvitova – 9.6
  7. Petra Martic – 9.6
  8. Aryna Sabalenka – 9.5
  9. Ons Jabeur – 9.5
  10. Simona Halep – 9.3
  11. Naomi Osaka – 9.3

ATP Top 12 – Most Break Points Earned On A Hard Court In Last 52 Weeks

  1. Roger Federer – 10.8
  2. Roberto Bautista Agut – 10.5
  3. Alexander Zverev – 9.2
  4. John Millman – 8.9
  5. Dominic Thiem – 8.9
  6. Guido Pella – 8.8
  7. Cristian Garin – 8.5
  8. Novak Djokovic – 8.5
  9. David Goffin – 8.4
  10. Adrian Mannarino – 8.3
  11. Daniil Medvedev – 8.3
  12. Grigor Dimitrov – 8.3

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