Roger Federer Does Not Shine But Beats Tomas Berdych in Straight Sets in ATP Finals Debut - UBITENNIS
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Roger Federer Does Not Shine But Beats Tomas Berdych in Straight Sets in ATP Finals Debut

Ivan Pasquariello

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Roger Federer beats Tomas Berdych for the 15th time, winning by 6-4 6-2 in his debut match at the O2 Arena for the ATP World Tour Finals. Despite a shaky start, the Swiss takes advantage of Berdych’s nerves in the first set and outplays the Czech in the second to collect his victory number 49 at the ATP Finals. The Swiss is also presented with two awards on court at the end of the match.

 

 

At his 14th appearance at the ATP World Tour Finals, Roger Federer collects victory number 49 beating Tomas Berdych in straight sets by 6-4 6-2 in 1 hour and 9 minutes. The Swiss doesn’t shine in his debut at the O2 Arena and takes advantage of a bad day from the Czech on his forehand. Federer doesn’t hit a volley until half an hour into the match, failing to show the brilliant progression he has got his fans accustomed with. The Swiss manages to find his best rhythm in time to close the match in straight sets, becoming increasingly more devastating on his forehand in the second set. As soon as the Swiss manages to put Berdych’s backhand under pressure, the Czech starts to fall into the trap, feeling pushed to close the rallies faster and ending up committing a whole lot of unforced errors. It is Federer’s 15th win against Berdych in 21 matches played against the Czech.

A winner in 2003-04, 2006-07 and 2010-11 at the ATP World Tour Finals, Federer has to play like he did in the second set against Berdych to make sure he can survive the Round Robin action with no hassle. At the end of the match, Federer was presented on court with the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award and the ATPWorldTour.com Fan’s Favourite Award. Roger’s coach Stefan Edberg steps on court with ATP’s CEO Chris Kermode to present the Swiss with the awards. It is the 11th time that Federer wins the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship award, the 13th time in a row he wins the fans’ favourite award.

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It’s the perfect ending to Federer’s first night out in London. The tournament has officially started and the Swiss has shaken off his first nerves.

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MATCH REPORT

Roger Federer (SUI) b. Tomas Berdych (CZE) 6-4 6-2 in 1 hour and 9 minutes

 

O2 Arena – London
RR ATP World Tour Finals 2015

Damian Steiner (Argentina)  – Chair Umpire

The crowd is obviously not so shyly rooting for Roger Federer as he gets the warmest welcome on court of the day.

 

Tomas Berdych starts the match serving, after winning the toss.

 

THE FIRST SET

 

Berdych plays two strong first serves to hold serve to 15 as Federer hits a backhand return wide. The Swiss tries immediately to put pressure on Berdych’s forehand, but Tomas stays consistent. Federer starts his match on serve with two consecutive double faults at 0-15, to go 0-40 right away. Berdych attacks on Federer’s backhand on a tender second serve, and breaks at his first chance to go up 2-0.

 

Federer has a chance to get right back into the set as he leads 0-30 on Berdych’s serve in the third game. The Czech hits a backhand in the net and faces his first 3 consecutive break points in the match. Federer breaks with a backhand drop shot winner to come back at 1-2.

 

Roger now looks more for Tomas’s backhand, but most importantly has found his first serve. The Swiss holds to love to tie the score at 2-2. Strong at the baseline, Federer has another chance on Berdych’s serve at 0-30, after winning a 20-shot baseline rally forcing the Czech into hitting a forehand in the net. Berdych commits a terrible forehand unforced error on an open court, allowing Federer with 2 break point chances at 15-40. The Czech saves the first with a first serve, on the second Federer plays a short return on which Berdych attacks with a deep forehand. Berdych closes the game with an ace to lead 3-2.

 

Federer starts the 6th game with his first ace of the match. Up 40-30 the Swiss hits his 3rd double fault in the match. The Swiss insists on Berdych’s backhand using his serve and holds to tie the score at 3-3. The Swiss has only won 2 points on his second serve up to this point, with a winning percentage of 28%. Too low for the Swiss, who struggles to find his rhythm on serve.

 

It is now Berdych who manages to dictate the rallies with his forehand, attacking on Federer’s backhand, pushing the Swiss to finish the rallies with a series of forced errors. The Czech holds to 15 and leads 4-3. Federer plays his first volley of the match on a second serve, hitting a backhand volley in the net. Despite the lack of progression, Roger fires a forehand winner and closes the game at 15, to keep the equilibrium going at 4-4.

 

Berdych starts to feel the nerves as he serves at 4-4, so much so that he plays a disastrous 9th game. The Czech kills an airborne forehand in the net to trail back 0-30, then fires another forehand wide to face three break points down 0-40. Another unforced error on his forehand, hitting an easy shot in the net, sets Berdych with a lost serve. Federer breaks to serve for the set up 5-4.

 

Serving for the set, Federer hits three first serves, including an ace, to lead 40-0. On the first set point, Berdych wins the rally with a forehand winner. On the second set point the Czech hits a forehand long. After 38 minutes Roger Federer wins the first set by 6 games to 4.

 

Federer had 8 winners and 7 unforced errors in the set, compared to Berdych’s 6 winners and 10 unforced errors.

 

THE SECOND SET

 

Federer wins the best point of the match at the net, after lobbing Berdych and closing the rally with a forehand volley winner. The Swiss starts to have fun and mixes up pace and shot-making. Roger gets to break point at 30-40 thanks to a backhand drop shot return winner. Berdych hits another forehand in the net and gets broken in the first game as Federer leads 1-0.

 

The Swiss holds easily, finally more aggressive with his forehand, to lead 2-0. Federer has another chance on Berdych’s serve, up 15-30. The Czech comes back to have a game point, but hits a backhand long to set the score to deuce. As Federer attacks with his forehand, Berdych is pushed off court and faces another break point at 40-A. Federer insists on Berdych’s backhand, to open up the court and force Berdych to hit out with his forehand. Tomas misses a forehand wide, and calls for the first challenge of the match. Hawk-Eye confirms the call and Federer breaks to lead 3-0.

 

Federer insists on using the drop shot, winning most of the points. The Swiss holds serve to love and leads 4-0 in the set as the match approaches its finish line.

 

On a first serve hit by Berdych at 30-30, Federer calls his first challenge, but loses the point. The Czech attacks on Federer’s backhand to close the game and trail back at 1-4. In the 6th game, Federer plays aggressive with his backhand to open up the court. The Swiss closes the game with a backhand cross-court winner at 40-30 to hold serve and lead 5-1.

 

With Berdych serving to stay in the match, Federer tries his first SABR return of the match, ending up losing the point at the net with a backhand volley finishing long. Berdych manages to stay alive, holds and sends Federer to serve for the match at 5-2.

 

Federer starts the game with a double fault, then gets to 15-15 closing the point at the net with a forehand volley winner. With two strong serves on which Berdych can’t return, Federer has his first 2 match points at 40-15. Berdych plays a fantastic point, closing with a drop backhand volley. At his second chance, Federer comes at the net and closes the match with a chopped forehand winner after 1 hour and 9 minutes.

Berdych has now a 0-6 record at ATP Finals openers.

 

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Australian Open: Men’s First Round Blockbusters On Day One

Cameron Norrie is among those in action on the men’s side on the first day.

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Cameron Norrie (@the_LTA - Twitter)

The draw for the Australian Open 2022 has been made and the schedule has also been released ahead of tomorrow’s opening day.

 

Writer James Spencer picks out the men’s matches to look out for.

The match I am most looking forward to is Britain’s Cameron Norrie up against the young American hotshot Sebastian Korda.

Both players had breakout year’s last year in 2021 on the ATP Tour.

Norrie established himself as British number one and shocked many to win a first Masters 1000 title, triumphing at a re-arranged winter edition of Indian Wells, back in October, coming from a set down to beat Nikoloz Basilashvili.

That win propelled him into featuring as a reserve at the Nitto ATP Finals in Turin.

Korda, son of the great Petr Korda who won the 1998 Australian Open and a finalist at the 1992 French Open, has also exceeded expectations.

And revenge could be in the air for Norrie, who was beaten by Korda in Delray Beach last year, as the young American made his first ATP final before losing to Hubert Hurkacz.

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The world number 40 reached the round of 16 at Wimbledon last year, upsetting the likes of Australian Alex de Minaur and Britain’s Dan Evans.

The year before, in the re-arranged COVID impacted winter French Open, he reached the round of 16 for the first time in his career beating Andreas Seppi and John Isner, before succumbing to eventual champion Rafael Nadal.

Another intriguing match-up is Australia’s John Millman, who famously knocked out Roger Federer in five sets in the third round of the 2020 US Open, who takes on Spain’s Feliciano Lopez.

Still going strong at 40-years-old, the grass-court specialist who will be well known to British tennis fans for winning the Queens Club title in 2017 beating Marin Cilic and in 2019 overcoming fellow veteran Gilles Simon.

Millman will have the home support of the Melbourne faithful but Lopez will be eager to show that he’s still got it.

Having reached last year’s Wimbledon quarter-finals, and the last-16 of the Australian and French Open’s two years ago, Hungary Marton Fucsovics is a powerful player and can cause some serious damage.

He faces Serbia’s Dusan Lajovic, a Monte Carlo Masters finalist back in 2019, over on Court 14. With only five places separating the pair in the ATP rankings, I expect this match to go the distance.

If you’re into big-servers then the 23rd seeded American Reilly Opelka will clash with former Wimbledon and US Open finalist Kevin Anderson.

Expect both players to put on a serving clinic in firing down the aces.

And finally, talented Italian Lorenzo Sonego takes on former Wimbledon semi-finalist Sam Querrey.

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Australian Open Daily Preview: The First Major of 2022 Begins

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Matteo Berrettini in Melbourne (twitter.com/AustralianOpen)

A year after this event was delayed until February due to the pandemic, the Australian Open is back on schedule in 2022.  While Serena Williams, Roger Federer, and Novak Djokovic will not be present, top names like Rafael Nadal, Naomi Osaka, Ash Barty, and Daniil Medvedev are all playing.

 

The men’s singles draw only includes four Major singles champions (Nadal, Murray, Cilic, Medvedev).  Will this be the second straight Slam where a new Grand Slam champion is crowned?  Following the deportation of Djokovic, reigning US Open champion Daniil Medvedev is now the favorite.  But how will he react to that pressure?  And recent Slam finalists like Sascha Zverev, Stefanos Tsitsipas, and Matteo Berrettini are eager to take advantage of this opportunity.

The women’s singles draw features 14 Major singles champions.  As the trend has been for many years, the last nine Slams have been won by eight different women.  Will someone such as Barty or Osaka assert their Major prowess, or will another new name prevail?  And how will Emma Raducanu and Leylah Fernandez perform after their electrifying runs at the US Open?

Monday’s schedule sees three of 2021’s most improved Americans taking on top ATP names: Nadal, Berrettini, and Norrie.  WTA action includes the 2020 champion taking on a title winner from just 48 hours earlier, while another of Saturday’s champs faces the No.2 Australian.  And defending champion Osaka, as well as top-seeded Barty, will also play their opening matches.

Each day this preview will highlight the five most intriguing matchups, while outlining the other notable matches on the schedule.   Monday’s play will begin at 11:00am local time.


Matteo Berrettini (7) vs. Brandon Nakashima – Second on Margaret Court Arena

With Djokovic removed from the draw, Berrettini is now the highest seed in his quarter.  Six months after reaching his first Major final, Berrettini is seeking put last year’s Australian Open disappointment behind him, when he was forced to withdraw from his fourth round match against Stefanos Tsitsipas due to an abdominal injury.  Injuries have unfortunately been a recurring theme in Matteo’s career.  Just two months ago at the ATP Finals, the Italian was heartbroken when an oblique injury knocked him out of the event’s debut in his home country.  In his return from injury at this month’s ATP Cup, Berrettini went only 1-2, though he did push Medvedev to three sets in a high-quality affair.  Nakashima is a 20-year-old American who won two Challenger titles last season, and reached back-to-back hard court ATP finals in July.  Brandon earned six top 40 victories in the second half of 2021.  He can definitely test the Italian No.1, but he cannot match Berrettini’s fire power, which should enable Matteo to dictate his fate.


Cam Norrie (12) vs. Sebastian Korda – Third on Kia Arena

Kia Arena is a new 5,000-seat on the grounds of Melbourne Park, and is now the tournament’s fourth-largest venue.  Norrie had a tremendous 2021, going 52-25 with two titles, including his first Masters 1000 title at Indian Wells.  However, he’s currently on a four-match losing streak, and went 0-3 two weeks ago in the ATP Cup.  Meanwhile, Korda rose 80 spots in the rankings last season, finishing inside the top 40.  The now-21-year-old claimed his first ATP title in Parma, and was the runner-up of the ATP Next Gen Finals.  Last January, in the Delray Beach semifinals, Korda defeated Norrie 6-3, 7-5.  Sebi is yet to compete in 2022, as he tested positive for COVID upon arriving in Australia.  With neither player currently possessing a considerable amount of momentum, 12th-seeded Norrie is the favorite to advance based on his recent success and significant edge in experience.


Rafael Nadal (6) vs. Marcos Giron – Not Before 4:00pm on Rod Laver Arena

As Gaspar Ribeiro Lanca highlighted on Twitter, this will be the first Major of Nadal’s long career without both Federer and Djokovic in the draw.  But Rafa does not arrive with much match play, which is usually crucial to his chances at a Slam.  This will only be Nadal’s fourth match since the first week of August.  He only required three wins to prevail at a lead-up event two weeks ago in Melbourne, his first tournament since undergoing a procedure to address a lingering foot injury.  Overall Rafa was 24-5 in 2021.  At this event a year ago, he let a two-set lead slip in the quarterfinals against Stefanos Tsitsipas.  Giron is a 28-year-old American who achieved a career-high ranking of No.56 this past October.  Between June and October, he reached four ATP quarterfinals.  However, upending  a player as formidable as the 20-time Major champ is a feat Marcos is yet to achieve.  But he should offer enough to resistance to reveal just how ready Nadal’s body is for this Major, in his first best-of-five match since June.


Sofia Kenin (11) vs. Madison Keys – Not Before 5:00pm on John Cain Arena

Last week was huge for the career of Madison Keys.  After going 11-15 last season, she gained her first title since 2019 by becoming the champion in Adelaide.  Similarly, Kenin also had a rough 2021, and is hoping to rediscover the form that made her 2020’s WTA Player of the Year by bringing her father back as her coach, just six months after he left her team.  Kenin has a 2-2 record thus far in 2022.  These Americans played three times in 2019, with Keys taking both of their hard court matchups.  Based on that history, and their current form, Madison should be favored to eliminate the 2020 champion. 


Paula Badosa (8) vs. Ajla Tomljanovic – Last on Margaret Court Arena

On Saturday in the Sydney final, Badosa overcame Barbora Krejickova in a third-set tiebreak after a dogged fight by both players.  The Indian Wells champ has now won 13 of her last 16 matches.  Tomljanovic advanced to her first Major quarterfinal six months ago at The Championships, but has lost almost as many matches as she’s won since that time.  And just this past Wednesday in Sydney, she was defeated by Badosa in their first meeting.  Assuming Paula is fully recovered from Saturday’s grueling final, the Spaniard should be able to eliminate the Australian for the second time in as many weeks.


Other Notable Matches on Monday:

Naomi Osaka (13) vs. Camila Osorio – This will only be Osaka’s fourth match since her US Open upset at the hands of Leylah Fernandez.  Osorio is 20-year-old from Colombia who ended 2021 at a career-high ranking thanks to reaching her second WTA final in October.  This is their first career meeting.

Reilly Opelka (23) vs. Kevin Anderson – Opelka achieved his first two Masters 1000 semifinals last year, and debuted inside the top 20.  Anderson has struggled to regain his level of a few years ago after battling multiple injuries.  Six years ago in Atlanta, when Reilly was ranked 837th in the world, he upset Kevin in three sets.

Ash Barty (1) vs. Lesia Tsurenko (Q) – Barty was a stellar 42-8 in 2021, and started this season by winning a WTA title in Adelaide.  Tsurenko is a 32-year-old who came through qualifying without dropping a set, and was a quarterfinalist at the 2018 US Open.  Both of their previous encounters have occurred in Australia, with each prevailing once.

Barbora Krejcikova (4) vs. Andrea Petkovic – The reigning French Open champion is coming off the aforementioned demoralizing loss on Saturday to Paula Badosa.  Last summer, Petkovic earned her first WTA title since 2015.  But she also lost to Krejcikova last summer, as Barbora was victorious in straight sets at Wimbledon.

Sascha Zverev (3) vs. Daniel Altmaier – Zverev accumulated 59 wins last year, and has advanced to the second week at the last eight Majors.  Altmaier is a fellow German who ended 2021 by winning a Challenger tournament in Puerto Vallarta.


Monday’s full Order of Play is here.

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Will Sydney Tennis Classic Be The Launchpad For Andy Murray In 2022?

Andy Murray is looking to build on his good start to the season, but what can the Brit achieve in 2022?

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Andy Murray (@atptour - Twitter)

Sir Andy Murray may have lost the final of the Sydney Open to an impressive Aslan Karatsev 6-3, 6-3 but what does the rest of the season have in store for him?

 

After a gruelling week consisting of four wins on his way to the final, the British number three must quickly recharge his batteries ahead of the Australian Open.

In Melbourne Murray will have to contest the best of five sets, adding extra importance to keep the points and matches shorter, to conserve energy throughout the tournament.

The former world number one will no doubt take a lot of confidence from the week he has had. Nearly three years to the day that Murray stunned the world that he would be retiring from tennis due to long standing hip problems he has since defied expectations.

Following a hip-resurfacing operation to insert a metal hip, Murray won the Queens doubles title that year in 2019 alongside friend and talented grass-court specialist, Feliciano Lopez.

He also appeared alongside Serena Williams at Wimbledon, in a mixed-doubles dream team to make any tennis fan foam at the mouth. Most impressively, however, later that year he beat fellow three-time Grand Slam champion Stan Wawrinka from a set down to win in Antwerp.

Since then, a worldwide pandemic has disrupted sport but this hasn’t stopped Sir Andy. Last year, Murray crept into form securing notable wins over Roger Federer’s Wimbledon conqueror Hubert Hurkacz and ATP rising stars Jannik Sinner and Carlos Alcaraz.

The 34-year-old ended 2021 by beating old rival Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals of the Abu Dhabi Mubadala Championships before falling short in the final against the talented Andrey Rublev.

However, something seems different with Murray this year. Is it the sharp new haircut or the colourful Castore clothing? Or is he simply enjoying his tennis again?

By stringing together more matches on court, Murray’s form and fitness have increased dramatically. He may have looked forlorn and disappointed that it was not him who lifted the Sydney Open trophy yesterday, but he had a glint in his eye to suggest he is back and fighting for the best tennis trophies in the world again.

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