Konta upset Petkovic as the Ladies Round of 16 is set - UBITENNIS
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Konta upset Petkovic as the Ladies Round of 16 is set

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US OPEN – Johanna Konta’s win streak continues to 16 matches as she knocked out Andrea Petkovic (18) in straight sets 7-6 6-3 for her first ever appearance in the 2nd week of any major. Konta will take on Petra Kvitova (5) who has equaled her best performance at the US Open when she made the 4th round by defeating Anna-Karolina Schmiedlova (32) in straights sets as well 6-2 6-1. The women’s draw Round of 16 have been set and despite the many upsets along the way, there are some cracking and scintillating matches set to take place.

 

Konta’s take down of yet another seed is by far one of the most impressive things at these championships. After losing in the opening round of Wimbledon, Konta has yet to drop a match, winning 2 ITF events and coming through qualifications to get into the main draw here at the Open. Her tennis is impressive and her mental fortitude in her matches thus far is even more noteworthy. Petkovic is not an easy player to get by but the British player is displaying a level of maturity beyond what her experience on the tour should denote. After failing to close out the opening set up 6-5, Konta dominated the breaker taking it 7-2 points. In the 2nd set she again seized early control of it racing to a 5-1 lead. She failed to serve out the match in the first go around but battled hard in the 9th game to take it 7-6(2) 6-3. Her matchup against Kvitova will not be easy. The Czech player usually struggles in the NYC heat and humidity but this year, both the scheduling and the weather have been favourable to her and she is looking every bit the 2-time major champion.

2011 champion Sam Stosur (22) took out 2012 semifinalist Sara Errani (16) in 3 sets. Errani is always a dangerous opponent to face at any event as she is as determined and resilient as the best of them. However, on this day, Stosur brought her A-game and showed why she won this event 4 years ago beating none other than Serena Williams (1) in the finals. Stosur won 7-5 2-6 6-1 and will face another Italian Flavia Pennetta (26) who also made the semifinals here back in 2013 and the quarterfinals last year. Pennetta took on Czech Petra Cetkovska who earlier beat Caroline Wozniacki (4). Pennetta won 1-6 6-1 6-4.

Varvara Lepchenko became the 4th American to get into the Round of 16. She took Germany’s Mona Barthel in 3 sets 1-6 6-3 6-4. Lepchenko will face 2-time finalist here Victoria Azarenka (20) for a place in the quarterfinals. Azarenka is looking like her former self again, showing that trademark resilience and fight in tough matches. She face Angelique Kerber (11) who recently won Stanford. Kerber served for the opening set 5-3 but was unable to close it out as Azarenka reeled off 4 straight games to take it 7-5. This would turn out to be crucial because had Kerber taken this set, she could have had the match in straight sets when she won the 2nd set 6-2. However, it was not to be for Azarenka was determined not to lose out at these championships. Azarenka took it 7-5 2-6 6-4.

Simona Halep (2) is looking impressive again. She is an underdog at these championships but she is playing the type of tennis that made her dangerous at majors last year. She took out American qualifier Shelby Rogers 6-2 6-3. Halep will take on Sabine Lisicki (24) who by right should not be in these championships. Barbora Strycova had Lisicki against the ropes having secured the double break in the decisive set and served for the match twice. The Czech player came within 2 points from winning the match but those 2 points were too far. Lisicki after taking a medical time out, found the better part of her game, winning 5 straight games. She barely dropped points in this effort as she made few errors and took up aggressive court positions. Strycova who only minutes before was in the ascendancy soon was flailing on court. She could not find her game. Lisicki took it 6-4 4-6 7-5.

This is how the Round of 16 is shaped up on the ladies side:
TOP HALF
– Serena Williams (1) v Madison Keys (19)
– Venus Williams (23) v Annett Kontaveit
– Kristina Mladenovic v Ekaterina Makarova (13)
– Roberta Vinci v Eugenie Bouchard* (25) 
* Bouchard’s fate at these championships are in question as she sustained a head injury Friday night in the ladies locker room. She slipped and hit her head forcing her to withdraw from both the women and mixed doubles events. The USTA released a statement saying that her condition is being monitored and a determination about her participation for the rest of the event would be made at some point on Sunday when she slated to play Vinci in the round of 16.

BOTTOM HALF
– Petra Kvitova (5) v Johanna Konta
– Sam Stosur (22) v Flavia Pennetta (26)
– Varvara Lepchenko v Victoria Azarenka (20)
– Sabine Lisicki (24) v Simona Halep (2) 

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Cancelling Wimbledon Was Inevitable And So Was The Heartbreak That Followed

The outpouring of tributes shows why the grass-court major is one of the most special events in the world.

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On Wednesday an announcement from The All England Club confirmed what many have both expected and feared in the world of tennis.

 

The Wimbledon Championships has been axed from the 2020 season due to the Covid-19 pandemic. It has been 75 years since the tournament was last dropped from the calendar and that was due to World War Two in 1945. To underline the uniqueness of the decision, the tournament has never been cancelled during peacetime (outside of the World Wars) since its birth in 1877.

“This is a decision that we have not taken lightly, and we have done so with the highest regard for public health and the wellbeing of all those who come together to make Wimbledon happen.” AELTC Chairman Ian Hewitt said in a statement.
“It has weighed heavily on our minds that the staging of The Championships has only been interrupted previously by World Wars but, following thorough and extensive consideration of all scenarios, we believe that it is a measure of this global crisis that it is ultimately the right decision to cancel this year’s Championships, and instead concentrate on how we can use the breadth of Wimbledon’s resources to help those in our local communities and beyond.”

Nobody can fault the action taken to cancel the grand slam. Coinciding with the announcement, the Department of Heath confirmed that a further 563 people in the UK have died from Covid-19 to bring the total to 2352. It is the first time there has been a rise of over 500.

Still, players are left devastated by the fact no Wimbledon will take place. The tournament is one like no other. It prides itself on tradition whilst trying to incorporate the latest technology to keep in line with the current world. Over the years, it has essentially transformed into a renowned brand. Illustrated by the 500,397 who attended the event last year over a 13-day period. For the players, it is the premier court that is in the hearts of many.

“Every time you come back and play at Wimbledon on Centre Court, you warm up and all you hear is the sound of the ball, your movement, your breathing, because people are so quiet. They really only applaud for good shots. They never applaud for unforced errors. It’s just a very respectful crowd. It’s such a totally different feel to anywhere else in the world.” World No.3 Roger Federer once said.

Federer holds the record for most Wimbledon titles won by a man at eight. He was tantalisingly close to a ninth in 2019 with two match points in the final, but lost to Novak Djokovic in a marathon encounter that lasted nearly five hours. For the Swiss maestro, the tournament is considered his best shot at adding to his grand slam tally.

Kevin Anderson reached the final of the tournament back in 2018 after coming through a marathon exchange with John Isner that lasted 396 minutes. The third-longest match to ever be played at Wimbledon.

“I’ve always had so many great memories at Wimbledon. The grass season will definitely be missed, but the most important thing right now for us to focus on is that we’re all staying healthy and safe at home.” The South African wrote on Twitter.

‘One of the happiest days of my life’

Like Djokovic, Simona Halep will have to wait until 2021 for a chance to defend her title at SW19. Last year she produced a sublime performance in the final when she simply broke down the game of 23-time grand slam champion Serena Williams with her high intensity and relentless shot-making. Becoming the first ever Romanian to win a singles trophy there.

“Last year’s final will forever be one of the happiest days of my life! But we are going through something bigger than tennis and Wimbledon will be back! And it means I have even longer to look forward to defending my title.” She said.

For Petra Kvitova the grass-court major has always had a special place in her heart. Following her second triumph at the 2014 Championships, the Czech spoke of her pride of being able to lift the title in front of tennis legend Martina Navratilova. An idol of Kvitova who is the most decorated singles player in Wimbledon history with nine titles.

“Not only is it a special tournament for me, but it’s a tournament that has been part of history for so long that it will leave a big hold in the Calendar,” said Kvitova.
“I will miss playing on the beautiful grass and wearing my whites, BUT of course we know it will be back next year. And Maybe we will all appreciate it even more.”

Billie Jean King knows better than most people how much Wimbledon has changed over the past 50 years. The American, who co-founded the WTA Tour, played her first tournament in 1961 when she won the doubles tournament. Since then, she has attended the All England Club every year without fail in some capacity. Regularly sitting in the royal box alongside many other living legends of the sport. Over an 18-year period King won a record 20 Wimbledon titles in both singles and doubles.

“I have been fortunate to go to Wimbledon every year since 1961 and I am certainly going to miss it this year.” She said.
“Right now, we need to make sure we are taking good care of ourselves and loved ones. These are challenging times for all of us and now is the time for us to do what is right for our world and what works for our sport.”

It is said that you never realise how much something means to you until it is taken away. A sentiment that many current and former players are expressing following the announcement. It is the latest blow in what has been a truly devastating year for both sport and the entire world.

Following the cancellation of Wimbledon, all professional tennis tournaments have also been cancelled until at least July.

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Wimbledon Announces Cancellation As Coronavirus Continues To Affect Tennis Calendar

For the first time since World War Two, Wimbledon has been cancelled.

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Wimbledon has announced it has cancelled this year’s tournament due to health fears over the coronavirus. 

 

This is the first time since world war two that the famous grass-court tournament at SW19 has been cancelled as the coronavirus continues to impact the tennis calendar.

In a statement, Wimbledon confirmed that the next edition of the tournament will occur in 2021, “It is with great regret that the Main Board of the All England Club (AELTC) and the Committee of Management of The Championships have today decided that The Championships 2020 will be cancelled due to public health concerns linked to the coronavirus epidemic,” they said on their website.

“The 134th Championships will instead be staged from 28 June to 11 July 2021. Uppermost in our mind has been the health and safety of all of those who come together to make Wimbledon happen – the public in the UK and visitors from around the world, our players, guests, members, staff, volunteers, partners, contractors, and local residents – as well as our broader responsibility to society’s efforts to tackle this global challenge to our way of life.

“Members of the public who paid for tickets in the Wimbledon Public Ballot for this year’s Championships will have their tickets refunded and will be offered the chance to purchase tickets for the same day and court for The Championships 2021. We will be communicating directly with all ticket-holders.”

Speaking on the decision, All-England Club chairman Ian Hewitt admitted that health and public safety was more important than tennis right now, “This is a decision that we have not taken lightly, and we have done so with the highest regard for public health and the wellbeing of all those who come together to make Wimbledon happen.”

“It has weighed heavily on our minds that the staging of The Championships has only been interrupted previously by World Wars but, following thorough and extensive consideration of all scenarios, we believe that it is a measure of this global crisis that it is ultimately the right decision to cancel this year’s Championships, and instead concentrate on how we can use the breadth of Wimbledon’s resources to help those in our local communities and beyond.”

As a result of today’s announcement, all grass-court tournaments in England and abroad have been cancelled as there will be no tennis until the 13th of July at the earliest.

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Amelie Mauresmo Fears 2020 Season Is Over, But Becker Disagrees

Two former world No.1 disagree on what will happen to the sport this year, but what is the current stance of the governing bodies?

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Former world No.1 Amelie Mauresmo has said she is doubtful that there will be any more competitive tennis played this year due to the covid-19 pandemic.

 

Both the ATP and WTA tours are currently suspended until June 8th due to the deadly virus. According to the John Hopkins University there has been an estimated 800,000 cases of Coronavirus globally that has killed over 37,500 people. The disease is particularly dangerous to the elderly and those with pre-existing medical problems.

In light of the epidemic, it is likely that the Wimbledon Championships will be officially cancelled later this week following a series of emergency meetings. Making it the first time the grand slam has been scrapped in peace time. Wimbledon wasn’t played 10 times during the first and second World Wars. It is expected that a decision concerning a potential extension of the tour suspension will be made after the announcement.

Weighing in on the situation, two-time grand slam champion Mauresmo believes officials could be soon forced to cancel the entire season. Echoing similar comments that were previously made by Craig Tiley, who is the chief of Tennis Australia.

“I think that we are going to have to draw a line under the 2020 tennis season.” Said Mauresmo.
“The international circuit = male and female players of all nationalities including their coaching staff, spectators and people from all over the world who bring these events to life.
“No vaccine = no tennis,’ she added.

Due to the unpredictability of the epidemic, it is unclear as to when life around the world will return to normal. However, not everybody is thinking the worst when it comes to tennis this year. German legend Boris Becker has called for an end to what he describes as ‘doom and gloom.’

“We should stop with all this doom and gloom — of course tennis will be played this year,” he tweeted in a reply to an article concerning Mauresmo comments.

Looking beyond Wimbledon, two grand slam tournaments are still hoping to take place this season. The US Open is scheduled to get underway on August 24th in New York. Although the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which hosts the tournament, has been turned into a 350-bed hospital to help New York cope with the Covid-19 outbreak. Meanwhile, the French Open is optimistically intending to play their event the week after the US Open concludes.

What are the governing bodies saying?

In regards to planning for the future of the tennis season, the women’s Tennis Association (WTA) has shed some light on their potential plans. In a statement sent to Reuters News Agency on Tuesday, they are pondering the possibility of extending the calendar beyond the first week of November. Allowing more tournaments to be played and therefore more players can earn money.

“The WTA is diligently working with our tournaments to maximize earning possibilities when the professional tennis circuit is able to resume and is considering an extension to the current 44-week season to enable more tournaments to take place,” the WTA statement reads.
“It is our sincere hope to return to the court as soon as possible – when the health and safety or our players, fans and staffs can be guaranteed, we will be back competing.”

It is likely the male equivalent, the ATP, is considering similar approaches. Although they have yet to publicly comment on their potential plans. ATP chairman Andrea Gaudenzi admitted on March 24th that it is unknown as to when the tour will be able to resume.

“This is bigger than any sport. The current situation raises many questions which we empathize with greatly, and we are working hard on evaluating all options.” He said.
“Our ability to address any supportive measures will be best guided once we know the duration of the crisis and when the Tour will resume, which remains unknown at this time.“

Finally, the International Tennis Federation is also pondering what their next move will be. The ITF is responsible for the Olympic tennis event, as well as both the Davis Cup and Fed Cup. Later this year Madrid, which has been severely hit by Covid-19 cases, is set to hold the 18-team Davis Cup Finals. Although ticket sales for the event has been halted with a release date yet to be confirmed.

“Due to the current global situation caused by the impact of Covid-19 it is yet to be determined when tickets for the 2020 Finals will go on sale.” Officials said in a statement obtained by the Guardian.

There are also questions concerning how future decisions will be made. The suspension of play saw a joint-statement from the ATP and WTA. A rare glimmer of unity in a sport split up by various governing bodies with their own interests. Although the head of the WTA, Steve Simon, insists that all the relevant bodies are working together on a regular basis.

“It’s very important right now for our sport to be working together. We are in contact on a daily basis with the ATP, as well as the ITF and grand slams. I think the sport is working very well together. There are obviously, when you go through these things, blips in the script.” Simon told The Tennis Channel.

Both the men’s and women’s rankings have been frozen until play resumes.

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