Will Roger Federer Save The ATP Finals? - UBITENNIS
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Will Roger Federer Save The ATP Finals?

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At the ongoing ATP Finals in London, Roger Federer is the only Grand Slam champion remaining in the competition. The lack of superstars is certainly affecting the tournament. Besides Roger, Grigor Dimitrov is probably the player with the biggest talent and personality.  

 

Roger Federer (zimbio.com)

 

LONDON – On Tuesday night Roger Federer booked his semifinal spot at the ATP Finals with a three-set win over Sasha Zverev. This is great news for the tournament organizers whose hopes for a Federer-Nadal blockbuster match were shattered when the Spaniard withdrew from the event with a knee injury on Monday. “Fedal” materialized four times this year with Roger prevailing in all four occasions and a fifth battle between the two legends at the season-ending championships would have been an extraordinary event for the entire tennis world.

Federer came into the ATP Finals with only four losses in 2017: One of those losses came at the hands of Sasha Zverev in the Canadian Open final during the summer. Roger got revenge against the young German with a see-saw win in the second round-robin match of their group. The Swiss maestro captured his 51st win of the season and advanced to the semifinals which will be played on Saturday. On Thursday Roger will play an irrelevant match against Marin Cilic, who is already eliminated from the competition after dropping his first two round-robin matches.

Roger’s presence in the final stages is key for the credibility of the tournament. After Nadal’s withdrawal and Cilic’s elimination, Federer is the only Grand Slam champion remaining in the competition. This is one of the poorest editions of the ATP Finals in terms of great champions battling for the title. Perhaps a few younger contestants will eventually become great champions and there is certainly a changing of the guard looming all over this year’s event, but when 12 of the top 20 best players in the world are sidelined with injuries, the depth of the competition is certainly devalued.

I asked Federer about the injuries that are affecting most of the top players in his post-match press conference. “If we were 10 years younger, we would do much better,” Federer said. “Most of us are now 30 or older. Back in the days a lot of great players such as Edberg and Sampras retired as soon as they turned 30. Not everybody can play until 36 years old and it is somewhat normal to nurture a few injuries in your thirties and take longer breaks in order to efficiently go through rehabilitation and completely heal. As for players like Nishikori and Raonic, I am not quite sure about their problem. I am not very familiar with left wrist injuries because I don’t play with a two-handed backhand. Del Potro broke his wrist three times. I simply think that you have to learn how to better manage your schedule as you get older. Some players do the exact same things for 15 years before allowing themselves to take a break and hit the reset button.”

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A French reporter also asked Roger about his decision to skip the Paris-Bercy Masters and sabotage his chances to finish the year as the world No. 1: “I don’t have any regrets. Physically I couldn’t really compete, and I don’t know how many matches I could have won there. I would have compromised my chances to do well here in London,” Roger explained.

Federer is the only superstar left in the competition. Carreno Busta is taking Rafael Nadal’s place, but he’s not even close in terms of skills and popularity. Thiem and Goffin are also in the Spaniard’s group: They are two genuine and well-mannered guys with plenty of tennis talent – the Austrian is more powerful, while the Belgian is more of a finesse player. But unfortunately, none of them are selling out arenas yet. The player with the biggest personality in their group is Grigor Dimitrov, who not only is a super-talented tennis player but also a lady-killer off the court.

As for Federer’s group, the lack of quality players is even more evident. On Thursday Zverev and Sock will play for a spot in the semifinals, while Cilic is already eliminated. Zverev shows some quality tennis at times, but his inconsistency is still preventing him from becoming a great player. He was able to reach the No. 3 spot in the rankings due to the injuries and consequent absence of the top five ranked players of 2016, but he still has a lot of growing to do.

The 1998 Hanover edition was one of the most disappointing ATP Finals in history, when one of the groups was composed of Albert Costa, Alex Corretja, Greg Rusedski and Tim Henman. The tournament was eventually won by Carlos Moya, who defeated Corretja in the final. During the 2002 edition in Shanghai, Agassi withdrew after only one match and was replaced by Thomas Johansson, who joined players such as Jiri Novak, Juan Carlos Ferrero and Lleyton Hewitt in a lackluster competition. The 2003 edition in Houston had a group composed of Coria, Moya, Roddick and Schuettler, who is as ordinary as Carreno Busta in this year’s event. The most surprising outcome occurred in 2009, when Davidenko prevailed over Del Potro in an unexpected final.

(Article translation provided by T&L Global – Translation & Language Solutions – www.t-lglobal.com )

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Andy Murray Is Going In The Right Direction

Andy Murray came from a set down to pass another test against France’s Ugo Humbert to win 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, at the European Open on Saturday. The former world No.1 is through to his first singles final since Dubai 2017. Edging closer to his first singles title after coming back from a second successful surgery on his hip.

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Andy Murray – ATP 250 Anversa (foto via Twitter @EuroTennisOpen)

It seems that Andy Murray, who wasn’t sure whether he would be able to compete again at the beginning of the season this year, is finding his way back very well these days.

 

The Scot commenced his comeback slowly and carefully by playing doubles with Spain’s Feliciano Lopez at the Queen’s Club Championship in June. Where they both clinched the title in a very positive comeback for Andy, who seemed at the time very eager to play tennis again though he wasn’t completely ready for big stages as he always used to.

A couple months later in Zhuhai, he got his first singles win on tour since his comeback, which was followed by a loss to world No.26 Alex De Minaur in 3 sets. Taking on the US Open semi-finalist Matteo Berrettini in the opening round at China Open was a real challenge and a good test for the former world No.1 to evaluate how everything is going on. He passed in two sets in what was a good indication that everything is going in the right direction. Then he got past his countryman Cameron Norrie in three sets before falling to Thiem in two.

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He lost after Beijing in Shanghai to Fabio Fognini in the second round during a very exciting match. Including some clashes between both of them with Murray losing his game when he was serving for the match in the decider set.

Even if he didn’t get any significant result there, playing such long matches against top players is an essential part in the build-up process for his game mentally and physically.

“It’s just difficult in tennis, because you don’t get the opportunity to just come in and play one set like you might in other sports and build up your fitness by playing a little bit longer each time. You need to get it through playing matches and maybe at that stage I just wasn’t quite ready physically for long matches. But now obviously my body’s getting a little bit more used to it and coping fairly well.” Said Murray about his improvement.

In Antwerp this week, the Scot seems to be getting better as he got four singles wins in a row, so far, for the first time since his comeback. In other words the number of matches won consecutively in one week increases as he plays more which is a good indication that his body is getting used to it more and more and recovers faster, yet he still needs some time to reach his highest level. Having played long, intense matches in the quarter and semi finals against Marius Copil and Ugo Humbert today, which could have some effect on his physical readiness against Wawrinka. Who reserved a spot in the final by beating Jannik Sinner (6-3, 6,2). Both players dropped two sets on their way towards the final with Murray playing an additional match.

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Whether the Scot lifts his first single trophy since 2017 on Sunday or not, he is definitely getting in there with a very good rate. Considering he was thinking of retirement earlier this year than having a hip replacement surgery afterwards and now competing in such a level and one step away from a single title, that is a huge success. Moreover, he is getting more confident and mentally tougher which is shown clearly in the last two matches; surviving from a very tight situation and keeping cool in a very crucial moments.

Speaking about his aspects of the game, his defensive game has improved very fast. It’s been a fundamental part of his game throughout his career. He is trying to level up his offensive shots and turning from the defensive to the offensive when possible, especially on fast indoors courts, which would normally take more time as he’s gaining more confidence. Yet Murray needs to work hard on his serve, especially his second serve which costs him a lot of points sometimes very crucial ones.

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Laver Cup: As Europe’s blue reign, myriad hues peek out in event’s latest iteration

The 2019 Laver Cup showed all over again why it was an opportunity for tennis to be diverse in its offering.

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2019 Laver Cup, Team Europe, Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal
Photo Credit: Laver Cup

Twelve matches spread over a three-day weekend later, Laver Cup has modified the proverbial face and scope of men’s tennis. It is still viewed sceptically as a disruptor to routine, individual-focused tennis matches in certain pockets. Yet, the singularity it has brought into the midst of the prevalent concept of individuality is irrevocable.

 

In the third year of the event’s emergence, these aspects are repetitive. However, Laver Cup’s display re-lit the theme of a team before a player. It also elevated it to heights not seen in its previous two editions. This showed in the players’ camaraderie with each other. As it did in the numerous coaching tips that came from the bench from Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, and even Nick Kyrgios towards their fellow squad members.

Broadly, it was laid out in how the Laver Cup changed the subject from who would win the most Slams to which part of the globe would be victorious. For once, the conversation did not focus on 20 Slams versus 19, as it had come to be after Nadal’s win at the US Open. It was riveted on how two sportsmen with 39 Slams between them could set aside their competitiveness towards a common goal for a still-mushrooming tourney.

“Winning (as) teams is just amazing because you celebrate together. It’s a very special thing. Honestly, I really hope that this new and young generation keeps supporting this event because this event is special,” Nadal said after Team Europe’s three-peat on Sunday. “We need to make this event stronger and stronger because the atmosphere that we leave here is difficult to find in other places.”

The 33-year-old’s statements, aside from setting aside any cynicism about his involvement in the event this year, emphasised the growth Laver Cup has had in its three years. Nadal’s participation in Laver Cup’s inaugural year was seen as a novelty, a continuation of his and Federer’s triumphant return to the Tour after an injury-troubled 2016. Novak Djokovic’s inclusion in Europe’s 2018 squad was viewed as a reiteration that the event was a fad, where top-ranked players would make a one-off appearance, before stepping away.

In 2019, the 12-time French Open champion’s return contradicted this previously-held supposition. This shifting of perceptions is why Laver Cup has turned problematic to the Tour’s other mainstay events.

If Laver Cup were to be regarded as merely an exhibition, a tournament with no relevance to how the ATP tour progressed year-on-year with its usual clanking schedule, all of the players’ emotiveness and reactions would have been on par with the idea of livening it up for its sake.

https://twitter.com/rogerfederer/status/1176258686269952000

On the other hand, when two former world no. 1s were heard sternly telling their touted successor not to be negative for the rest of his match, it was hard to convince that the whole atmosphere was made-up.

Though, it does bear noting that not being put-on and the ease with which it has been assimilated in tennis’ mainstay have been the catalysts for Laver Cup’s disparaging mooting in certain circles.

The past weekend it coincided with a couple of ATP tournaments, in St. Petersburg and Metz. Both events had several interesting match-ups of their own. Followers deeply vested in the sport knew the happenings across all tournaments held last week. But for casual viewers, it would have come down to picking one event over the rest.

The factoring in of this unnecessary chasm added to the enervation around tennis by making one take sides in a sport that is already at crossroads, without Laver Cup even being mentioned.

Yet, if it were about inclusivity, selectivity in audiences’ preferences is the other side of tennis’ coin. These choices cannot always remain aligned, even in accepting or discarding the tri-day tournament as a consequential pursuit. As Nadal opined, when asked to compare between his other title wins and his Laver Cup team win, “…every single thing is different and is important by itself.”

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Novak Djokovic Doesn’t Need Love, Just Respect

He will never win a popularity battle with Federer, but does that really matter?

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As a world No.1 with 16 grand slam titles, Novak Djokovic has proven himself to be one of the best players in the world. Yet, amid the outburst of boos following his retirement from the US Open last week, the debate surrounding his popularity in the sport was reignited once again.

 

Taking on the formidable Stan Wawrinka in the fourth round, a player known to play his best on the biggest stages of the tour, Djokovic called it quits during the early stages of the third set. Citing a shoulder problem as the reason. Something that had bothered him during the earlier rounds. On the Arthur Ashe stadium, the crowd was less than pleased with his decision to stop.

“I’m not being offended or mistreated by anybody. I don’t really pay too much attention on that.” Djokovic said of the crowd. “I like to respect others. I hope that others can respect me and my decision.’
“I’m sorry for the crowd. Obviously they came to see a full match, and just wasn’t to be. That’s all it is.’
“I mean, a lot of people didn’t know what’s happening, so you cannot blame them. It is what it is.”

The New York crowd are certainly unique when it comes to other grand slams. When you go to Wimbledon there is a guard at every gate to direct you to your seat. Talking during points is frowned upon and misbehaviour is certainly not tolerated. In Flushing Meadows, there is no such thing with people casually walking around the stadium during points. Highlighted by one journalist during the women’s semi-final who tweeted ‘Why are people just strolling around in the Arthur Ashe Stadium? Get to your f***ing seats.’

“Well, no, I really believe that he doesn’t deserve of course,’ Rafael Nadal commented about his rival. “I believe that he’s a super athlete. If he had to go is because he was not able to continue at all.
“For him is much more painful than for anyone on that Arthur Ashe Stadium.”

At a glance all of this could be put down to the sometimes rowdy New York contingent at Flushing Meadows. However, this isn’t the first time Djokovic has been in this situation.

Taking to the Wimbledon final back in July it was more than evident that he wasn’t the crowd favourite. It was rival Roger Federer, who won the event seven times. Chants of ‘Federer’ erupted around Centre Court. Prompting the Serbian to mentally transmute those calls into one of his own name.

It is clear that Djokovic is a powerhouse and an icon in the world of tennis given his achievements, but for some reason he isn’t able to generate as much popularity as his two rivals. Illustrated by their social media accounts.

PLAYER

*TWITTER FOLLOWERS

*FACEBOOK LIKES

Rafael Nadal

15.7M

14.4M

Roger Federer

12.6M

14.878M

Novak Djokovic

8.7M

7.063M

*numbers as of 10/9/2019

Whilst the 32-year-old may not be the most popular man in the world of tennis, that isn’t to say that he doesn’t have a loyal fan base. On social media that are groups of die-hard ‘Nole’ fans ready to defend their man from any potential criticism he receive. From first hand knowledge, some of them are very feisty to say the least.

The debate surrounding the popularity of the Big Three is one that will likely continue beyond their retirement, but that doesn’t mean that the focus should be taken away from their outstanding achievements. For Djokovic, he is the first player to earn more than $100 million in prize money, the first to win four consecutive ATP Finals, the oldest-ever year-end No.1 and the only man to win every Masters 1000 title.

Many have said his reception in the world of sport triggers memories of Ivan Lendl. In 1987 he graced the front cover of Sports Illustrated with the caption ‘the champion that nobody cares about.’ A reserved Lendl struggled to struck a special connection with the crowd in North America compared to what some of his opponents managed to do. Fortunately, he was later recognized and appreciated more for his contribution to the sport.

As for Djokovic, he is somewhat on the same ground as Lendl, but not to such an extent. It would be quite inconceivable for a magazine to place him on their front cover using the same caption as what was used for Lendl. Nevertheless, there are undoubtedly similarities.

It is likely that Djokovic will not be as popular as Federer, but that isn’t a problem. An all-time great is measured by their records in the sport and not how many are cheering them on. He shouldn’t be loved by everybody in the world, no player has the right to that entitlement. However, what he does deserve is a degree of respect. Something that is sometimes forgotten by the public attending the world’s biggest tennis events.

Maybe Djokovic’s true impact on the sport will not be recognized until he walks away for good. Whenever that will be.

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