Simona Halep takes down Venus in style to earn Serena showdown - UBITENNIS
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Simona Halep takes down Venus in style to earn Serena showdown

World No.1 Simona Halep took down Venus Williams in straight sets to progress to a last-16 encounter with Serena Williams.

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Simona Halep produced a superb performance to beat Venus Williams 6-2 6-3 and set up a mouth-watering clash with Serena Williams in the last 16 at the Australian Open.

 

The Romanian, 27, missed the last month of the 2018 season with a herniated disc in her back, but she seems to be rapidly re-discovering her form once again.

Halep put Venus’ serve under intense pressure immediately and challenged her in every way in the opening set. Initially, the American responded well and saved three break points in her first two service games.

However, the World No.36 eventually succumbed in the fifth game and Halep got the break she wanted.

What happened next was arguably even more crucial, as Venus had four chances to get an immediate break back. But the World No.1 made it difficult for her on every break point, and she was unable to take advantage.

Buoyed by holding serve, Halep immediately broke again and soon clinched the opening set 6-2.

The Romanian enjoyed a lot of success by attacking Venus’ forehand and drawing errors from it in the first set. However, the American tightened up that side in the second set, and it began on a more even keel when the players traded breaks.

The World No.36 also reacted well to hold onto serve after Halep hit three excellent winners to earn two break points in game three.

The score moved on to 3-3 as the next few service games passed without a hitch for either player. The World No.1 held in particularly impressive style as she only dropped one point in two games.

Halep raises her game again to seal victory

Venus’ foothold in the match did not last long, however, as Halep stepped up her returning in game seven and broke with relative ease.

The Romanian finished off the match in impressive style. She hit a brilliant backhand to secure a hold in game eight, and then an excellent forehand to clinch her fifth break and earn a 6-3 scoreline in the set.

“It was a great match,” Halep said in her post-match interview. “I think it was the best match I’ve played so far this year so I’m really happy.”

“It’s always a big challenge to play against Williams sisters so I was super-motivated today. I enjoyed the atmosphere a lot so thank you everyone for coming and being so nice to me.”

When the interviewer mentioned the Romanian’s upcoming encounter with Serena, she laughed nervously and said, “Yeah, not easy – I just have to enjoy it and give my best. I actually have nothing to lose. I will be playing against a great champion so it’s going to be a bigger challenge but I’m ready to face it.”

ATP

Federer And Nadal: Their History In 40 Photos

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Forty matches, forty pictures. The match Federer and Nadal are playing today could be their last one on grass.

 

Let’s see what’s happened before, in pictures.

 

2004

1 – Miami, 3T: Nadal b. Federer 6–3 6–3

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Editorial

2019 French Open: Where The ‘Fedal’ Twain Shall Meet Again

The re-igniting of the Fedal rivalry at the French Open has renewed implications, going beyond the event itself

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Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, French Open 2005
Photo Credit: Live Tennis

For a while now, make that years’ worth, we have been waiting for a Roger Federer-Rafael Nadal clash at the US Open. The draws have been made, either they have been grouped in the same half – and one has fallen short – or they have happened to be in different halves entirely, and have never met.

 

One reason for the higher-than-usual (in the last couple of years) pangs to see Fedal square-off in New York is because of how each of their meetings in the three other Majors has been. We have seen Nadal end Federer’s reign as the favourite at Wimbledon, and the Australian Open. The first result coming about after multiple attempts while achieving the second, in a far easier manner.

But it is what we have had the opportunity to see in Roland Garros that has kept this rivalry distinct and blazing, impervious to time passing by. Twelve of their previous 38 matches have come at the three Majors. Five of these 12 meetings have come by in Paris, four in finals and once in that fated semi-final in 2005, which in the truest of terms was the origin of this rivalrous duopoly. And, it had to happen the way it did for audiences to understand the significance of what this rivalry was and would continue to be.

Though, for a moment, let us imagine an alternate reality. A reality in which the Swiss, instead of the Spaniard, won their first meeting and the ones to follow thereafter. Let us think of an alt-verse where results at the 2008 French Open and Wimbledon did not turn out the way they did. And it was the Mallorcan in place of the Basel-born who needed a coincidental intervention to halt the latter in his tracks in Paris, the following year.

If all of these had transpired, would we have felt the same way about the two being the nemesis of each other? What hold would each player have had in our lives? Would we be thinking of them as a duology, where each player is one half of a pair that has added to men’s tennis’ qualitative appeal?

Indeed, they would have been rivals still but we would not have seen them as equals – as the greatest of the game – despite the clear unevenness in their head-to-head, albeit in Federer’s favour. Most of all, if they had been slated to play in the semi-final of the French Open nearly a decade-and-a-half removed since their first meeting there under such envisioned reality, perhaps, we would not have been this excited about the prospective match-up.

The reality as we know it is so much better. In its moments of exultation and in times of despair – for the players, their fans and even for the supposedly unbiased viewers – reality has presented the players as humans. Each match between Federer and Nadal has seen both players put forth this quality – humanness – at the forefront while vying for wins. Regardless of how easy or hard the results have come by for either player.

When Federer and Nadal step onto the court for their 39th meeting, they will try to do the same all over again, impassive to time’s turning. As Federer said, “Like against any player, there is always a chance. Otherwise, nobody will be in the stadium to watch because everybody already knows the result in advance…For me to get to Rafa is not simple. It took five matches here for me to win to get there. That’s why I’m very happy to play Rafa, because if you want to do or achieve something on the clay, inevitably, at some stage, you will go through Rafa, because he’s that strong and he will be there.

In a way, this match is also about getting closure, specifically in the French capital.

Where Wimbledon and the Australian Open have given us relative cessation, the French Open has remained in limbo in its one-sidedness. This contest, coming at a time when both have different highs at their backs, promises to be an interesting pivot for them to revisit their rivalry and their legacy at the Majors.

Even as it rekindles exigency for more of their matches at the Majors. Not only in Flushing Meadows later in the year, but perhaps in the soon-to-follow Wimbledon championships, too, in a unique kind of second wind.

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Davis Cup

Davis Cup: Team Leaders Deliver in Bratislava, Canada-Slovakia 1-1

Shapovalov and Klizan dispose in straight sets of their n.2 opponents. Day 2 will start at 11 with a delicate doubles rubber

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Denis Shapovalov (left) and Felix Auger Aliassime (right) playing Davis Cup foto: Srdjan Stevanovic/Starsportphoto ©

Under the watchful eye of ITF President David Haggerty, who was present in Bratislava for one of the Qualifying Ties of his new “creature”, Slovakia and Canada have closed the first day with one win each.

 

Despite a 3 pm start time on a working day, the AXA National Tennis Center Arena in Bratislava was almost two-thirds full at the beginning of the day, with a small but colorfully noisy group of Canadian supporters.

It was up to Filip Horansky (n.199 ATP) to represent the home team in the first rubber when he had to face the n.1 Canadian, Denis Shapovalov, n.25 of the world ranking and one of the most interesting teenage prospects of the by-now-infamous “Next Gen”. Horansky put together a solid effort, tried to exploit his bigger habit to play on clay, but eventually he had to succumb to a better player with more powerful weapons. For most of the match the Slovak player was able to sustain the baseline rally with Shapovalov, however he never had any answer to Denis’ accelerations with forehand and backhand, and as the match progressed, he started appearing more and more tired, his energies being burned at a much faster rate than he is normally accustomed to.

Both sets were decided by one break, on the seventh and on the eleventh game respectively, when Shapovalov capitalized his dominance on serve and return and open Canada’s account in this tie.

I believe I played a solid match, especially on serve – said Shapovalov after the match – I feel very confident playing on clay, I have transitioned very well from clay and also this court suits very well my game: balls do not just stop when they touch the ground, it is possible to hit through the court, and this helps me”.

As Shapovalov was talking to the press, his best friend Felix Auger Aliassime was having a dream debut in Davis Cup. With Slovakia 0-1 down, Klizan’s point had become indispensable for the home team, and this pressure was making Klizan play extremely tense and far from his potential. Auger Aliassime got to a 5-2 lead before a calming speech by Slovak captain Dominik Hrbaty was able to relax Slovakia’s n.1 who came back winning five games in a row taking the first set in 50 minutes. The Canadian teenager looked unable to find an answer to the long and slow rallies imposed by Klizan, who would suddenly accelerate into baseline high-speed winners. “I couldn’t have hoped for a better start – said Auger Aliassime – but eventually he raised his level, I started missing shots that shouldn’t be missed, so he eventually imposed his game”. Klizan eventually got to 7-5 5-2 before he could close 7-5, 6-2.

Saturday morning at 11 the Canadian couple will presumably take the stage for the doubles rubber against Filip Polasek and Igor Zelenay.

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