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ATP Miami, interview with Novak Djokovic

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ATP Miami – N. Djokovic /R. Nadal 6‑3, 6‑3. An interview with NOVAK DJOKOVIC

 

THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

Q.  Congratulations on your win.  Even though you won Indian Wells, it seemed like your form today, at least from what I could tell, was much more confident and much more secure than your win over Roger a couple weeks ago.  Was it the court, your confidence, the opponent, all of the above?  What would you say to that?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, you’re right.  Indian Wells was a very special win for me because of the fact that I struggled throughout the whole tournament to kind of play consistently well throughout the whole match.

Coming back in more than few matches from set down, played four‑out‑of‑six three‑setters, but, you know, still managed to win the title against Roger in the final.

That was a great confidence boost for me that I carried on in this week, and this tournament has been perfect from the beginning to the end.  The matches that I have played I played really well, and I elevated my game as the tournament progressed.  The best performance of the tournament came in the right moment on Sunday against the biggest rival.

 Q.  Was it the conditions or the opponent?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, just the fact that I’m playing against Nadal and playing in the finals, fighting for trophy is already a huge motivation and responsibility to try to perform my best and to kind of be at the right intensity and right focus.

I didn’t have any letdowns throughout the whole match.  I was in a very high level:  serve, backhand, crosscourt, forehand.  I mean, I have done everything right, and I’m thrilled with my performance.

 Q.  From upstairs I was watching and said, This guy cannot lose today.  You were playing almost perfect.  What was going through your mind when you were playing Nadal and playing so good?  Do you also feel like, Today is my day?  This guy is not going to beat me?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I enjoyed very much the performance and the whole match.  With the way I played, I had to enjoy, had to feel good about myself, and I was very confident on the court.

But I did not want to lose focus for a second, because I knew that Rafa is a kind of a player that if you allow him, if you give him a chance, he’s going to capitalize, he’s going to get that chance, and he’s going to come back to the match and you’re going to lose the momentum.

So I didn’t want to lose that momentum, and I kept it all the way till the end.  I didn’t want to play ‑‑ even when I was a break up in the second, I didn’t want to have easier return games and kind of save the energy for the serve.  I wanted to play each point 100%, because I knew that, you know, I am in the control of the rallies at the moment and I needed that to stay that way.

So it was a great match overall.

 Q.  But tell us the truth:  You feel invincible?  You were playing great, man.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I think I explain to you enough how I felt on the court (smiling).

 Q.  Today was the 40th match against Nadal.  Can you elaborate a little bit about your rivalry with him?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Yes, definitely biggest rivalry I have in my tennis career.  It’s a great challenge always when I play Rafa on any surface, of course, especially on clay.  That is his most preferred surface, his most dominant there.

I have had some thrilling matches in last three or four years, and they were decided by few points.  It was very few matches that were one‑sided, so I knew what to expect from Rafa today.

When he fights for trophy, he comes out with a great intensity from the first point, and he wants to make sure he sends the message across the net to his opponent.

That’s why at the start I faced the break point, it was quite even, and then making a break obviously gave me huge sign of relief and I could swing freely and more confidently.

So that rivalry that we have is obviously great for the sport.  It’s great for us.  I’m enjoying every single match.  Hopefully we can have many more.

 Q.  You have won every Masters title since Shanghai, the ATP Tour Championships.  Should we be in for another 2011 from you?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I hope so (smiling).  I can’t predict what future brings.  I can only focus my attention and energy to the present moment and do what I do best, and that is to, you know, try to prepare myself, recover now after.  I have couple weeks till my first clay court match in Monte‑Carlo, a place where I live for last six, seven years.

I won that tournament last year.  I love playing in Monte‑Carlo.  I couldn’t ask for a better March of this season.  Hopefully I can carry that confidence on clay.

 Q.  Can you talk about how you were able to sort of take his movement out of the match?  That usually works to his advantage.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I know if I have the best chance to win against Rafa, that would be hard court.  That’s my most successful surface.

I knew what to expect from him, as I said before.  I know that he’s going to come out with a great intensity and focus and high level of performance.

Now it was a question if I can realize and achieve what I have planned tactically before the match, and if I can, if I can get free points on the first serve, if I can move him around the court, not give him this comfort zone, I have done everything really well from the start to the end.

It’s easier said than done.  Obviously he always makes you play an extra shot.  He’s a great competitor.  He has champion’s mentality.

Today everything went perfectly for me.

 Q.  Rafa mentioned that he felt a little bit disconcerted by your game.  What changed?  I mean, because you guys have played each other for, you know, many times.  Did you vary something?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I just prepared myself very well for this match, and I felt great on the court.  As simple as that.

As I said, there are no secrets between us.  We know each other’s game really well.  We played 40 times.  In general, our game will be more or less the same.  Nothing mainly is going to change.  He’s not gonna serve and volley, or myself.

So I knew what kind of game plan is ahead of me, and I have realized that in a perfect manner.

 Q.  Today was so exciting and challenging.  Would it be more challenging for you if you had the possibility to play all others from Big 4 in this tournament?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I played Andy and I played Rafa today.  I haven’t played Roger this week, but I have had tournaments where I played the top guys.  But I cannot choose my opponents, you know.  I play whoever I get to play.

 Q.  We asked Rafa that he likes challenges, was he glad that you existed.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Excuse me?

 Q.  We asked Rafa, he likes challenges, was he glad that you exist because he like challenges.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Okay.

 Q.  I’m going to ask you the same question.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  What did he answer (laughter)?

 Q.  You answer first (laughter).  He said, No.  I’m not stupid.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I’m going to answer differently.  I think challenges, big challenges that I had in my career changed me in a positive way as a player.

Because of Rafa and because of Roger I am what I am today, you know, in a way, because when I reached the No. 3 in the world and won the first Grand Slam title in 2008, the years after that I struggled a lot mentally to overcome the doubts that I had.

And all the big matches I lost to these guys was consistent but not winning the big matches, and then they made me understand what I need to do on the court.

I worked hard, and, you know, it’s paying dividends, I guess, in the last couple of years.  You know, obviously it’s not easy when you’re playing a top rival at the finals of any tournament, but if you want to be the best, you have to beat the best, you know.  You have to win against the best players in the world. That’s the biggest challenge you can have.

 Q.  You won both titles with Marian with you.  Is there a comfort level, the familiarity of his having been there for so long and everything that maybe presents a better or a more comfortable situation for you?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  The situation is still the same.  I mean, I don’t know if you are referring to Boris or…

 Q.  Just that he wasn’t there earlier.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  No, I mean, Marian is there.  There was a specific situation because of the surgery of the hip of Boris, and he couldn’t come to Miami, so Marian stayed.

I’m really glad.  I’m very grateful that Marian accepted to stay and he was here with me and we won the title again.

I mean, many times before I said that he’s not just a coach to me.  He’s truly a friend, somebody I can rely on in the tough moments, shared good and bad situations and things in life that I experience.

So he knows me very well.  He knows me of course better than Boris, but Boris just started working with us, and we have a great communication.  I look forward to seeing Boris in Monte‑Carlo.

Davis Cup

(Exclusive) Albert Costa: “Davis Cup Finals Are Going To Remain The Best Of Three Sets”

Last week at the Barcelona Open during one of the many suspensions due to the rainy weather UbiTennis had a chat with 2002 French Open champion Albert Costa in the elegant clubhouse of the Real Club de Tennis de Barcelona.

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By Federico Bertelli, translated by Kingsley Elliot Kaye

Born in Lleida, Albert Costa grew up as a tennis player at the  Real Club de Tennis de Barcelona and also won the tournament in 1997. When he retired from tennis he became the director of the tournament until three years ago when he handed it over to David Ferrer. One of the best stands on the centre court takes his name. Until the 1980s the tennis stadium was the Spanish team’s Davis Cup home.

 

Now, after stepping down from his role at the Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell, Albert Costa has become tournament director of the Davis Cup which is now advertised as “The World Cup of Tennis.” 

UBITENNIS: Players have asked to be able conclude their season before playing the Davis Cup. As a result, the group ties which will determine the eight quarter finalists have been moved to September and the final knockout stage will unfold over five days. What can you tell us about this? Is it going to be a definitive format?

Albert Costa: It hasn’t been confirmed yet but likely it will be six days starting on Tuesday until Sunday. It is not yet agreed with ITF but, as organisers of the event, our intention is to play from Tuesday to Sunday at the end of November. As far as the future is concerned, we are trying to find the best solution. We are aware that the first years will require some fine tuning but I believe that in the next one or two years we’re going to reach a consolidated format, which will enable us to work comfortably and to give certainty to our stakeholders. 

UBITENNIS: In 2022 and 2023 the Davis Cup will be played in Malaga. Can you tell us anything more about the selection process, considering that last year they were speaking about Abu Dhabi and then at the beginning of 2022 a neutral location was being considered?

Albert Costa: Actually we were in negotiations with Abu Dhabi, there was a concrete proposal. Then Malaga came up with a very attractive proposal and at that point we considered other factors which led us to choose the latter: tennis tradition and culture are at a different level in Spain and this was an aspect that drove Kosmos to choose Malaga. Other considerations are involved as well: an easier destination to reach for tennis fans. Europe is the centre of tennis in terms of countries and players, the ATP finals are played indoors in Turin. This last aspect is particularly relevant: in fact it is very simple to move to Malaga just a few days later and the environment is similar. Besides, Malaga is a city which is growing very fast and sees Davis Cup as an opportunity to gain visibility and to pair with its tourism.

UBITENNIS: The first edition of Davis Cup with the new format was played at the Caja Magica in Madrid, where the Mutua Madrid Open usually takes place. One of the advantages of the facilities is the possibility to use the three indoor courts simultaneously. Has the idea of playing simultaneous matches been put aside? Playing more than one match at the same time could allow them to go back to the 5-set format like in the old Davis Cup. 

Albert Costa: I know very well the format of the former Davis Cup, but we have ruled out going back to five set matches. We haven’t taken into consideration the option of playing simultaneously.

UBITENNIS: But with the current three match format, the double counts very much, much more than before; amazing runs like those of Djokovic or Murray, who a few years ago carried their teams on their shoulders and led them to victory, now would no longer be possible.

Albert Costa: It’s true. With the new format, having a great number one isn’t enough. You need a balanced team with a good doubles. But in this way the format makes competition tighter and more open and potentially there is a great number of teams that can win the trophy. This makes it all more exciting. For instance Serbia, in spite of having Djokovic, who has dominated tennis over the last years, hasn’t yet succeeded in winning the Davis Cup with the new format.

UBITENNIS: Summing up, the 3-match format, two singles and one doubles, isn’t going to change.

Albert Costa: Yes, I confirm this is the direction we are taking: 3 matches in one day.

UBITENNIS: Speaking about the calendar, which are your expectations in terms of public, now that tennis fans have got two months to make arrangements for going to watch their team? Last year it was very complicated since the teams qualified for the quarter finals were known only one week before they actually played.

Albert Costa: Now it’s much easier. We are going to work with travel agencies in order to set up interesting packages. We are also going to work with the national federations in this direction. We are aware that environment and support are the distinguishing traits that make Davis Cup so special. Our target for 2022 is to have at least 1000 supporters for each team cheering their players from the stands. The environment is definitely one of the key factors to success. This means that we want at least 8000 supporters coming from the different countries for the final eight. If Spain were to reach this stage, the number would be even higher. Then we have to add the neutral public that simply comes in to enjoy tennis. Our idea is to create an experience which combines Davis Cup with the possibility to have a trip to the Mediterranean and enjoy the city.

UBITENNIS: The old format was no longer viable. For many players winning Davis Cup once in their career was enough, whereas Majors are never enough. How do you think you can succeed in attracting the best players to always play Davis Cup?

Albert Costa: when I used to play from 1995 to 2005, I remember that the players were already asking to change the format. It was impossible to dedicate four weeks to the Davis Cup, which often involved moving to different surfaces from the Tour schedule. With the new format the workload is different. The players of a team that reaches the final stage have to invest three weeks. In terms of surfaces and event preparation it’s all much simpler: the final stage of Davis Cup is played indoors, just like the rest of the indoor season. As the matches are played best of three sets the players are much less impacted in terms of physical engagement, which is an excellent thing considering the increasing amount of injuries we’ve seen recently. It’s true that in the past many players were content with contributing to winning one Davis Cup only. We aim at providing a comfortable scheduling so that players will be eager to participate every year.

UBITENNIS: Wouldn’t the event be made more legendary if at least in the final the matches were played best of five sets?

Albert Costa: I understand the historical point of view, but also the finals of the ATP Masters 1000 and of the ATP Finals were played best of five sets and now things have changed. Especially with the stress, both physical and mental, which modern tennis brings in. Players are already pushing their limits. It’s already three matches, which means at least six hours of competition. It’s enough both for the public and for the players. I believe that the value of a Davis Cup victory cannot be measured on the basis of the physical toll paid by players. It’s the overall value of the team that ought to be rewarded, which is also the reason why it is fair that the most well-balanced teams, with a strong number 1, a good number 2 and a good doubles, are the most likely to win.

UBITENNIS: Under a communication profile the claim that has been delivered since 2019 is that it’s a World Cup of Tennis. This theme has already been broadly discussed, but I’d still like to hear your opinion as a former player.

Albert Costa: Before the format we used to play with, home and away ties, Davis Cup was like America’s Cup, where the winner of the previous edition waited for the challenger selection series. Changes are in the order of things. I believe that going towards a World Cup type of format, with a group stage and a knockout stage is an excellent solution.   

UBITENNIS: A last question: until 2023 everything is scheduled, in terms of format and location. For 2024 could there be an agreement with ATP Cup?

Albert Costa: We are working at it. Having Davis Cup at the end of November and ATP Cup at the beginning of January doesn’t make much sense. Kosmos and the other parties involved have to get into talks. We’re trying. Let’s see what comes out of it.

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Exclusive

(Exclusive) Viktor Troicki: “I’d like to win The Davis Cup as captain And With Djokovic Anything is possible”

The Serbian Davis Captain was interviewed by Ubaldo Scanagatta in Belgrade in the modern Novak Tenni Centre: “We aim at being one of the best tennis clubs in the world.”

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By Antonio Ortu

A nostalgic smile appears on Viktor Troicki’s face as soon as we evoke his victory in the 2010 Davis Cup Final. He won the decisive fifth rubber against Michael Llodra and Serbia was crowned Davis Cup Champion for the first and – till now – only time. 

 

“Hopefully there are going to be a few more coming! But now as a captain. Not anymore as a player. When you have Novak (Djokovic) in the team, the chances are pretty high. Now we have (Memoir) Kecmanovic who is playing very well, and there are also (Filip) Krajinovic and (Laslo) Djere. We have a really good team and I think we can go far this year.” Troicki tells UbiTennis. 

Last year Serbia lost in the semifinals to Croatia, who was then defeated by Russia in the final.

Winning a team event like Davis Cup would mean a lot for the country and their tennis movement. In fact, in 2011 all the players got a boost and played at their highest in the following season. 

“Novak had an unbelievable year, winning basically everything, Janko Tipsarevic started his best season in 2011. He also reached number eight in the world. Zimonjic was number one that year in doubles and I reached my best ranking, number 12, not so bad! It gave us the confidence to play our best tennis and helped us achieve the best results.” Troicki recounts. 

Thanks to this result in 2010, and above all thanks to the records established by Djokovic, who is now considered as one of the greatest tennis players in history, tennis has risen to an important role in the Serbian sportscape which had been historically centred on team sports. 

“Tennis is really popular. It’s one of the most popular sports in Serbia. People love to watch it and love to play it. They’ve really followed tennis since Novak, Ana Ivanova and Jelena Jankovic, and also Zimonjic in the doubles, became number one in the world. Novak is absolutely the hero and the best athlete ever of Serbia, so people really love and enjoy tennis.”  

The Serbia Open has just ended with Djokovic’s defeat to Andrey Rublev in the final. The tournament is scheduled in the ATP calendar as a 250 event. Yet the Novak tennis Centre features state-of-the-art facilities and a number of courts which equals the most prestigious and well-known clubs.

“Right now we have thirteen courts, but we are going to have some corrections. We are planning to have some indoor courts and we are going to lose some courts. But we are also going to extend the land we’ve got to make some other courts. In total we’re looking to have around 15 courts we can use all year during the winter and the summer,” Troicki outlines.
“It’s going to be one of the best centres in this region of the world. We’re trying to bring up players to raise the interest for tennis and bring more competitors. After tennis was very popular in 2010 and 2011 there was a slight decrease, so we are trying to get as many players as we can. We have really good players here in the centre who are among the best of their age in Serbia and across Europe. We’re really looking to attract as many good players as possible to have a base here and to train them.” 

Currently there are about 1500 official players in Serbia, but with the Novak Tennis Centre this number is surely destined to grow over the coming years.  

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Exclusive

Exclusive Interview With Goran Ivanisevic: ‘Djokovic Will Be Ready For French Open’

In Montecarlo, Ubaldo Scanagatta has a long talk with Djokovic’s coach who speaks about his work with the world No.1, as well as his own experiences as a player.

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Goran Ivanisevic is a name embedded in tennis history. His run to the 2001 Wimbledon title as a wildcard stunned the Tour and made headlines around the world. As a player he peaked at a high of No.2 in the world and won 22 ATP titles. Once his professional career came to an end, Ivanisevic found success as a coach and has worked with 20-time Grand Slam champion Novak Djokovic since 2019.

 

During this week’s Monte Carlo Masters, UbiTennis sat down with 50-year-old Ivanisevic to discuss his own experiences in the sport and the current state of Djokovic’s form. 

UBITENNIS: Good morning Mr Ivanisevic. We met many many years ago. You also played the final at the tournament in my hometown, Florence.

Ivanisevic: Yes, it was one of my first. 

UBITENNIS: When you were a kid. But in Italy you also had a great story as a junior: the Trofeo Bonfiglio, the Avvenire title. 

Ivanisevic: Yes. I started at Avvenire, Bonfiglio. After that I went to Florence, Milan Indoor. I also won the doubles with Omar Camporese. Also in Florence I played the final with Diego Nargiso. 

UBITENNIS: That was a major achievement! Not easy to bring him to the final… 

Ivanisevic: (laughs) Italy first of all is a neighbouring country, very close to my hometown, Split. I love Italy. I always play well in Italy. They like me there. I’ve got good memories. 

UBITENNIS: I remember you also played very well in Rome, once. 

Ivanisevic: Yes, till the final. But in the final I didn’t show up. (In Rome 1993 Jim Courier defeated Ivanisevic 61 62 62)

UBITENNIS: What did you do the night before? 

Ivanisevic: Actually nothing. I went to sleep at 9.30 in the evening. That’s maybe the problem.

UBITENNIS: You weren’t used to it!

Ivanisevic: I was too rested…

UBITENNIS: I remember one great moment when Marin Cilic won the US Open. Was it one of the best experiences you had as a coach?

Ivanisevic: Oh yes. It was my first coaching experience. The win for Marin was a very impressive thing, in the years when all these three guys were dominating. It only happened with Marin, (Stan) Wawrinka and (Juan) Del Potro.  And (Andy) Murray of course. That was a very impressive thing. That was the beginning of my coaching career. Yes. It was really an incredible feat.  Nobody really expected Marin to win. He played unbelievable tennis. And the way he played the last three matches, (Thomas) Berdych, (Roger) Federer, (Kei) Nishikori…he destroyed everybody.

UBITENNIS: I’m not saying this just because I’m interviewing you,  but in my rankings of attending a press conference when I say who the best people to talk to are, I say No.1 Goran Ivanisevic, No. 2 Goran Ivanisevic, No.3 Goran Ivanisevic, No.4 Andy Roddick. No.5 I don’t remember. I remember Wimbledon 2001, that year was unbelievable. 

Ivanisevic: Yes, that was an interesting 15 days. But I had fun with the journalists, I had fun in the press conferences. Maybe sometimes I was too honest. About my game, about describing whatever I saw, saying whatever I thought, and you loved it. I had fun. We all had fun. Times have changed. It’s all different. Now every PR tells you that you have to know what you are saying. I actually enjoyed those times, those press conferences. 

UBITENNIS: Do you remember when you said there were three different Goran Ivanisevic’s?

Ivanisevic: The good one, the bad one, the 9-1-1 the emergency! It created a good story. To cover myself,  have fun, and to win the tournament.

UBITENNIS: And now, what is the experience with Djokovic? First of all we could start from the end. The end which is yesterday. He didn’t play his best but, as you said to me, he wasn’t feeling well. 

Ivanisevic: He wasn’t feeling well before he came here. He was sick. Let’s say he’s not fit one hundred percent to compete. First of all in this situation. Three weeks ago he was not allowed to play here because of the Covid decision. Then France opened and he was allowed. And it’s difficult mentally. You can play to the semifinals. But you can’t prepare the way you would need to. And then he got sick. And, to be honest, I didn’t expect something spectacular from this tournament. But he’ll be going to the French Open in five/six weeks, he’s got a couple more tournaments and he will be ready.

UBITENNIS: Don’t you think that if he had won against Fokina Davidovic, since he had to play second round against Goffin or Evans, not heavyweight players, they don’t hit as strong as Davidovic, he could have found his form round after round and maybe go to the end?

Ivanisevic: You never know. This guy for me is the best player in the history of tennis. He always finds a way to win, he always finds a way to get out of trouble. About yesterday first of all, he was supposed to win the second set 6-0.  One moment he was losing three love when he was supposed to be leading three love. He had break points and game points. He lost a lot of energy.   But he’ll find his way out of this in his constant playing. He only had three matches prior to this tournament. Clay is not easy. Last year he started pretty badly here, he lost to Evans in the second round. Then in Belgrade he lost in the semis. He started to play well in Rome where he got to the final, then he won the French Open. So I’m not worried. He just needs some continuity, he needs to play more and more matches and he’s going to find his way.

UBITENNIS: Last year he decided to play the Olympics when was running to complete the famous Grand Slam. Wasn’t it too much? Do you think he maybe shouldn’t have gone there? Was it a matter of pride because it was his country?

Ivanisevic: First of all he’s very proud and he loves to play for his country. Every Davis Cup he’s played, every Olympic… 

UBITENNIS: You like this, don’t you? You were like that. 

Ivanisevic: No one could stop him from playing in the Olympics. I don’t think he made a mistake. I just think he made a mistake playing the mixed doubles. That was not necessary, because in the end he was tired. He didn’t even play for third or fourth place. I don’t think that because of this he lost the final of the US Open. (Daniil) Medvedev was very good. You can never underestimate him at any time. He’s an unbelievable player. He was a better player that day. But Novak was not Novak. Something was missing. But again, I don’t think it was because of the Olympics. It just happens. It happened in a bad moment. It happened in the most important match. Probably it would have been the history of tennis to win after… so many years. The first guy who had the chance to complete the Grand Slam in the same calendar year. 

UBITENNIS: A little bit like Serena Williams when she missed the Grand Slam losing to Roberta Vinci in 2018.

Ivanisevic: It can happen, but he’s human, he can have these days like that. But when you have Medvedev on the other side of the net you need to be one hundred percent. 

UBITENNIS: I’d like to ask you a few last questions. First of all, how did you react? Did you try to convince him to have a different schedule this year? There is this famous problem of the COVID-19 vaccination.
I also wonder – you are Croatian, he is Serbian: you seem to always be friends. I also see the journalists, they are friends. Croatian and Serbian now are friends. How has this changed so much in the last few years?

Ivanisevic: I wouldn’t say it happened just now. The war finished twenty years ago. Politicians sometimes have problems, not only in our country, but everywhere in the world. We are all friends, we speak the same language. That’s helpful. About another schedule, that’s impossible. Like I said before, three weeks ago he was not allowed to play here by the vaccine rules. 

UBITENNIS: Did you try to persuade him to have the vaccine? Or didn’t you even try? I know everyone is a person…

Ivanisevic: It’s his life, his decision. I respect his decision, his family. He said it truly that he’s going to risk his career. I even love him more for that because he’s standing by what he’s saying. He’s the only person in the world who says what he thinks. You know, one day they say one thing, one day they say another. He, from the beginning, is straight and this is why I respect him even more. Hopefully this pandemic is going to stop. Only now he can play all the tournaments. I hope that America will open so he will be able to play the US Open in September. 

UBITENNIS: Are you going to follow him in all the tournaments before the Roland Garros?

Ivanisevic: We need to talk first today, to see what the schedule is going to be. He’s going to play all and we’ll see how things are developing and we’ll decide day by day.

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