EXCLUSIVE: Journalists Around The World Speak Out On Eve Of Crucial Davis Cup Vote - UBITENNIS
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EXCLUSIVE: Journalists Around The World Speak Out On Eve Of Crucial Davis Cup Vote

Ubitennis has contacted officials around the world to find out what countries will vote in favour of a plan that will revolutionise the men’s team tournament.

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A day before a vote on reforming the Davis Cup takes place, a poll by Ubitennis has found that many federations are still undecided about the plans.

 

Last week a survey was sent to journalists across Europe, South America and North America. In it they were asked about their personal opinion as well as what they think their national federations will vote. Some were unable to answer the latter question as they are also members of their national associations. The three questions asked were :-

  1. Will your tennis Federation vote for the Davis Cup’s revolutionary format proposed by Mr Haggerty?
  2.  What is your personal opinion about it?
  3. Will the proposal be accepted or rejected?

Ubitennis has received responses from officials in nine different countries – Argentina, UK, Croatia, Belgium, Poland, USA, Spain, Switzerland and Canada. Based on their feedback, here is what we have discovered.

Argentina

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The Argentinian position has been explained by journalist Enrique Cano. Cano works for Radio 10 and is a member of the International Tennis Writers Association.

According to Cano’s information, former player Mariano Zabaleta will travel to Orlando to vote. Zabaleta is the vice president of the national federation (AAT). It is understood that the federation has sought input from past and present players, but they are yet to make a final decision. The AAT is now in discussions with other federations before they make a final decision.

“In the case that the ATP decide to go ahead with the new Nations Championship and ITF votes for the new Davis Cup format we will have three similar tournaments in tennis along with the Laver Cup in September. It’s to many for me.” Cano told Ubitennis.
“I think that nobody can guarantee that the changes make the best players join to their National Davis Cup Team.”

Cano predicts the proposal will be rejected.

Great Britain

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The British vote in the Davis Cup is crucial. They are one of only five countries that have the ability to cast a maximum of 12 votes. Stuart Fraser from The Times have reported that the LTA remains undecided. Meanwhile the Stirling University Barmy Army, which is a group of loyal Davis Cup supporters that travel the world supporting the British team, has opposed the reform in a statement on Tuesday.

Richard Evans is a veteran tennis broadcaster with a career that dates back to the 1960s. He was a commentator for the BBC at the Wimbledon championships over a 20-year period. When asked about his opinion on the Davis Cup, Evans has casts his own doubts about the plan.

“I have no idea what the LTA is doing. I hear the French Fed are voting for the Davis Cup changes despite their players being against it. Tennis Australia is voting against.” Said Evans.
“I have advocated changes for years, but not this drastic. The new concept is the World Team Cup, not the Davis Cup.”

As to what the outcome will be on Thursday, Evans believes it will get the go ahead.

“I think it will get passed in Orlando but there will be huge protests. The pendulum always swings too far.” He said.
“But, of course it is all about money and now that has been re-inforced by Larry Ellison’s participation. He loves the idea and will back it. Madrid for the 1st two years (nothing to do with Tiriac) and then Indian Wells for two years. That’s the plan.”

Simon Briggs from The Telegraph has also said that the LTA are still debating the matter. In his personal opinion, the new Davis Cup plan should not be approved due to a lack of information. He believes the proposal will be rejected.

Mike Dickson from The Daily Mail has said that he ‘suspects’ that the LTA will vote against the reform. Although there has been no official confirmation.

“I don’t think the proposal is the worst compromise in terms of structure and keeping some element of home and away is better than nothing. It’s not perfect, but there needed to be change. Probably the best idea now would be to do it every two years and do it properly.” Said Dickson.
“My biggest fear about this plan is the business side of it. What happens if the numbers do not add up for the investors? What are the guarantees? It worries me the future of a great competition being in the hands of a few corporate interests.”

Croatia

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Gordan Gabrovec works for the Croatian News Agency. His country’s position on the Davis Cup is complexed due to recent changes in the organisation. Earlier this year Franjo Lukovic was removed from his position as the president of the Croatian tennis federation. He has been replaced by Nikolina Babic, who is the first female president of the CTF.

“If Mr. Lukovic would still be the president, I have no doubt that CTF would vote for the new Davis Cup format.” Said Gabrovec.
“I would be surprised if that person (from the CTF) would vote against the reform because there is a lot of money promised and for such a small and rather poor federation (in terms of the financial resources) that could be a strong argument. There is another reason to vote for and that is to go along with your best player, as Marin Cilic seems to be a strong suporter of the new format.”

Gabrovec has voiced his personal opposition to the move. Arguing that it will have a negative impact on Croatian tennis fans.

“People in Croatia will not be able to see Croatian players live in action if they don’t travel to foreign countries. I think there are a very small number of people that would go out of the country to watch our team competing in the Davis Cup.” He said.
“There is another issue with one city, one venue format. What if you have, for example, Croatia – Austria DC final in Lille or Madrid? Or anywhere in the world except in Croatia or Austria? How many people would come to watch and what kind of an atmosphere will they create? It would just be another tournament with a great prize money but that Davis Cup feeling would vanish if there isn’t a home team playing.”

Despite his reservations, he believes the proposal will be passed. Citing that the promised injection of money will be enough to sway voters.

“It would be a great surprise for me to see the proposal of the new DC rejected on August 16. Too much money’s been promised and we live in a greedy world that doesn’t care too much for tradition.”

Poland

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Adam Romer from tennisklub.pl believes the ITF will be making a mistake if the plans are passed. Arguing that the situation could be history repeating itself.

“Mr. Haggerty&Co will sell last valuable product owned by ITF and what then? The same mistake was done more than 40 years ago, when ITF lost the control of tournaments and give a space for new organisations ATP and WTA. You feel consequences until today… To make it short: DC need some reforms, but not on this way.” Said Romer.
“I didn’t count the votes, but to rejected you need only 1/3 votes. It’s easier to find it.”

Romer’s opinion about about his federations stance cannot be disclosed due to a potential conflict of interest. A member of his family is part of the Polish ITF delegation.

America

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It has already been reported that America will back the proposal. Two key members of the Kosmos-backed plan, David Haggerty and Larry Ellison, are from the country.

Speaking about his country’s position, Joel Drucker from The Tennis Channel believes change is a good thing.

“I like the idea of trying something new for Davis Cup. From scheduling to exposure to player participation, over the years, this wonderful event has seen certain flaws exposed. So I strongly believe it’s worth giving these new approaches — match length and, most notably, venue — be given a shot.” He said.

Pete Bodo from ESPN has cited two reasons as to why America will vote for the changes. He believes the proposal will be passed.

“The US public (and newspaper editors and other media members) has never fully embraced Davis Cup or they have embraced the idea that Davis Cup needs fixing. The other reason is that the driving force behind the proposal is ITF chief and former USTA president Dave Haggerty.” Bodo explained.
“Personally, I like the Davis Cup format as it is, although I believe it could use some tweaks, perhaps even a change to best of three-set tiebreaker matches. That might help recruit quality players who are sacrificing rest and recuperation time during those awkward DC weeks. I do not think a one-site event played over a week or two is a solution.”

Spain

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It is expected that the Spanish federation will support the proposal. Gerard Pique, who plays for Barcelona F.C, has held numerous meeting with his country’s governing body to persuade them. Also, considering that Madrid is in line to host the new competition, a no vote would be a massive shock.

“There is no official pronunciation of the Spanish tennis federation, but I Know they are in favour of the new format.” Journalist Joan Solsona Magri told Ubitennis.
“At the end for us (Spain) it’s not about what Mr Haggerty proposes. It’s about what Gerard Pique proposes. Pique has had several meetings with the Spanish federation members to convince them.”

Magri, who works for Diario Marca, believes the only issue with the plan is the date of when it will take place.

“For me the only problem are the dates at the end of November. I would suggest to organize the competition at the end of the US Open. Two world cups, I mean ITF and ATP, followed in the calendar, I don’t think they have chances to survive at the same time.” He said.
“I Know the Kosmos team and of course ITF have been working a lot since February when there was the official presentation of the project to the ITF members. I think it will be accepted.”

Switzerland

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Swiss journalist Mathieu Aeschmann is confident that his country will vote for the revamp. Aeschmann writes for publications such as Le Matin and 20 minutes.

“The Swiss Federation will vote for the reform; because the President René Stammbach is the chairman of the ITF finance committee and he welcomes the idea of the financial guarantees that Kosmos would provide.” He said.

Nevertheless, Aeschmann has come out against the plans. Saying that despite his country’s backing, the proposal will be rejected.

“We want to change because the “old generation” want to change. But did we ask the Young Guns? Zverev, Kyrgios, Shapovalov, Coric and Co all played in 2018. So the old format is maybe not as over as it’s sounds.” He argues.
“I could maybe accept a “Final Four” (men and women) after two “normal” rounds and a final in a neutral city… But this Big Tournament (18 Teams?) in November, it’s too much and too late! The players are too tired to play something like this.”

Canada

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Tom Tebbutt works for Tennis Canada. He believes his country will vote for the changes, but due to Tebutt’s job role we can not elaborate any further. Although, this is his own opinion about the matter.

“I think the idea is probably for the best, but a Davis Cup grand final the week after the World Tour Finals is ridiculous – you just can’t expect the top players to be fit enough to play such an important competition at that time.” He said.

Belgium

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The country has been one of the most vocal opponents to the changes and has already confirmed that they will vote against the plans.

Nevertheless, Yves Simon from Sudpresse has reported that he country has already accepted defeat. Interestingly revealing that Belgium will appeal for a wild card in the new style Davis cup, if approved.

“The Belgian position is a resigned position, since our president thinks that everything is already played in favor of kosmos.” Simon explained.
“He will vote … trying to get one of the wildcard 2019 for Belgium.”
“The kosmos plan will pass without problem. Money ruins always the spirit …” He added.

The vote on the Davis Cup reform will take place on Thursday.

Grand Slam

EXCLUSIVE: Inside The Melbourne Bubble – ‘Top Names Get Preferential Treatment But That’s Part Of The Tour’

Marcelo Demoliner celebrated his birthday in quarantine, his doubles partner isn’t allowed to leave his room for 14 days and he believes there is a difference in treatment between the top players and others. Yet, he refuses to complain about the situation he finds himself in.

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Marcelo Demoliner pictured during the 2020 Australian Open. image via https://www.facebook.com/mdemoliner89)

Like his peers, Brazil’s Marcelo Demoliner passes his time in Melbourne quarantine by training, sleeping, eating and posting amusing videos on social media.

 

Demoliner, who currently has a doubles ranking of world No.44, is required by Australian law to abide by a strict isolation period before he is allowed to play any professional tournament. Although he is allowed to train unless he is deemed to be a close contact of somebody who has tested positive for COVID-19. An unfortunate situation 72 players find themselves in, including Demoliner’s doubles partner Santiago Gonzalez

During an email exchange with UbiTennis the Brazilian sheds light on what he labels as an ‘usual experience’ that has prompted criticism from some players. Roberto Bautista Agut was caught on camera describing conditions as a ‘prison’ in a video leaked to the press. Although he has since apologised for his comments. Demonliner himself is not as critical as others.

“It is an unusual experience that we will remember for a long time,” he told UbiTennis. “It is a very complicated situation that we are going through. Obviously, it is not ideal for us athletes to be able to go out for just 5 hours a day, but mainly for the other 72 players who cannot go out, like my partner Santiago Gonzalez. They have a complicated situation of possibly getting injured after not practicing for 14 days, but it is what it is.’
“We need to understand and adapt to this situation considering Australia did a great job containing Covid.”

With three ATP doubles titles to his name, Demoliner is playing at the Australian Open for the sixth year in a row. He has played on the Tour for over a decade and has been ranked as high as 34th in the world.

Besides the players complaining about food, their rooms and even questioning the transparency of the rule making, Tennis Australia also encountered a slight blip regarding the scheduling of practice.

“I was a little lucky because I stayed in one of the hotels that we don’t need to take transportation to go to the training courts. It made the logistics issue much easier. The other two hotels had problems with transportation and logistics in the first two days, but I have nothing to complain about, honestly.”

Demoliner remains thankful for what Tennis Australia has managed to do in order for the Australian Open to be played. Quarantine can have a big impact on a person mentally, as well as physically. Each day players spend at least 19 hours in their hotel rooms which was no fun for the Brazilian who celebrated his 32nd birthday on Tuesday.

“Without a doubt, it is something we have never been through before. I’m luckily having 5 hours of training daily. I am managing to maintain my physical preparation and rhythm. It is not the ideal, of course, but I can’t even imagine the situation of other players who are in the more restricted quarantine.”

image via https://www.instagram.com/MDemoliner/

Priority given to the top names

As Demoliner resides in Melbourne, a selected handful of players are spending their time in Adelaide. Under a deal struck by Tennis Australia, officials have agreed for the top three players on the ATP and WTA Tour’s to be based in the city. The idea being is that it will relieve the strain on Melbourne who is hosting in the region of 1200 arrivals.

Craig Tiley, who is the head of Tennis Australia, has insisted that all players will have to follow the same rules wherever they are based. Although some feel that those in Adelaide have some extra privileges such as a private gym they can use outside of the five-hour training bubble. Japan’s Taro Daniel told the Herald Sun: “People in Adelaide are being able to hit with four people on court, so there’s some resentment towards that as well.” Daniel’s view is one echoed also by Demoliner.

“I do believe they are receiving preferential treatment, quite different from us. But this is part of the tour,” he said.
“The top tennis players always had these extras, we are kinda of used to it. We came here knowing that they would have better conditions for practicing, structure, hotels… they also have merits to have achieved all that they have to be the best players in the world. I don’t know if it’s fair, but I believe the conditions could be more similar than they are in this situation.”

Some players were recently bemused by a photo of Naomi Osaka that surfaced on social media before being removed. The reigning US Open champion was pictured on a court with four members of her team, which is more people than what those in Melbourne are allowed to train with.

https://twitter.com/mdemoliner89/status/1351079924719898632

As the Adelaide contingent continues their preparations, those most unhappy with them are likely to be the 72 players who are in strict quarantine. Demoliner is concerned about the elevated risk of injury that could occur due to the facts they are not allowed to leave their rooms. All players in this situation have been issued with gym equipment to use.

“I think that they will be at a considerable disadvantage compared to who can train. But we need to obey the law of the country, there is not much to do … until the 29th they will have to stay in the room and that is it,” he said.
“Whether it is fair or not, it is not up to me to say because I am not in this situation. The thing about having the other players who didn’t have contact with the positive cases to also stay in the rooms is the concern about the risk of injury, specially for singles players. It will be a tough challenge, especially at the beginning of the season.”

In recent days, officials have been holding video calls with players to discuss ways to address these concerns ahead of the Australian Open. Which will start a week after they are allowed to leave their rooms.

When the tournaments do get underway there are also questions about how the public will react to players who have made headlines across the country for their criticism of the quarantine process. A somewhat sore point for Australian’s with some nationals unable to return home due to the government restrictions. On top of that, people in Melbourne are concerned about a potential outbreak of COVID-19.

It is a very complex situation. I fully understand the reaction of the Australian population considering the recent events… the effect that the players are bringing, the risks to the population,” Demoliner said of the current circumstances.
“We know this and obviously they are concerned with the whole situation, which is still very uncertain. On our side, though, they did allow us to come here to play. It is important to remember that the decision to welcome us was approved by the Australian Government, otherwise we would not be here.”

Demoliner is one of three Brazilian doubles players ranked to have a top 100 ranking on the ATP Tour along with Bruno Soares and Marcelo Melo.

SEE ALSO EXCLUSIVE: Inside The Melbourne Bubble – ‘Players Can’t Act Like Spoilt People’

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Featured

EXCLUSIVE INVESTIGATION: Does Tennis Have A LGBT Inclusivity Problem?

Is it just a coincidence that there are no out players on the men’s Tour or is there a more significant reason that the sport needs to be aware of?

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Tennis has an illustrious reputation when it comes to LGBT representation compared to some other sports.

Billie Jean King, who was first outed by the media in 1981, played an instrumental role in the formation of the WTA Tour and the campaign for equal pay highlighted by her infamous Battle of the Sexes match against Bobby Riggs. It was also during 1981 when Martina Navratilova came out as gay for the first time. Despite being one of the sports biggest stars, the multiple Grand Slam champion admits that she lost endorsement deals due to her sexuality. Nowadays the treatment and promotion of LGBT players have improved for the better, but does more need to be done?

In recent years tennis has dabbled in and out of the Rainbow Laces campaign with the British Lawn Tennis Association throwing their weight behind it. The initiative was created by LGBT charity Stonewall and initially marketed specifically towards football’s Premier League. The idea is to get players to wear rainbow laces in order to raise awareness of LGBT representation within sport. As for its effectiveness in combating homophobia, it is debatable.

“In the UK, sports teams have also been holding Rainbow Laces for the past seven years, yet homophobic language also remains common. Two-thirds of teenage football players and nearly half of male rugby players admit to recently using homophobic language with teammates (for example, fag), which is generally part of their banter and humour. At the amateur level, gay and bisexual males remain invisible,” Erik Denison from Monash’s Behavioural Sciences Research Laboratory wrote in a 2020 report.
“However, recent research suggests that refocusing the current Rainbow Laces campaign, which is underway, away from professional teams and strongly towards amateur sport settings could help fix these problems. We also need to change the education that is being delivered.”

It is important to take Denison’s conclusion with a pinch of salt as his assessment focused solely on team sports and not tennis. Inevitably, some of his findings might be also applicable to tennis, but it is unclear as to what extent.

If the rainbow laces approach does help the LGBT community to some degree and therefore any potential closeted player, should tennis bosses do more to promote it?  UbiTennis has approached three governing bodies to generate their view with all of them saying they would be in favour of allowing players to participate.  

“The work Premier League and Stonewall are doing to drive awareness around LGBT inclusion sets a great example, and we would absolutely support any ATP player that wishes to support such an initiative, or personally express themselves,” an ATP Spokesman told UbiTennis.
“We believe that tennis has an important role to play in promoting inclusivity in sport, and across wider society, and earlier this year Tennis United served as a platform for ATP to amplify voices around this important topic. The ATP has directed efforts for positive change across many causes via the ATP Aces For Charity programme, and we are currently reviewing our overall approach in this space.”


Unlike their female counterparts, there is currently no openly LGBT player on the ATP Tour and few historically. Bill Tilden, who won 10 Grand Slam titles throughout the 1920s, struggled with his sexuality during a time where gay sex was illegal and not accepted by society. More recently, America’s Brian Vahaly was a former top 100 player during the early 2000s, but chose to come out after retiring from the sport.

The WTA points out that they have been working with the ATP last season and addressed LGBT topics during their ‘Tennis United’ chat shows which was broadcast online.

“The WTA was founded on the principles of equality and opportunity, along with positivity and progress, and wholeheartedly supports and encourages players, staff, partners and fans’ commitment to LGBT+ initiatives,” a statement reads.
“The WTA supports tournament and Grand Slam LGBT+ projects both logistically and financially, amplifies our athletes’ voices on this topic through the Tour’s global platforms, and increased awareness by incorporating the LGBT+ spirit  into our corporate identity in June across our digital platforms.
“Despite the challenges 2020 has presented, this year saw the WTA mark Pride month with a series of podcasts and web articles, interview guests on the WTA & ATP digital show Tennis United from the LGBT+ community, and through WTA Charities collaboration with You Can Play, offer equipment and financial donations and players participate in a virtual panel discussion.”


The International Tennis Federation is responsible for overseeing the running of the junior Tour, Davis Cup, Billie Jean King Cup (previously known as Fed Cup) and the Olympic Tennis tournament. A spokesperson said they would endorse any campaign which would support an equal playing field in the sport. Making reference to their Advantage All campaign which aims to ‘develop and maintain tennis as an equal advantage sport.’

“Tennis has a proud history of its athletes being at the forefront as advocates of positive social change, using their voice and platforms to raise awareness. We would be supportive of initiatives that reinforce the positive message that tennis is an equal advantage sport which is open to all,” UbiTennis was told.

 
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Editorial

EXCLUSIVE: How To Survive A Pandemic If You Work In Professional Tennis

Amid the heavy financial implications caused by COVID-19, UbiTennis looks at how two leading sports businesses have managed to survive over the past year.

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World No.1 Novak Djokovic being interviewed by reporters (image via theemiliagroup.com)

At the start of 2020 it was business as usual for Sports communications agency The Emilia Group and their partnership with tennis. January saw them collaborate with one of the sports biggest events, the Australian Open, followed by the Thailand Open a month later. It was all going to plan until the COVID-19 pandemic not only slowed down their business but forced them to find a new direction.

 

Tennis has been one of the heaviest affected sports due to the virus with all professional tournaments being cancelled for months during 2020. Victims included Wimbledon, which hasn’t been cancelled since the Second World War. Across the globe, players were left without any earning opportunities and businesses working in the sport faced a bleak outlook.

“We lost eleven events, most of which were cancelled or postponed in the space of a few weeks in March and April, including major events like the Olympic Games and Wimbledon,” Emilia Group director Eleanor Preston said during an interview.
“We’re a small business and in a matter of a month or so we went from being on course to having one of our most successful years since we started the company ten years ago to having our most challenging year by far.”

Over the past decade, Preston and co-director Faye Andrews have managed to establish The Emilia Group as one of the prominent businesses within the sports directory, the International Tennis Federation, two Grand Slam tournaments and an array of events in Asia have been just some of their clients in recent time. Still, their resume was not enough to shield them from COVID-19 with the company losing an estimated £110,000 in potential or confirmed business last year due to the pandemic.

On the other hand, other companies have had a different experience. LiveWire Sport is a BAFTA-winning content agency who have constructed some of Wimbledon’s most popular videos such as the ‘we cheer for them’ video which was narrated by Roger Federer.

“Working in the digital space meant that actually our ability to do our work was not affected hugely, and demand for the kind of services we offer was still high – albeit many of our clients had to balance up the decrease in revenue from live events with the desire to find a way to still engage with sports fans on a global scale and of course to deliver value for their commercial partners, often via social and digital,” Livewire Director and Co-Founder, Caroline Cheese, said.
“We worked with our existing clients to build campaigns to maintain fan engagement, whether that be via esports and gaming, or maximising archive.”

A change in tactics

Like other industries, diversification was the key for survival. Joining most of the population, The Emilia Group got on board with the use of online video chat platforms by launching their own ‘media lounge’ via Zoom. Their goal was to keep the tennis community together while there was no sport happening. Not only was the idea a success with the Tiebreak Tens group backing them, it is now something they intend to do for the foreseeable future.

“They proved to be really popular because people were really missing the informal interaction that you get at events – the chats in the coffee or the sandwich queue, the laughs and the gossip. We wanted to recreate some of that, albeit virtually,” Preston explains.
“It’s something that we plan to keep doing because we could see journalists having to cover events remotely for a while to come.
“I was a tennis journalist on the Tour before doing this job so I’ve spent a lot of the last twenty years travelling and packing or unpacking a suitcase. Tennis is a travelling circus and I love it but it’s also been nice to slow down and step away from it for a while and remember that tennis isn’t everything.”

https://twitter.com/TheEmiliaGroup/status/1304330706223591425

For LiveWire the timing of the pandemic was ironically advantageous for the launch of a brand new app they have been developing. Its aim is to try and generate content from athletes quicker than before which plays into the hands of the COVID-19 restrictions with those taking part being encouraged to do so from home.

“The  LiveWire Studio app is designed to get high quality video from athletes, ambassadors and fans to video editors as quickly as possible. Its launch proved timely, with many sports organisations looking for a way to film content remotely and to harness the power of user-generated content,” Cheese explained about the project. 

Adapting was another key element for their survival with The Emilia Group receiving a reprieve from the Lawn Tennis Association. With professional events halted last summer, the LTA launched their own series of events for British players.

Their task was to help with the promotion of The Progress Tour which featured a female-only line-up.

“Faye was on-site for that and the tournament itself was very successful. Those early events were so important for showing how tennis could adapt to the pandemic and still host competitions in a safe way,” Preston points out.

The Future

Undoubtedly there is light at the end of the tunnel after what has been a turbulent year. Although the clouds of uncertainty are not going away just yet, Tennis’ return date in 2021 was thrown into chaos due to a plan allowing players to enter Australia in December being ruled against by the government. They will now be arriving from January 14th onwards. Besides questions being raised over the Australian Open, there are also fears even more of the smaller events could be chopped as a consequence in the coming months.

Preston is refusing to reach the point of despair as she aims to recover some of the revenue her company lost, like many around the world she hopes the rapid development of COVID-19 vaccines will help aid the recovery more rapidly when it officially comes into effect.

“There’s reason to be optimistic beyond that because even if the vaccines are rolled out more slowly than we are all hoping, the industry and the Tours have done a great job of adapting and showing that tennis can carry on in a safe and manageable way,” she said.
“I think we’ve all learned that there are different ways of doing things and that can be a good thing because it’s our job to make sure that we keep improving the service we deliver.”

Cheese is also optimistic but admits to having concerns about the long-term impact the pandemic could have on the foundations of sports such as tennis.   

“The fact that we have weathered the storm so far means I think we remain confident about the future. My main concern is for the smaller sports, events, leagues and clubs, as well as for the long-term impact of the pause in grassroots sport,” she said. 

The financial impact of COVID-19 on tennis has been widespread. In Britain, the LTA has seen an estimated 40% fall in income which is roughly £30 million. Meanwhile, across the Atlantic this year’s US Open took place despite a 80% drop in revenue compared to 12 months prior. 

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