The ATP First Quarter Report Card - UBITENNIS
Connect with us

Comments

The ATP First Quarter Report Card

Ubitennis reviews the first three months of action on the ATP Tour this year.

Avatar

Published

on

Roger Federer (zimbio.com)

Examining the performances of the most notable players from the first three months of the season, as well as their prospects heading into Q2.

 

Roger Federer
Embed from Getty Images

It was an historic Q1 for Roger Federer. After winning his unprecedented 20th major title at the Australian Open, he decided to play in Rotterdam and regained the number one ranking from Rafael Nadal. Federer had not been number one since 2012, setting a record for the most days elapsed between weeks at number one. He is also the oldest man to ever be number one in the world. Roger went 17-0 to start 2018, the longest winning streak to start a year out of any year in his career. However, Federer ended the quarter on a two-match losing streak, the first time he lost back-to-back matches since 2014. After losing in a final set tiebreak in an excellent Indian Wells final against Juan Martin Del Potro, he was defeated by Thanasi Kokkinakis in his Miami opening round in another final set tiebreak. We won’t be seeing much of Roger in Q2, as he again will be skipping the entire clay court season. A lot can change in three months in the tennis world, but there’s no evidence to suggest he won’t be a top contender to win his 10th title in Halle & his ninth title at Wimbledon.

Juan Martin Del Potro

Embed from Getty Images
Federer may have dominated the first half of Q1, but Del Potro was the best player in the world for the second half. The Argentine started the year by advancing to the final in Auckland, where he lost in a tight final to Roberto Bautista Agut. He then suffered earlier losses in Melbourne and Del Ray Beach. But it was in Acapulco where Del Potro began a 15-match winning streak. That week in Mexico, he bested three top 10 seeds to take the title. Then in Indian Wells, there was the thrilling victory against Federer. He was clearly spent in Miami, yet still managed to make the semifinals. Following so many years of suffering from wrist troubles, Juan Martin is finally playing his best tennis again. He is now hitting over his backhand rather than hitting almost all backhand slices. After some much-needed rest, a healthy Del Potro will be a threat in any tournament on any surface. From now through August, he does not have a lot of points to defend. He should easily ascend to his career-high ranking of number three, and possibly beyond. With such a high seeding at the majors, he should avoid prolonged early-round battles and be fresher at the end of the fortnights.

Marin Cilic

Embed from Getty Images
Cilic has now made two of the last three major finals, accounting himself much better in the more recent one as he pushed Federer to five sets in Melbourne. Marin went just 4-3 over the next two months, and the clay season is not Marin’s strong suit. The French Open is the only major where Cilic has not been passed the quarterfinals, though he did advance to that round for the first time just last year. Q3 is likely the next possible peak time for Cilic, but I’m interested to see how Marin deals with the demons that await him at Wimbledon. In both of the past two years, Cilic suffered devastating defeats at the hands of Roger Federer.

Hyeon Chung

Embed from Getty Images
The winner of the inaugural ATP Next Gen Finals in November has used the momentum from that victory to catapult his career to a new level in 2018. After his big breakthrough at the Australian Open, where he upset both Alexander Zverev and Novak Djokovic in making it all the way to the semifinals, he’s continued to consistently perform well. Chung has advanced to the quarterfinals at every subsequent tournament. He’s currently fourth in the ATP Race to London. Looking to Q2, Chung has shown he can also play on the clay. Including qualifying rounds, Hyeon had 13 wins during the 2017 European clay court season. I look for Chung to continue to ascend the rankings in Q2.

Kevin Anderson

Embed from Getty Images
Speaking of consistent performers on tour, The South African has rather quietly become one, and currently sits at number five in the Race to London. Aside from his five-set opening round loss to eventual semifinalist Kyle Edmund at the Australian Open, Anderson made the quarterfinals or better at every Q1 tournament he entered. This included winning the title at the inaugural New York Open, where he pulled out three matches in final set tiebreaks. However, he still has a few troubling patterns in his career to overcome. Most notably, he is now 0-10 in Masters 1,000 quarterfinals, which includes losses at that stage in both Indian Wells and Miami. He’s also just 2-9 in Grand Slam fourth rounds, with the US Open being the only major he’s been passed the fourth round. The clay and the grass are not his forte, as Kevin has zero combined titles on those two surfaces. But Anderson will have a higher seeding in tournaments now that he is ranked inside the top eight, so the coming months are a good opportunity to change those patterns.

John Isner

Embed from Getty Images
Isner’s loss in the Bercy semifinals to qualifier Filip Krajinovic back in November must have been extremely disappointing, especially considering a tournament win would have qualified him for his ATP Finals debut. That negative momentum carried over to 2018, as he started the year just 2-6. But everything changed for Isner in Miami, where he beat many in-form players, including three top five seeds, to win the biggest title of his career. And you may be surprised to read that Roland Garros is Isner’s second-best major in terms of winning percentage. He’s twice been as far as the fourth round in Paris, and once pushed Nadal to five sets. He’s also defeated Roger Federer on clay, and advanced to the semis last year at the Rome Masters. The point here is Isner can play on the clay, so I look for John to carry his newfound confidence into strong Q2 results.

Rafael Nadal

Embed from Getty Images
Unfortunately it was a rather quiet Q1 for Rafael Nadal due to hip and leg injuries. The Australian Open was the only tournament he played, and he was forced to retire during the fifth set of his quarterfinal match with Marin Cilic. Nadal is set to return to the court later this week at the Davis Cup tie against Germany. With Federer’s opening round loss in Miami, Nadal narrowly recaptured the number one ranking despite being sidelined. But Rafa has 4,680 points to defend on the clay, including titles at Monte Carlo, Barcelona, Madrid, and Roland Garros. Coming off a two-month injury layoff, it’s hard to imagine Nadal can be as dominant on the clay this season. He will most likely drop the number one ranking back to Federer in the coming weeks. The bigger question is this: will Nadal be healthy enough to win an astounding 11th French Open title? Rafa has either withdrawn or retired from every tournament he’s entered over the past five months. While I’m sure he gave his body rest in hopes of peaking on the clay, it’s hard to see Nadal reaching the peak level needed to win seven best-of-five matches in Paris.

Novak Djokovic

Embed from Getty Images

What a bizarre few months it’s been for Novak Djokovic. In his first tournament in six months, he was upset by Hyeon Chung in the fourth round of the Australian Open. He then had a small surgical procedure done on his elbow. Novak returned to the court in Indian Wells, where he looked lackluster, and at times unmotivated, during his opening round loss to Taro Daniel. He arrived in Miami stating he was pain-free for the first time in a long time, but proceeded to lose in his opening round to Benoit Paire. And with the sudden announcement that Andre Agassi has left Djokovic’s camp, with Agassi citing they disagreed “far too often,” Novak’s immediate future is all the more murky. I still believe Djokovic will eventually return to the top of the sport, but it seems it’s going to take much longer than initially anticipated. With Federer on the sidelines, and many of his contemporaries also far from 100%, I’m curious to see if Novak can regain some of his mojo on the clay.

Comments

Alex Olmedo Was More Than Charming…

Alejandro “Alex” Olmedo Rodríguez, the man who came from so little and made so much from being able to play extraordinary tennis, has left many with cherished memories, as Mark Winters’ story brings out…

Avatar

Published

on

Alex Olmedo - Photo USC Athletics

He was born in Arequipa, the second largest city in Peru. It is 678 kilometers from the country’s largest city and its capital, Lima. His hometown is known for its spicy cuisine and the volcanic white stone that is used in the construction of the eye-catching buildings and houses that line the streets. He was the son of the man who took care of the clay tennis courts at the Club Internacional Arequipa. He taught himself to play and spent time working as a ball boy at the club. As a teenager, he made his way to the US and went on to become one of the game’s greats.

 

Though the story of Alejandro “Alex” Olmedo Rodríguez, who passed away on December 9th due to brain cancer at the age of 84 at his home in Encino, California, reads like a fairytale, it is actually a good deal more dramatic than “Once upon a time”…

He first came to the country that would eventually become his home in 1951 to  play in the US National Championship at Forest Hills, New York. In a prelude to threads that would be woven throughout his life, Olmedo lost 6-0, 6-4, 6-1 to Jacque Grigry, who was from Alhambra, California and was a three-time All-American at USC.  Being the best player in Peru, at the beginning of 1954, the seventeen-year-old became an adventurer. In effect he played a role in the yet-to-be-made John Hughes movie “Planes, Trains and Automobiles”. Thanks to money raised in Arequipa, Olmedo, who didn’t speak English at the time, journeyed from Peru to Havana by ship, then to Miami by plane, and came to California on a bus. 

Description: A picture containing text, person, person, old

Description automatically generated
Alex Olmedo Photo Modesto Junior College

He ended up at Modesto Junior College, in the town of the same name, in Central California. He took English and other classes and played on the school’s tennis team which was one of the best in the state at the time. The 1954 squad included Olmedo, who lost to Pancho Contreras in the State Junior College Singles final, and Joaquin Reyes, who lost to Contreras in the state singles title round the year before. The trio, who were members of the third Modesto Junior College Hall of Fame induction class, moved on to USC. (In the mid-1950s, Modesto’s tennis program was a conduit to USC tennis and their acclaimed coach, George Toley. Players would  finish their two-years at Modesto, then move south to become Trojan competitors.)  

Their “good” on the JC level became even better in NCAA competition. Contreras and Reyes won the NCAA Doubles in 1955. The next year, Olmedo doubled, taking the singles title and then the doubles with Contreras. In 1958, he doubled again earning the singles champion and teamed with Ed Atkinson for the doubles trophy. 

At five feet, ten inches tall, Olmedo wasn’t physically imposing. But, he had a formidable serve produced from a free-flowing motion that featured ballerina-like tip-toe balance as he tossed the ball up. That was merely a prelude to an exacting forehand and deft volleying. He was extremely quick and athletic. He had flair, along with a feel that combined to make him a solid competitor. Yet, the thing that made him a standout was his approach. In a 1959 story in Sports Illustrated, he revealed that from playing, not the advice of coaches, he learned how to play…

Perry T. Jones, the fabled leader of tennis in Southern California from 1930 until his death in 1970, was unrivaled when it came to controlling the game locally, nationally and for that matter, internationally. Aware that Olmedo had lived in the country for more than three years, along with the fact that Peru did not have a Davis Cup team, at the time, Jones recruited the twenty-two year-old  to play for the US. And it just so happened that Jones was the US Davis Cup captain in 1958 and would be again in ’59.

Olmedo, who had made an impression in NCAA play, added to his accomplishments playing Davis Cup for Jones, as a non-US citizen, in the US’s 3-2 victory over Australia.  The 1958 Challenge Round was played on the luxurious grass at the Milton Courts in Brisbane, December 29th through the 31st. The “Chief”, as he had been nicknamed because of his cultural background, was responsible for each one of the winner’s points. He defeated Mal Anderson and Ashley Cooper both in four sets and teamed with Ham Richardson to outlast Anderson and Neale Fraser in an epic five set doubles contest. (Barry MacKay, who lost both his singles matches, was the other US team member; and Jones was the non-playing captain.)

In the semifinals, the US defeated Italy 5-0 on the grass at Royal King’s Park Tennis Club, in Perth, December 19th through the 21st.  In the last match of the tie, Olmedo downed Orlando Sirola, the six foot-seven inch competitor who began playing the game at the age of 22 (in 1950), 20-18, 6-1, 6-4. The thirty-eight games played in the first set established the record for most games in a singles set. (As the holder of the title, Australia was not required to compete in the preliminary rounds of the Davis Cup.)

Olmedo’s trophy collecting continued at even more brisk pace in 1959. At the Australian National Championship at Memorial Drive in Adelaide, January 16th through the 26th, he defeated Fraser, 6-1, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 in the final. On the lawns at the All England Lawn Tennis Club in London, Olmedo methodically vanquished Rod Laver, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4 in the Wimbledon title round. It was strangely fitting that the match was played on Saturday, July 4th, a holiday celebrated in his adopted country. Looking to join – Jack Crawford of Australia (1933); Fred Perry of Great Britain (1934); Tony Trabert of the US (1955); Lew Hoad of Australia (1956) – as one of the few players to win three of the four majors in a signal season, Fraser gained revenge for his loss in Australia, confounding Olmedo in the US National Championship Singles final, 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4.

(The incomparable, J. Donald Budge set the standard winning all four of the  Grand Slam singles titles in 1938.) 

Description: A picture containing text, person, group, posing

Description automatically generatedFormer stars of the men’s Los Angeles tournament – Ted Schroeder, Alex Olmedo, Ellsworth Vines, Fred Perry, Arthur Ashe and Jack Kramer Photo Mark Winters

Jack Kramer, Joseph Bixler, men’s Los Angeles Tournament Honoree Richard “Pancho” Gonzalez, Honorable Robert Kelleher, Alex Olmedo, Pancho Segura and Bobby Riggs. Cynthia Lum Photo

In 1960, Olmedo joined the professional ranks. He enjoyed moderate success on the Jack Kramer Tour winning the 1960 US Pro title, reaching the semifinals at the Wembley Pro events in 1960 and ’63, as well as being a quarterfinalist at the French Pro tournaments in 1962 and ’64. His competitive pro career came to an end in 1965 when he retired.

Description: A picture containing person, outdoor, posing, standing

Description automatically generated
Alex Olmedo at the Beverly Hills Hotel in 1969 with Edda Speisser, a childhood friend from Peru who used to date his younger brother, Jaime.

Shortly after his playing career came to an end, he began another as a teaching professional. Being personable and never too busy to chat made him an institution at the Beverly Hill Hotel. As the Director of Tennis at the legendary spa, he held court for close to forty years.  During that time, he taught (and cajoled in a friendly manner) the likes of Katharine Hepburn and the irrepressible Charlton Heston, who played the game as if he were still Ben-Hur (the role that took him to movie stardom in 1959).

Description: A picture containing person, clothing, person, necktie

Description automatically generated
2011 Southern California Tennis Association Hall of Fame inductee, Kathy May with 2000 SCTA Hall of Famer, Alex Olmedo Photo Cheryl Jones

During the early 1970s before he became US Davis Cup captain, International Tennis Hall of Famer, Tony Trabert worked with Kathy May regularly at her father’s house in Beverly Hills. It was a mere three blocks from Olmedo’s teaching court at the Beverly Hills Hotel. I was fortunate to be able to take part in Trabert’s workouts with May, who is Taylor Fritz’s mother. On a number of occasions, prior to the afternoon’s at David May’s or after they had taken place,  I would drop-in on Olmedo. He treated me like a long-lost friend, often telling me “we had to find time to have a hit …”, or inviting me to come back and have lunch with him. Even more meaningful, whenever I needed quotes for a story I was putting together, he found a way to always be available for a chat. He would not only answer my questions, he would regularly add insights that varied from meaningful, to amusing, to scandalous. He had a magic personality.

Olmedo’s on court success was recognized in 1983 when he became an inaugural member of the Intercollegiate Tennis Association Men’s Hall of Fame. The USC Athletics Hall of Fame enshrined him in 1997. He was inducted into the Southern California Tennis Association Hall of Fame in 2000. The ultimate accolade came in 1987 when Olmedo became a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame. (And as mentioned above, he was in Modesto Junior College third Hall of Fame class.)

“The Chief” passed away at his Encino, California home. He is survived by Alejandro Jr., his son, along with Amy and Angela, his daughters, as well as four grandchildren.

The man who came from so little and made so much from being able to play extraordinarily well will be remember for much more. The foremost was for giving so many the opportunity to develop a friendship with Alejandro “Alex” Olmedo Rodríguez.

Continue Reading

Comments

It Isn’t Just Football Who Are Mourning The Loss Of Diego Maradona

The world of football has lost one of its icons and tennis has lost a loyal fan.

Avatar

Published

on

Diego Maradona (image via Sky Sports Tennis Twitter)

It was during the 2013 Dubai Tennis Championships when Diego Armando Maradona stated that tennis was his second favourite sport after his beloved football.

 

The Argentinian sporting icon was a passionate and enthusiastic follower for more than 30 years until his death on Wednesday due to a heart attack. Regularly he would be seen watching matches in crowds at various tournaments. One of the earliest anecdotes took place in 1984 when he turned up to watch the French Open final and cheered on John McEnroe, who was taking on Ivan Lendl. Swiss journalist Rene Stauffer was sitting next to him and remembers the iconic figure ‘cheering like crazy.

Of course it was his fellow countrymen and women who Maradona was most interested in supporting. One in particular was Juan Martin del Potro who won the 2009 US Open. He once joked ‘Next week I’ll be the one training del Potro myself. I will ask Franco Davin to step aside and Diego will train del Potro.‘ He appeared to have a great amount of respect for the former world No.3 who is one of thousands mourning his death.

I feel that you return to the place that belongs to you, HEAVEN. For me you will never die. Rest in peace,” Del Potro wrote on Twitter.

After retiring from professional football in 1997 Maradona encountered his own personal demons as he battled with health issues and drug addiction. Nevertheless, his passion for sport never suffered. Attending various Davis Cup ties, he was usually seen shouting and cheering for his countrymen. He even had his own VIP box sporting his country’s flag with the words ‘The Maradona family is here‘ during the 2017 final between Argentina and Croatia.

https://twitter.com/DavisCup/status/1331644021622575108

Despite his calibre, Maradona said that he was star struck to meet some of tennis’ top names. One of those was former world No.1 Caroline Wozniacki who got talking to him during the Dubai Tennis Championships seven years ago. At the time Maradona was an ambassador for the Dubai Sports Council (DSC).

“I had the pleasure to meet Caroline Wozniacki. She is one of the top players and she is very beautiful and a very nice girl,” he said. “Despite her ranking and all her achievements, she came to say hello to me, although I’m the one who wanted to get up and go and greet her.”

As for the three giants of men’s tennis, Maradona cheered them on and spoke to them on numerous occasions. Wheather that was in person or via video message.

For Rafael Nadal this year marks the 10th anniversary of when the two spoke with each other at the ATP World Tour Finals in London. When the news broke of Maradona’s death he was one of the first to pay tribute.

“One of the greatest sportsmen in history, Diego Maradona, has left us. What he did in football will remain. My deepest and most heartfelt condolences to his family, the world of football, and to all of Argentina.” He wrote on social media.

It was in the same tournament as Nadal when Novak Djokovic once said ‘to have him as a supporter is an incredible honour and a pleasure.‘ A few months on from that, the two briefly spent time together in Abu Dubai as the Serbian conducted his off-season training.

One of Maradona’s final interactions with tennis before his death took place last year when Roger Federer played an exhibition match in Buenos Aires. In a video message broadcasted on the screens of the stadium he said to the Swiss ‘you were, you are and will be the greatest. There’s no other like you.‘ Words that brought tears to the eye of the 20-time Grand Slam champion. Originally the two had planned to meet in person but were unable to due to Maradona’s health.

https://twitter.com/canal_tenis/status/1197369560430710784

It was just three weeks ago when world No.9 Diego Schwartzman spoke out about the influence the footballing great has had on his country. The two never met in person but like many others, he was an idol for the tennis star.

“He’s been a sports idol since I was a kid. I’ve seen it on YouTube, not only, I’ve seen it on TV too. I’ve never seen him for real. He’s one of my soccer idols and I love soccer.” Schwartzman said.
“Wherever we go, everyone knows Argentina thanks to Maradona! This is the reason why I have the first name, Diego.”

Argentina has declared three days of national mourning following Maradona’s death.

Continue Reading

ATP

The ATP Finals Exceeded Expectations But There Was No Changing Of The Guard

Daniil Medvedev has shown how a player outside of the Big Three can shine at one of the most significant tournaments in men’s tennis but it is wrong to read too much into this achievement.

Avatar

Published

on

Daniil Medvedev with the Nitto ATP Finals trophy (image via https://twitter.com/DaniilMedwed)

On Sunday afternoon the 2020 tennis season ended with a pulsating showdown between two of the biggest names outside of the formidable Big Three.

 

Daniil Medvedev held his nerve to fight back and edge out Dominic Thiem in an enthralling roller-coaster encounter that lasted almost three hours. Besides claiming the biggest title of his career to date, the Russian has become only the fourth player in history to defeat the world’s top three players at the same tournament, following in the footsteps of Boris Becker, Novak Djokovic and David Nalbandian.

In the aftermath of Medvedev’s victory came the inevitable question – is this the start of a new era in men’s tennis? For over the last decade the Tour has been dominated by Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. Between them they have won 57 Grand Slam titles and shared the No.1 position continuously since August 2017. In fact, since February 2nd 2004, Andy Murray is the only other player outside of the trio to have held the top position.

“Hopefully all of us young guys will keep pushing and will have some great rivalries,” Medvedev told reporters on Sunday.
“Hopefully we can be there for a long time, maybe pushing the other generations back because that’s how we can be close to the Top 3.”

Medvedev’s emphatic performance at the end-of-season event showed that he has what it takes to scale the top of the game but recent history suggests that too much shouldn’t be read into it. Remarkably no member of the Big Three has won the event since Djokovic in 2015. Instead there have been five different champions most recently with each of those years raising hopes that there could be a changing of the guard on the Tour.

However, those hopes have never fully materialised. Prior to Medvedev, the four most recent ATP Finals champions have failed to win multiple titles the following year. In the case of 2017 winner Grigor Dimitrov, he hasn’t won a trophy of any sort since.

ATP Finals championTitles won over the next 12 monthsBest Grand Slam run over next 12 monthsYear-end ranking 12 months later
Andy Murray (2016)1French Open SF16 (down 15)
Grigor Dimitrov (2017)0Australian Open QF19 (down 16)
Alexander Zverev (2018)1French Open QF 7 (down 4)
Stefanos Tsitsipas (2019)1French Open SF 6 (no change)


It can be argued that the numbers above fail to tell the full story. For example Andy Murray’s injury woes started to hinder him the year after he won the tournament and Tsitsipas’ season has been marred by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it does illustrate that staying at the very top of the game on a consistent basis without beng a member of the Big Three is a tough ask, raising questions about if the landscape of men’s tennis will ever change before Djokovic and co retire?

“There is going to be a time when they are not around anymore, then it’s going to be so important to keep all the tennis fans and to keep them with this great sport,” world No.3 Thiem explains.
“I think that’s our challenge, that we perform well and play great in big tournaments to become huge stars ourselves.
“It’s super important for tennis in general because they (the Big Three) gave so much to the sport. That’s our challenge to keep all those people with tennis and to maybe continue their story.”

Thiem boasts the honour of having at least five wins over every member of the trio, something  that has only ever been achieved by Murray. In London he defeated both Nadal and Djokovic which was something Medvedev also managed to achieve during the same week.

Veteran journalist Steve Flink perhaps is one of the most knowledgeable figures when it comes to the evolution of men’s tennis in the Open Era. His work in the sport dates back to 1972 when he was a statistician covering the US Open for CBS and working alongside the iconic Bud Collins. In a video chat with UbiTennis, Flink notes the recent shortcomings by ATP Finals champions but is hopeful that 2021 could be different.

“I don’t think we should put too much stock on this. On the other hand, Medvedev has ended the year strong and Thiem has now finally won a major at the US Open. You have to believe that these two guys will be threatening (for titles) next year with Thiem challenging for his second major and Medvedev to maybe win his first. So maybe there will be some more equity in men’s tennis,” he said.

Only time will tell about what may happen next year and if Medvedev’s ATP Finals triumph will have any impact at all. The only certainty is that more people are starting to talk about the other guys and that is a victory in itself for the future of the sport.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending