US Open 2014 – Andy Murray: “I don't know exactly why it happened today. I need to just try and find out what went wrong” - UBITENNIS
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US Open 2014 – Andy Murray: “I don't know exactly why it happened today. I need to just try and find out what went wrong”

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TENNIS US OPEN 2014 – 25th of August 2014. A. Murray d. R. Haase 6-3, 7-6, 1-6, 7-5. An interview with Andy Murray

 

Q. That was hard to watch. How hard was it to play?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, it was tough. I was just saying to Russell out there that, you know, sometimes it happens. Normally it’s kind of a gradual thing, but after maybe two-and-a-half, three hours maybe you start to feel like that. Just it came extremely early on and in a stage where, you know, sometimes nerves can bring it on. I certainly wasn’t nervous at the beginning of the third set after just winning a tough second set. So, yeah, it was tough.

Q. We spoke to you on Saturday. You emphasized just how good you’re feeling physically. When something comes out of the blue like that, were you quite concerned about finding out what the underlying issue is between now and your next match?

ANDY MURRAY: I mean, well, I can’t worry about it too much. There’s nothing I can do. This is the shape I’m in for the tournament. I feel or I felt extremely good before the match, and I did train very, very hard to get ready for the tournament. For me it was unexpected, and therefore, quite difficult mentally to deal with, because, like I say, sometimes it can happen one area of your body. But when it starts to kind of go everywhere, you don’t know exactly where it’s going to creep up next. When you stretch one muscle, something else then cramps, too. It was tough. Yeah, like I say, very unexpected, as well, especially after an hour and a half, an hour and 40 minutes. So it’s unlikely, I would say, that it’s down to maybe poor physical condition, because I have trained and played matches. Like in Toronto against Tsonga was longer than that and I felt absolutely fine at the end. I don’t know if it’s something I have done in the last few days that’s been wrong or not, but I need to try and find out why.

Q. What’s your level of concern physically going forward? Are you confident that you and your team can get yourself straightened out in the next couple of days?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, I don’t know. We won’t know until the next match or until I’m pushed and in those sort of conditions again. Like I say, I was very surprised when it happened. Then it’s hard because you want to be able to just, okay, focus your energy on trying to win the match, but you need to then have tactics as to how you’re going to deal with how you’re feeling. You know, do you try to finish the match in three sets after I had gone a break down at the beginning of the third? Do you try and conserve energy? It becomes tricky, and you start to think about the cramps rather than just actually what you’re trying to do on the court, which is obviously win the match. But, yeah, I managed to get through in the end.

Q. I suppose one of the puzzling things is you have actually been out here for kind of seven weeks, haven’t you? You have had the whole post-Wimbledon period in Miami. Does that add to the surprise of how the state of affairs has come about?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, I was surprised about that, and I trained very hard, so I don’t know exactly why it happened today. I need to just try and find out what went wrong, because, yeah, the conditions in Miami were significantly hotter and more humid than it was out there today. I mean, it was hot today, for sure, but I don’t think it was particularly humid. It felt very dry or fairly dry, anyway. And, yeah, at the time it happened I didn’t feel like — I wasn’t exhausted. I didn’t feel incredibly tired or anything. And, yeah, it just happened. The fact that it was the whole body would suggest that maybe it was something to do with my eating or drinking, because if it’s through fatigue in one part of your body, then, yeah, that would probably be down to conditioning. But cramping in my left forearm? I mean, I didn’t use my left forearm a whole lot today compared with other parts of my body, so I would expect it would be something to do with what I have eaten or something or not eaten.

Q. Did you consider retiring at any point?

ANDY MURRAY: No.

Q. Did you think that your experience playing matches in the past in quite a bit of discomfort…

ANDY MURRAY: Well, cramps, it hurts. It hurts a lot. And like I say, when it is the whole body, that’s when it — I mean, it’s not really scary, but it’s just like, you know, you don’t want to go into certain positions, because when the muscle totally goes into cramp, then it’s very, very painful. It’s very sore. So, yeah, just glad it didn’t really get to that stage where I actually couldn’t move.

Q. How much did your experience in the past through pain help you get through?

ANDY MURRAY: It’s happened before. It’s not the first time it’s happened. I’m sure all of the tennis players have experienced it at some stage. But like I say, it was just weird that it happened after like an hour and a half or an hour and 40 minutes. Because, I mean, even if I was in bad shape I would still be fine normally after that amount of time.

Q. You didn’t call for the trainer today. Was that because you didn’t feel there was anything the trainer could do for you? I know you said in the past you feel sometimes players abuse the rules for having treatment just for cramping.

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, I didn’t think you were allowed treatment for cramps. I mean, you can get the trainer on and say it’s something else, but it was pretty clear what was happening. And at that stage it was like, well, what does he come on and treat? I mean, my quads, my forearms, and my lats. One treatment I don’t think he would have been able to help. You just try to get as much fluid and eat as much as you can at the change of ends.

Q. Do you know what you will do to check it out? Will you have tests or anything like that you can do? Just go on in your preparation?

ANDY MURRAY: I mean, maybe speak to a nutritionist and look at what I had eaten the last three, four days. I don’t think I was that dehydrated, because I needed to go to the toilet when I got off the court. And not to be too graphic, but it wasn’t like it was like brown. You know, I was fine. I wasn’t particularly dehydrated. I don’t know exactly what happened, but I will try to get to the bottom of it before I play again.

Q. You mentioned having to change tactics because you knew you couldn’t do certain things. What were you trying to do? What do you think you did that was most effective that got you through?

ANDY MURRAY: I don’t know, actually. I don’t really know. Obviously couldn’t really get my free points on my serve. Obviously when you’re tired and struggling you want to be able to do that, but I couldn’t. Like my left lat was cramping, so I was struggling to throw the ball up and keep my left arm up. Just one of the things you need to do well in the serve. I mean, I tried to play more upright. I wasn’t using my legs as much. But, I mean, tactically when I got the chance to finish the point I just tried to go for a winner. When he missed the first serve I tried to be very aggressive on the second serve returns. That was it.

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Laver Cup Deserves More Respect From ATP, Says Captain McEnroe

The American tennis great believes more needs to be done to make the team competition more prestigious in the future.

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Former world No.1 John McEnroe has called for the Laver Cup to be turned into a stand alone event with no other ATP tournaments taking place at the same time it takes place.

 

The multiple Grand Slam champion is the captain of Team World who lost 14-1 to Europe in the latest edition of the event which took place over the weekend. This year’s Laver Cup featured ten top 20 players but the six highest-ranked individuals all represented Europe – Daniil Medvedev, Stefanos Tsitsipas, Alexander Zverev, Andrey Rublev, Matteo Berrettini and Casper Ruud.

However, McEnroe believes the three-day event needs to be given more priority if it wishes to emulate the success of Golf’s Ryder Cup which also pitches Europe against the rest of the world. This year’s Laver Cup took place during the same time as ATP 250 events in Metz, France and Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan.

This is my personal opinion, but I don’t think there should be any tournaments going on if they want to try to get to the level of a Ryder Cup, say. It’s got to stand on its own,” McEnroe said.
“It’s not going to be like, ‘Well, other players need to be able to play and … get their points in Kazakhstan or wherever they are right now.’ I just don’t agree with that. I think it’s a mistake by the ATP.”

The Laver Cup first took place in 2017 and became an ATP Tour sanction event just two years later. Meaning they receive the same back-up and logistical support as other events on the Tour. However, ranking points are not awarded to players unlike the ATP Cup which does. The 2021 edition saw each member of the winning team take home prize money of $250,000.

“Yet it’s difficult to sort of get, sort of, the respect that I think this deserves,” McEnroe continued.
“It tears me up.”

It is the fourth time in a row that Europe has come out on top against their rivals. The only players to score a point for McEnroe’s side this year was Denis Shapovalov and John Isner in the doubles on the opening day of the tie.

“We battled our best. These guys are a great team, no question, incredible team,” McEnroe commented.
“Obviously, if you get a couple different results, could have put more pressure on them (Europe), but we just came up short in I think four tiebreakers. (If) you win half those, totally different story. Other matches we had a chance to get in. We gave it our best, but they were too good.”

The Laver Cup will move to Europe next year with it being held at The O2 in London which was the home of the ATP Finals for more than a decade.

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Alexander Zverev Pushed But Manages To Beat Isner As Europe Storms To Lead In Laver Cup

The German gave Team Europe a massive lead after winning a tight match.

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image via https://twitter.com/LaverCup/

Alexander Zverev needed a trademark ” Laver Breaker” to beat the 6ft 10 Amercian John Isner 7-6, 6-7, 10-5 in two hours and 17 minutes on the saecond day of the Laver Cup.

 

The German hit 13 aces in the match, meanwhile Isner went 0 for 3 on breakpoints.

” I think in this format playing John (Isner) is one of the toughest opponents there can be and he is the best server of all time plus he was hitting the ball extremely hard and well today,” said Zverev.
To be honest I played a pretty good match,” he added.

In the first set, both players had zero issues holding serve. In the opening tiebreak it was extremely tight but the world number four managed to get the crucial break at 4-3 and that was enough for him to serve out the first set.

The second frame stayed on serve until 3-3 when the American had two chances to break but the Hamburg native managed to save both. In the following game he responded by earning three break points of his very own but Isner saved all three and held serve.

Isner had another chance at 5-5 but was unable to convert and again proceedings went into another tiebreaker to decide the second set. In that breaker, the world number 22 jumped out to a 3-0 lead before the German responded winning the next three points to make it 3-3.

After that, it stayed on serve until 7-6 and it was the American who managed to break Zverev to win the second set and force a match tiebreak to decide the match.

The first four points went on serve and it was the German who got the first break and jumped out to a 6-3 and that lead was enough for him to serve out the match and give Team Europe a 7-1 lead.

After the match in his on-court interview, Zverev spoke about the second set and the level both he and Isner was playing at.

” Even the second set that I lost I didn’t do many things wrong so it shows that the match was very high level and obviously happy to give Team Europe the lead”. He said.

Day 2 results :

In the first match of the day, the Aussie Nick Kyrgios faced Stefanos Tsitsipas and it was the world number three who took the match in straight sets 6-3, 6-4 in one hour and 26 minutes.

After the match, Krygios mentioned in his post-match press conference that the Laver Cup would be the last event he played in 2021, stating that his mother’s health is not doing well and he is planning to return to Australia to be with her.

In the night session Danil Medvedev, the current US Open champion, took on Denis Shapovalov and the Russian only needed one hour and 15 minutes to beat him 6-4, 6-0 to give Team Europe a 9-1 lead.

In the last match of the day, a doubles clash featuring Tsitsipas and Andrey Rublev took on Isner and Krygios, and again it was the Europeans who managed to win 6-7, 6-3, 10-4.

Day 3 Preview :

On Sunday Team Europe will have a chance to clinch the trophy in their first match as they only need two more points and on Sunday a win is worth three. The day will start with a doubles match featuring Rublev and Zverev taking on Shapovalov and Rielly Opelka.

In singles, Zverev will face Felix Auger Aliassime, Medvedev will face Diego Schwartzman, and the last match scheduled is Isner vs Tsitsipas.

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Andy Murray Surging In Confidence After Reaching First ATP Quarter-Final Since 2019

The 34-year-old believes he is getting better with every match played on the Tour as he eyes a spot in the final later this week.

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Andy Murray (image via https://twitter.com/ATPTour_ES)

Former world No.1 Andy Murray says he is starting to gain more belief in his game after reaching the quarter-finals of the Moselle Open on Wednesday.

 

The three-time Grand Slam champion rallied to a 6-3, 6-3, win over Canada’s Vasek Pospisil in the French city. Murray dropped serve only once at the start of the second set but broke his opponent four times en route to the victory. It is the first time he has registered back-to-back wins on the ATP Tour since Wimbledon and it is the first time he has reached a quarter-final since winning the 2019 Antwerp Open.

Murray showed glimmers of his best tennis recently at the US Open where he took Stefanos Tsitsipas to five sets in the first round before losing. However, in his following tournament on the Challenger circuit he lost in the second round to world No.154 Roman Safiullin. Despite the mixed performances, the Brit says his fitness continues to improve and he believes he is heading in the right direction.

“For me, this period of the last few years has been the most I have played really,” Murray said following his win over Pospisil.
“My body feels good and I am starting to gain just a little bit of confidence with each match, starting to see the points and how I want to play them, which is great.
“There have been times in the past year where I have been a little bit confused and not seeing how the points are developing which was always a strong part of my game.
“It made me feel quite uncomfortable on court when I was feeling that way, so I am starting to get that back and the results are coming, my tennis is getting better.”

The 34-year-old, who now plays on the Tour with a metal hip after undergoing two operations, is targeting a return back into the world’s top 100 for the first time since 2018. He came agonisingly close in July when he reached 102. At present, he is currently ranked 113 but will climb at least four places following his run in Metz this week.

In the next round Murray will play either top seed Hubert Hurkacz or former top 10 player Lucas Pouille. Both players are likely to be a stern challenge for the three-time Grand Slam champion who is hoping to reach the final for the first time since 2007.

“I would love to get another opportunity to play here in the final, but there is a lot of tennis to be played before then potentially against the number one seed in the next round,” he reflected.
“It is not going to be easy if I want to reach the final, but I am playing well and have an opportunity.”

Murray has won 42 ATP titles and has earned more than $62M in prize money so far in his career.

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